Sign in to follow this  
l2ob122

Question.

Recommended Posts

l2ob122    142
I am so new to the whole programming thing i only found i had a massive interest in it not to long ago, in the past i had thought very highly about it but now im ready to take the big challenge. I know may a fraction of a % of what im doing, i know i am going right into C++ no questions asked, this field highly intesrests me and i would not have it any other way. Is it possible for absoulute new people to programming in a sence to self teach themselves alot of programming? ( no money for college of university just yet ) Is it hard to get a pretty good understanding of what to do by simply reading a book? ( or do i need the proffesional help of a teacher ) How much of programming basics do you need to know before you try to do game programming? How much math skills do you need to succeed in this field? ( my math skills are quite low but with the determation i would hope i could pull it off ) those are just some of things im wondering right now, any help would be very helpful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pitt    138
Of course you can learn how to program with a book, I learned that way, ok I'm not a great programmer, but I'm pretty sure there is a lot of people here that learned from books.
And you need to "get the logical" part of programming before making a game.
With "if/else/for/while/variables/pointers/functions" you can make a game, it only depends on how much you know about algorithms
And Math is not *that* important for 2D games, so keep reading the books and don't worry!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Adam Hamilton    271
Quote:
Original post by l2ob122
Is it possible for absoulute new people to programming in a sence to self teach themselves alot of programming? ( no money for college of university just yet )

Yes... I did it. I came straight from quick basic although I had to get my head around include files, semicolons and the main function but once I did that, I just got better and better.

Quote:
Is it hard to get a pretty good understanding of what to do by simply reading a book? ( or do i need the proffesional help of a teacher )

Yes and No... I managed to learn all my C++ out of a book, well several books cause some books didn't explain polymorphism to well and some books don't go into all that much detail on operator overloading. As for a teacher, All you need is a C++ compiler, linker and a place to run your test programs out.

Quote:
How much of programming basics do you need to know before you try to do game programming?

Probably a fair bit, but I think game programming requires logical thinking aswell.

Quote:
How much math skills do you need to succeed in this field? ( my math skills are quite low but with the determation i would hope i could pull it off )


Well, depends on the game, but I would say that you should at least know some trigenometry, and matrix math would be quite useful too.

That's what I think anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Telastyn    3777
Quote:
Original post by l2ob122
Is it possible for absoulute new people to programming in a sence to self teach themselves alot of programming? ( no money for college of university just yet )


Yes, certainly possible.

Quote:

Is it hard to get a pretty good understanding of what to do by simply reading a book? ( or do i need the proffesional help of a teacher )


It will be hard even with a teacher. Teachers help, but in the end you'll need a lot of time, practice, determination...

Quote:

How much of programming basics do you need to know before you try to do game programming?


Most of them before making even the simpilest non-graphical games. Graphical games will require far more than the basics, and even the most trivial of them won't be 'easy' until you've got a good mastery of many advanced topics.

Quote:

How much math skills do you need to succeed in this field? ( my math skills are quite low but with the determation i would hope i could pull it off )


Depends on what part of the field you focus upon. I've personally taken 4 semesters of university math (calculus and above) and found even that to be lacking for my pitious hobby games. But then again I'm doing almost everything myself. If you have coworkers or team members, they can usually pickup the math heavy loads. Even then, you should still have a good grasp of trig and if your game involves any physics at all then 2 semesters of calculus will help greatly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
synth_cat    306
When I decided to make a game, I started with DarkBasicPro. This was an invaluable experience for me because it taught me the way that game code is structured (which is probably one of the hardest things to figure out, in my opinion.) It also gave me the confidence to dive in at the deep end with C++ and Direct3D.

I have never had any education in this field - I've learned everything from books and online articles. It wasn't exactly a piece of cake, but I did it (and am definitely still in the process.) But I should mention that absolutely the most essential part of mastering programming and game design is to be creating code and projects as you learn; it's difficult to internalize this kind of information without simultaneously using it.

The gamedev forums have also been a hugely important resource for me - they're perfect for questions about specific details or software problems that won't be made in write-a-game-in-two-hours books.

Quote:

How much of programming basics do you need to know before you try to do game programming?

When I started learning C++ (I used C++ For Dummies, which was a very useful book, though it passed over some of the harder/weirder C++ functionality) I knew practically nothing. I started out writing an incredibly cruddy 3d engine in a command prompt window, which helped me learn how to structure a main loop and other really basic stuff like that. I would recommend starting out this way, doing at least a little bit of command prompt stuff before breaking into one of the complicated IDE's. I recommend the free GNU compiler (which comes with C++ for Dummies.)

Hope this was helpful

-synth_cat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this