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Vinniee

New to these forums =D

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Hey all, I'd like to introduce myself first, I'm Vincent van Balen, I'm 16 years old and live in Holland =) I started C++ programming a few weeks ago, bought Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 and a book called "Beginning Visual C++ 2005" which is written by Ivor Horton's. I have been a Guru3D Forum member for over a year now, and have 10.000+ posts :) I was already interested in how games work and now I am really interested in how it all works. So that's why I bought the program and book. I already bought the book "The CG Turorial" but that was way too difficult for me. I really like programming, I already know the basics about C++. And can program some console program ( yep, that's the best way to start ). I'm now reading a paragraph about Static casts, and this is a very simple program I made:
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
	float value1 = 14.5f;
	double value2 = 20.65f;

	cout<< static_cast<int>( value1 * value2 )
		<< endl;

	return 0;
}
And I'm going to do a Game Developing study next year. I already visited the Open day, and I really liked it there. There are two courses, one for the art and one for the programming. And ofcourse, I'm going to do the programming course :D So what do you think about it, and what do you recommend me to do? Just keep reading the book and progress :)? And is this where I should start if I want to learn Game Programming? :) Thanks for all the information, and I hope that I'll like it here :D Greetings, Vinnie.

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Yup, just keep on going. You're going to need the basic knowledge later on so it's a good thing to start straight away. Once you get a little further, you may want to delve into program design some more: the way a program is structured, how parts of it communicate with each other, etc. This becomes more important as programs grow in size. You can do all this by making interesting programs (read: simple games and tools)... ;)

It also doesn't hurt to know something about 'the art side': if you get a game programmer job, you'll be working together with various other people, and having a basic understanding of what their job is all about can help ease the communication between you and them. Plus, it gives you additional insight, another point of view. At least I find my level-design and art background quite usefull now, even though I'm a programmer.

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Quote:
Original post by Captain P
Yup, just keep on going. You're going to need the basic knowledge later on so it's a good thing to start straight away. Once you get a little further, you may want to delve into program design some more: the way a program is structured, how parts of it communicate with each other, etc. This becomes more important as programs grow in size. You can do all this by making interesting programs (read: simple games and tools)... ;)

It also doesn't hurt to know something about 'the art side': if you get a game programmer job, you'll be working together with various other people, and having a basic understanding of what their job is all about can help ease the communication between you and them. Plus, it gives you additional insight, another point of view. At least I find my level-design and art background quite usefull now, even though I'm a programmer.


Thanks for the reply dude :)
About the art side, well I've already done alot of modelling using 3Ds Max and Maya. At the study we, as the programmers, and artists will meet one day per week. And we will then "combine" the two sides. We are making the game together ;)

Thanks again :)!

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