• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Brad

In need of some general information

9 posts in this topic

I'd say it's worth it. Although there are there are a good number of advantages to programming in Windows, it's can take awhile to get the hang of. Learning the many nuances of Win32 while making your first game probably won't be a good experienc And besides, you'll probably learn something useful in the process of coding graphics/sound/input stuff instead of having DirectX / OpenGL to the dirty work for you.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The actual Windows code necessary for a game is minimal (a couple of dozen lines). The rest is DirectX/game code. Forget DOS, pick up Tricks of the Windows Game Programming Gurus (contains most of the Dummies book) look at the samples in the DirectX SDK and post any questions. It's not as hard as you think if you can look at things in terms of objects.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DirectX is very easy to learn and it would be well worth the effort to learn it from the beginning. Game Programming For Dummies would be a great book to get, but you may also want a more in-depth one like Inside DirectX (by Microsoft).
Oh, and speaking of Tetris games, I made one (available at the Developers Workshop here) that you can download the source code for if you need some help in getting started in DirectX. It uses DX 6, so it's about as current as you can get.

------------------
- mallen22@concentric.net
- http://members.tripod.com/mxf_entertainment/

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ok thank you for the responses.

I think that I'm going to go for it all and get a windows game programming book. If Direct X isn't all that hard to learn than than that's what I'll do. And I'm willing to put A LOT of time in it.

I need some book reccommendations. I'm thinking of "Windows Game Programming for Dummies" as I've mentioned, also "Tricks of the Windows Game Programming Gurus" which i've heard is pretty much the same book. So which one do you guys reccommend. Rember that I will be new to both windows programming and game programming so keep that in mind.

I've also heard "inside Direct X" mentioned.. some more info on that would be appreciated.

Also do any of those books come with a visual c++ 6.0 compiler? Right now I am using a borland 4.52 compiler and I've heard that directx needs a VC 6.0 or better. But i'm not exactly what you would call well informed.

so what do you guys think is best for me?
- Dummies?
- Tricks?
- inside Direct X?
- Others?
- All of them??

Thanks again for the help

[This message has been edited by Brad (edited November 29, 1999).]

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
IMO, you should definitely go with Tricks of the Windows Game Programming Gurus.
It's the only one I've read, but it's what I learned windows and DirectX from.
The main thing that's hard about windows is the terminology. It's not too bad, really.
That book assumes you know nothing about windows and very little about game programming, and it goes into physics, AI, and all sorts of cool stuff.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The book, Inside DirectX *only* teaches you DirectX. It doesn't go into how to program a game, or even, how to program for windows. You can learn a bit about windows programming from the examples, but a better choice would be tricks of the windows game programming guru's. I hear that it has a lot about programming for windows and how to go about making a game in it.

Directx doesn't require VC++ 6.0, you can write games with it in VBasic if you wanted. But I would suggest you just bite the bullet and purchase a C compiler. Instead of looking for a book that comes with a free one.

Hope this helps, good luck and god speed.

ps. remember... what they show in a book is not nessesarily the best/only/right way to do something, so don't be afraid to go your own way.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I suppose I should've mentioned that Tricks of the Windows Game Programming Gurus comes with an introductory version of VC++ 6.0. The intro version can do most everything that the real version can do, but every program you write pops up a little messagebox saying "This was made with the introductory version" or some annoying thing.
If you can manage to ignore that, then it functions perfectly fine and will compile all examples in the book (so basically anything you'd be worried about for a while).
Then, when you think you've had enough of that messagebox...or when you want tech support, or whatever, you can go buy a full version of VC++ for about $99.
However, when I bought my VC++ it had a rebate of $30 on it (I bought it about 2 weeks ago at CompUSA). So I don't know how long that rebate lasts, but if you get in on it, $70 is great for a compiler. I paid more than that for my DOS Turbo C++ compiler!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"Tricks of the Windows Game Prog. Gurus" is basically an extended version of "Win. Game Prog. for Dummies." It has every thing that the "Dummies" book has plus more. I have "Inside DirectX" but have only opened it a couple of times. "Tricks" explains 2D DirectX pretty well. "Inside DirectX" is a good reference book for DirectX, but not much more.

"Tricks.." comes with an introductory VC++, but you'll want to upgrade to at least the Standard version. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think you need VC++ for DirectX. I think you can use a recent version of Borland. Is this right?

Dan

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You are indeed correct, dlanicek, I used to write DirectX apps in Borland C++ 4.5, with a little fiddling around, so I assume anything better than that can do the same.

Good luck

Starfall

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have never programmed a game before but I am quite proficiant in using C++ and adequate with C in a DOS environment. (that's all i've been taught so far)

Well I've been working like a banshee at learning how to program games I eventually plan to try and make a side scroller (kinda like contra) with 2 of my friends this summer after we make a few simpler games. I am currently going through the old book "Teach YourSelf Game Programming in 21 Days"

My question is this: Is it worth it to go through that book and build up a dos library when it seems like everyone out there is using windows and direct x and making some pretty damn nice games that just blow those "mode 13h" games out of the water?

I don't want to waste my time learning about all of this ancient dos stuff, because I plan on (eventually) moving on to direct x which will allow me to make much better quality games

So should I go out and buy a book such as "Windows Game Programming For Dummies" or something similar that teaches me how to use direct x or will not having used windows before make that book to advanced for me.

Also, is it as easy as it seems to use direct x to make these games cause I have seen some pretty nice games. Even the simple games (like the tetris one I just downloaded) are very impressive to me.

Anyways thanks for reading this... if anyone still is and I appreciate any and all input I get.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites