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mastek3d

How to make console games?

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Hello guys. I want ask question. How to make console games ? I know, Sony (PS3) and Microsoft (x360) send dev kits to game developers but I think Visual Studio, 3D Studio Max, Maya (these programs uses with making game for PC) like programs no available for console Dev kit hardware system. do console dev kits connect to PC ? How to make ? Regards...

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Original post by mastek3d
I know, Sony (PS3) and Microsoft (x360) send dev kits to game developers but I think Visual Studio, 3D Studio Max, Maya (these programs uses with making game for PC) like programs no available for console Dev kit hardware system.


Modelling programs export models which can be used on any system, providing you have the correct exporters that is. I expect you can use Visual Studio for Xbox and 360 games, and I also expect there is Visual Studio integration for PS3, although you will probably have to get hold of a lot of official software for it too.

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Development is done on a PC usually using Visual Studio or CodeWarrior. These then have plug-ins that allow for integration of deperate dubugging suits such as ones provided by SN-Systems and a system of libaries installed on the PC. Compiling any of these gives you an executable for the system you are targetting.

The development system is then connected to the PC usually via a ethernet network. How these work exactly can vary from system to system. For example, the PS2 and PSP both stream data from the host PC over the network whenever they try to load anything (although can also be configured to look for a disk to use). The XBox and presuably the 360 although I don't have the hardware for one yet, just the software, setup post build events in Visual Studio to copy the data from the PC to the XBox's hard drive then the XBox mounts the directory it copied to as the host drive.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
[quote]Original post by Naku
Development is done on a PC usually using Visual Studio or CodeWarrior. quote]

Who uses codewarrior these days?

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Original post by Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by Naku
Development is done on a PC usually using Visual Studio or CodeWarrior.


Who uses codewarrior these days?


Consider this:

- Microsoft makes compilers for Microsoft platforms.

- Sony bought SN Systems.


Which leaves...?


So the answer is, an increasing number of people!

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Original post by Anonymous Poster
Who uses codewarrior these days?
Nintendo.

I'm stuck with Code-shitting-Warrior doing DS development.

For DS development, you use a devkit which plugs into a USB port:

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Original post by Evil Steve
Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Who uses codewarrior these days?
Nintendo.

I'm stuck with Code-shitting-Warrior doing DS development.

For DS development, you use a devkit which plugs into a USB port:

Meh, atleast you got the hardware. All we got here at the moment is the Ensata emulator.

Took ages to get cygwin setup right with the right version of 'make' to get anything to compile for the DS.

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xbox uses xdk which integrates into vs.net 2003
ps2 also has integration but to vs 6 (1998) and codewarrior, prodg
gamecube has basically the same as ps2 but for gamecube
ps3 i hear is based on publicly available tools and
xbox 360 should be same as xbox but probably for vs 2005 and with xenon sdk
wii since its basically gamecube 1.5 with wiimote basically updated gamecube sdk tools

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Original post by Evil Steve
Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Who uses codewarrior these days?
Nintendo.

I'm stuck with Code-shitting-Warrior doing DS development.

For DS development, you use a devkit which plugs into a USB port:


Is Nitro emulator?

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Quote:
Original post by V-man
Quote:
Original post by Evil Steve
Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Who uses codewarrior these days?
Nintendo.

I'm stuck with Code-shitting-Warrior doing DS development.

For DS development, you use a devkit which plugs into a USB port:


Is Nitro emulator?


Check where the image is from. It is part of this website.

Enjoy.

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Quote:
Original post by Alpha_ProgDes
[google] for XNA.

Don't worry everyone will agree this is the best answer.
Yes, I'm being serious just [google] for XNA.


You've got to be kidding me! XNA is only good for Microsoft platforms and NOTHING else!

If you want to make console games, focus on cross platform solutions.

Your comment is analogous to saying, "Want to make a PS3 game, one word DirectX!"

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Original post by kgrandpak
You've got to be kidding me! XNA is only good for Microsoft platforms and NOTHING else!

If you want to make console games, focus on cross platform solutions.

Your comment is analogous to saying, "Want to make a PS3 game, one word DirectX!"

I tend to agree with the Alpha_ProgDes on that particular answer.

Re-read the parent post very carefully.

The poster had asked *specifically* about next-gen console dev kits. Not the DS emulator or the xbox modded versions, but writing for actual legitimate releasable next-gen PS3/Wii/XBox360 development. In order to have a chance at his homebrew program making it to the market, the only *viable* path will be an Xbox downloadable game, which means XNA.

Let's look at the paths:

Windows -> Wii. Very difficult even with the proper tools. Our teams with devkits and proper support have problems with that.
Windows -> PS3. Same as above.
Windows XNA -> XBox XNA. Possible to use the code almost directly. If the game passes the 0.001% chance of actually moving to the platform, it will be able to move fairly easily.


There is no chance whatsoever that an unknown homebrew developer will get any of those three devkits. It will not happen. There is an infinitesimal chance that an excellent homebrew game on PC which is fairly successful on its own web sight might be migrated over to the xbox if it were already written for XNA.


My advice - make it for one platform. Write it for a platform you have available to you. Don't bother thinking about any other platforms until you have completed it on the first platform.

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Quote:
Original post by frob
Quote:
Original post by kgrandpak
You've got to be kidding me! XNA is only good for Microsoft platforms and NOTHING else!

If you want to make console games, focus on cross platform solutions.

Your comment is analogous to saying, "Want to make a PS3 game, one word DirectX!"

I tend to agree with the Alpha_ProgDes on that particular answer.

Re-read the parent post very carefully.

The poster had asked *specifically* about next-gen console dev kits. Not the DS emulator or the xbox modded versions, but writing for actual legitimate releasable next-gen PS3/Wii/XBox360 development. In order to have a chance at his homebrew program making it to the market, the only *viable* path will be an Xbox downloadable game, which means XNA.

Let's look at the paths:

Windows -> Wii. Very difficult even with the proper tools. Our teams with devkits and proper support have problems with that.
Windows -> PS3. Same as above.
Windows XNA -> XBox XNA. Possible to use the code almost directly. If the game passes the 0.001% chance of actually moving to the platform, it will be able to move fairly easily.


There is no chance whatsoever that an unknown homebrew developer will get any of those three devkits. It will not happen. There is an infinitesimal chance that an excellent homebrew game on PC which is fairly successful on its own web sight might be migrated over to the xbox if it were already written for XNA.


My advice - make it for one platform. Write it for a platform you have available to you. Don't bother thinking about any other platforms until you have completed it on the first platform.


<blush> I admit I wasn't thinking about casual homebrew development. If thats your angle, then you are probably right. Develop on what you can and hope it goes somewhere from there.

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