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book for directX game programming is up-to-date?

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Hello people. I would like to start game programming in DirectX, and i intend to buy this book: Introduction to 3D Game Programming with Direct X 9.0c: A Shader Approach link: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1598220160/ref=pd_cp_b_title/002-8134605-6440041?ie=UTF8 I am wondering if it is up-to-date and if it uses the latest version of DirectX. I mean, if i upgrade to Windows Vista, is DirectX 9.0c still going to work, or will there be a newer edition? Also, it seems that the book section of gamedev doesn't include it, so i would like to hear your opinion about this book, if you have read it. Thanks p.s: if you didn't find this book good it would be great if you could suggest a better one.

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DX9.0c is still going to be available in Vista but I believe it is through an emulation layer in the same way OGL is emulated in Vista. To put it another way, I am currently working on a commercial game port in my day job for Vista and its using DX9.0c and it still works :)

DX9.0c has still got a while to go even when Vista is out because not everyone will convert to Vista straight away so feel free to learn it. However, having said that the differences between DX9.0c and DX10 are significant enough that if I were to choose one above the other I would go with DX10 because there are some features of DX9.0c I really hate that DX10 solves (Lost devices being the primary one).

Not read that book but most of them were okay. I would also suggest checking out somewhere like www.codesampler.com which has helped me out in the past.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Thanks for the reply, but the problem is that i can't find any books about DX10. Do you have any suggestions?

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I'd emagine there won't be DX10 books out for quite a long time, I'm guessing roughly six months minimum after the official release of 10. By this, I mean graphics cards that support it. =]

If you have a large background knowledge in general 3D game workings, (not specific to directx) you can download the latest DirectX SDK that has several basic DX10 tutorials that will get you up to speed on DX10. I don't know much about DirectX specifically, but what I even could drag out of these tutorials (9 and 10)was astounding to just how improved 10 is over 9!

Also, I do beleave 9 is native to Vista, it is the basic requirement to running it. There is a new driver model (which kicks serious butt) in Vista, so they had to rework 9 for it. Also, this will mean (so I've read) that DX10 will be a Vista only API due to this model.


PS. If you have the brains, and that sparkling general knowledge, (even from the internet!) you can squeeze out a pretty decent understanding of DirectX from the SDK and all the samples.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
So should i buy the book, or wait untill the release of DX10 and buy a book about that one?

P.S i don't have prior experience with 3d graphics

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Learning DX9 definitely isn't wasted time, since most of what you learn will be applicable to DX10 - not the specifics, but the general principles and techniques. Also as said before, DX10 isn't out, Vista isn't out and DX10 video cards aren't out, and it would be better to spend the next six months learning something rather than twiddling your thumbs. There's no reason why you can't learn DX9 and then DX10.

Haven't read that book, but since you have no prior experience with 3d graphics, it would probably be a good idea to start with a book of some sort.

Firstly though you should download the DX SDK and look at the documented tutorials that come with it. They don't explain everything but they will get you started.

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The book you mentioned it actually perfect for exactly what you want to do. I would definately suggest learning DirectX 9 as both 9 and 10 will be used for quite some time in the future. Also even though D3D10 is a new API you will still need to know all of the basics of 3D and Direct3D in general and you can do that by learning DX9.

The reason I say that the book you mentioned is perfect is because honestly it is the only one I could ever recommend. You want to be learning shader-based graphics development as the fixed-function pipeline is depreciated and is taken out of DX10 and rarely used in DX9 development. This book sets you up for learning modern DirectX shader programming which is definately what you want to be doing.

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Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Thanks for the reply, but the problem is that i can't find any books about DX10. Do you have any suggestions?

Before one can write a book about DX10, one have to wait for some ahrdware that actually supports DX10. And this hardware doesn't exists yet.
Nevertheless, some books are known to be in project - for example, check the journal of our dear DirectX forum moderator... [smile]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Thanks for the replies guys.

> would be better to spend the next six months learning something rather than twiddling your thumb
That's exactly what i said.

I already ordered it from Amazon.com. The problem is that it will come in November :/

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Thanks for the replies guys.

> would be better to spend the next six months learning something rather than twiddling your thumb
That's exactly what i said.

I already ordered it from Amazon.com. The problem is that it will come in November :/

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