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webjeff

Scene Management (Only 2 questions)

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Guys: I didn't want to use the term scene graph, because that term gets used out of context all the time. But I am building a scene graph, one of my nodes is for my octree that will contain the world essentially. My first Question: My octree will subdivide/partition my geometry of the world model. Can the octree contain full mesh's that don't get subdivided but rest in the leaf nodes for objects that are static but may get removed.... in like an editor. So another words, my leaf nodes in the octree will contain its verts/indicies and a list of mesh's that are in that node, like a tree. Second Question: My dynamic objects, im thinking of using a Bounding Volume Heirarchy. But, I have a hard time parenting the moving objects to anything, If I have like lets say 6 characters: 1 player, 5 NPC's. Should I even bother with a heirarchy? If I had 100 guys moving around, what could I use? Quadtree maybe? What do you think? I'm looking for ways to cull objects that aren't in the scene, and test collisions with smaller groups. My octree will be fine... pending the first question, but for dynamic objects, should I just do them brute force? What different things should I look up for ways to help handle culling/collision Thanks Jeff. PS: I have read a lot on the subject already, especially Yann L's posts, which I find very interested, he seems to have a deep understanding on this topic.

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1. Your approach for handling the world geometry sounds like a good idea, but you want to be careful not to make the Octree cells too small. On modern graphics systems, you want to send geometry in large batches whenever possible, so a coarse subdivision should be just fine for you. Depending on how your world is laid out, you might want to reconsider an octree. If the cells are mostly flat, then a quadtree would be more efficient. If things are are uniformly distributed in the world, then a flat uniform grid might actually be better (it would be easier to update for dynamic geometry).


2. For the dynamic geometry, you can either have a flat list of all the objects, with no parenting (just objects with bounding spheres/boxes). If there are a lot of movers though, you will probably want to store them in the same scene structure that you're using to divide up the static geometry, and shuffle them between cells as they move through the world. This lets you acheive the same culling efficiency for the movers as you have for the static things.

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