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Sastrei

Attracting a programmer to a project...

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Hello all, I suppose this should go here, as I'm not ready just yet to post a formal call for help in the Help Wanted forum. Anyways, I'm looking to turn my mod for Homeworld 2 into it's own game. The mod is called Brickspace, and replaces Homeworld's ships with Lego ships. I've linked some screenshots below. Lego's classic Galaxy Explorer model. Several "Delta" ships engage the enemy. A fan made model duels with Blacktron 1 ships. The Classic Space fleet engages the Blacktron 1 fleet. BrickSpace Home Page On to the point, as I said I'm looking to turn this into it's own game, and possibly create a 2D shooter first as a run through of sorts, since I'm new to the process. I've already started on the shooter, reading through 2 books I purchased, and using C with the Allegro library. So, finally, my question is since the path will be slower and the product ultimately less impressive were I to do it all myself: --What can I do, in the eyes of those who know this forum and the people that populate it, to make my project appeal to the programmers on this board? How do I isolate those people that find this an inspiring project, and convince them that it is worth their blood, sweat and tears to create what is essentially half of this project (anything short of programming, I don't have a problem with). Any insights would be much appreciated, and I hope my post was coherent enough. :) -Stefan- P.S. - If anyone has concerns about my use of Lego IP, rest assured, I'm following their Fair Play policy and while it can't be officially endorsed, I believe Lego is already well aware of it.

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Well the way to attract people who programming is to show them that the areas you want to work on are on there way. No one wants to start a project that looks like the person creating it looks like he dosent know whats going on. That holds true for programmers looking for artists or the other way around, or even the many diffrnet topics of gamedev.

Me being a programmer would want to know what language you wanted to use, as well as what exactly you wanted to do, if you had any code of your own, what are the legal rights(may seem stupid but could be a issue).

So basicly you gota bring something to the table and be organized about what your doing to get someone to help you out.

hope that helps.

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Welcome to GDNet. [smile]


- First of all, you need to show that your idea is good and try to get people interested. The fact that you already have a working mod will go a long way towards doing this - be sure to show it off - include a few screenshots, link to the relevant sites, etc. Because people will be introduced to people by your post, make sure you check it for spelling and grammatical errors, and proof-read for any silly mistakes. Most people won't worry too much about some small errors, but the better your post the better impression you give.

- Secondly, you need to show what you can offer to the project. Again, having a working mod will be immensely helpful, but you'll also want to specifically say what it is that you'll be doing for the project, and keep in mind while you're doing so that providing the idea and leading the team (whilst both very important) won't count for much when trying to attract help.

I take it from your post that you can provide your own artwork? Make sure you say so. The fact that you're learning programming will also help you out, even if you don't actually end up contributing to this part of the project.

- You're using someone else's IP - and I notice you've already covered this - just make sure you also mention it in any Help Wanted posts to save anyone else bringing it up and to show that you've already put the thought into it yourself.

- Try to recruit it more than one place. I'm pretty proud of the Help Wanted forums here and genuinely believe they're one of the better places to get help, but trying elsewhere as well can only increase your chances.

- Don't try to recruit to many people at once. Larger teams can become difficult to manage, so at least when you're starting out you should try to keep it reasonably small. Also do be picky about who you take onboard - ask about any previous projects, look at any samples they have available, etc. and don't just take on the first people that want to help without considering others as well. You'll probably lose a couple of people whose interest dies off after a while or who aren't as skilled as they initially seem, but you just need to stick with it and keep showing off your best material until you get the project done.

- Also, take the time to read the FAQs and/or any sticky threads in whatever forums you use. I know I have one in Help Wanted here, and I'm sure other forums also have thier own rules; it'll look better if you follow them right away rather than having to be told, although if you honestly make a mistake don't sweat it too much. It may also be worth your while to just have a quick browse through some of the existing threads in any forums you plan to post in so you can see how other people have done things and how the particular community in question has reacted.


Looks like a cool project, and from the sounds of it you'll stick with it and should do just fine. Good luck, and I hope there's something helpful to you in my rambling. [smile]

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Thanks for the insight guys! Sounds like I'm on the right track, and just need to maybe think and plan out my game design a bit more before I post a formal Help notice.

Thanks again!

-Stefan-

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