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Ideas for NeXe tutorials...

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I have some ideas for the future NeXe tutorials, in peticular things that I would like to learn how to do. Here they are: -mesh loading (from .x files) with lighting -.bsp or .map file loading -collision detection (DirectX 8 specific) -quake 2 model file loading -particle engine -texture blending -mixing 2d and 3d (on screen displays a la half-life or deus ex) -milkshape model loading Is it possible that any of these could become reality in the next month or two? I just wanted to hear what you people have to say.

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Those all look like excellent choices. In particular:

1. loading a mesh (whatever format)
2. animating them
3. getting decent 2D UI-type stuff on the screen.

also good would be:
4. BSP (hey I can dream)

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Apologies if this sounds a bit hyper-critical, but before you attempt all of those more "advanced" topics, perhaps you should do some more simple stuff.
one of the best things about NeHe''s site is that it doesn''t drop people in straight away, there''s lots of simple tutorials to get people up to speed before they attempt the advanced stuff.

For example, I noticed you''re using DrawPrimitiveUP to blit the tri''s.
surely the next tutorial step would be use of vertex buffers?
(and before a big UP versus VB debate kicks off, I''d like to quote the nVidia guys in that they say that using UP is BAD! and BATCH! BATCH! BATCH!)

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quote:
Original post by Nutter2000

Apologies if this sounds a bit hyper-critical, but before you attempt all of those more "advanced" topics, perhaps you should do some more simple stuff.
one of the best things about NeHe''s site is that it doesn''t drop people in straight away, there''s lots of simple tutorials to get people up to speed before they attempt the advanced stuff.



An extremely valid pointer here - more advanced topics like
loading mesh''s, bsp trees etc should be dealt with after
doing things like lights, semi-transparency, multi-texturing
etc.

quote:

For example, I noticed you''re using DrawPrimitiveUP to blit the tri''s.
surely the next tutorial step would be use of vertex buffers?
(and before a big UP versus VB debate kicks off, I''d like to quote the nVidia guys in that they say that using UP is BAD! and BATCH! BATCH! BATCH!)



Indeed - the reason for not using DrawPrimitiveUP is the fact
that internally DirectX then has to copy the vertices into
a vertex buffer to send through the pipeline - where as having
already done it is a time & speed saver.
Batching is good. In fact - the best speed saver

Note: Batching by texture is good. Batching by vertex type
is better though - if I remember correctly - swapping vertex
types in DirectX 8 is still more of a speed loss than changing
textures.


MrF.

--
Code..reboot..code..reboot..sigh!

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quote:
Original post by MrFlibble
Note: Batching by texture is good. Batching by vertex type
is better though - if I remember correctly - swapping vertex
types in DirectX 8 is still more of a speed loss than changing
textures.



Yup, vertex types (ie FVF) and vertex buffers can kill your app's speed very quickly.
plus, as I found out not so long ago, continuously swapping VB's and vertex types can create annoying memory leaks that took me a good few months trying work out the cause before I realised!

and of course when to sort vertices,and when it doesn't matter, still a valid topic as ever.



Edited by - Nutter2000 on March 16, 2001 7:26:33 AM

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Fibble and nutter, do you not realize that maybe this kid already knows all of the basics and WANTS to advance to some higher levels? Why would you automatically assume that he knows nothing about the basics and should start there...

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For your information I do know the basics. I have succesfully used textures, vertex buffers, and matrices, I understand the basic 3D principals, but I have had trouble lighting my meshes succesfully. Once I learn how to do that properly I would like to further my knowledge and learn more.

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To the guy that wanted to texture a poly with more than 4 sides... just set the coords for each vertex as if the poly was sitting on top of your square mesh.

For instance, I am plotting hexagons in my game. I don''t have the source here at work, so I can''t give the coords (damn you work, damn you to HELL!). Let''s do a triangle instead:

top: 0.5f, 0.0f
bottom-left: 0.0f, 1.0f
bottom-right: 1.0f, 1.0f

-M

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