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super mario 3 (c++ users)

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Just trying to get some C++ user's input. You know how in Super Mario World 3, theres about 10-15 levels in a world, 8 worlds. Well, for each of you C++ programmers, how long would it take you, to create the 2D character (Mario), ONE level, and program it? Hours? Days? Weeks?

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The amount of work to create the first level and make it work would be *far* greater than the subsequent levels. Once you have all of the logic and code in place, creating new levels is relativley simple.

I'm writing a side scroller and have been working on it for 9 months. I'm nearly done though [smile].

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What did you do to start C++ game programming? Books? School? Tutor? Im still in highschool, so school / college isnt an option right now. It's better to have someone teach you, so you can ask questions. Are you or anyone else interested in being a tutor or helper on an instant messanger. Im a junior and want to have some good knowledge before entering college. Thanks.

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Well I'll tell you what I DO KNOW.

First and foremost learn and comfortably know how to use the language you plan to make your game with. So for C++ make sure you know pointers, structs, classes as well as the normal if-else, loops, and functions constructs. Then when you start game programming you can either get a book or go online to find a tutorial. When you need some help always feel free to ask questions here at GameDev.net. But again, first and foremost learn and comfortably know the language you plan to make your game with.

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Yeah, the base game code is the majority of the work. Getting a tile based world with collision, characters, a decent map format, and a collection of tools would probably take the most time, and after that producing the levels themselves should be easier. I'd probably spend about a week with a pen and piece of paper working out how the collision, controls, map format and enemy AI (among other things) would work, as well.

This not really a "beginner" project with C++; get it under your belt, make sure you can at least make a simple text game (guess the number, etc), understand pointers and classes, and some basic geometry (coordinate systems, etc).

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Depends. If I made that with the sole goal of getting one complete level working, I could probably do it in under 3 weeks.

On the other hand, if I wanted to:

1) Practice programming
2) Practice designing programs
3) Create an extendible Mario-style engine that could be used on future levels/games
4) Learn new aspects of game programming
5) Practice 'lower-level' programming (as in, not using a high-level game engine)

Then it could easily take me 6-8 months to get a single level done. Future levels would, of course, go considerably faster.

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Quote:

You know how in Super Mario World 3, theres about 10-15 levels in a world, 8 worlds. Well, for each of you C++ programmers, how long would it take you, to create the 2D character (Mario), ONE level, and program it?


To get some things straight: Usually, you don't 'program' a level. You program the game. That is, you write instructions that say, for example, 'if the Mario sprite is below a bonus block and the Mario sprite has a speed upwards, then a mushroom appears and the block becomes brown. If the Mario sprite is close to a mushroom sprite, then it becomes Super Mario and the mushroom disappears. If the Mario sprite is very close to an enemy sprite, then Mario's life decrease by one'. This is the main game logic, and it applies to all possible levels. The levels are usually made in some sort of editor and saved to a file. That file contains information(not code) about where the blocks are, where the enemies are, where the bonuses are and so on. The program reads the file and "plays" it. Once you have written the main program, you can create with the editor as many levels as you wish and can play them with the same program without writing a line of code. Of course, if the next levels include new objects, you have to update your code, but you get the idea. The level designing is pretty much a seperate job from programming, even though in the hobbyist area they're often done by the same person.

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