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** Simulating Real Life physics **

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I have a project for school in which I was given a simple physics problem. The problem involves two cars. One is traveling on a road and the other car is turning onto that road. The cars collide and they each skid a certain distance and stop. What I would like to do is accurately reenact this problem in 3D. I'm got all of the data...meter length of the skid, speed of the cars. direction forces on cars, angle of skids relative to cars original position, coefficient of friction on the road and the grass off the side.... Now, I would like to be able to do a 3D simulation of this using 2 car models (which I've already made)....I dont need damage effect or anything, just a short little animation of the two cars bouncing off eachother and than "skidding" to a stop. What should I use to do this?? So far I've been trying to figure out how to do this using Torque Game Engine...But it appears that it doesn't have anything involving plugging in the coefficient (the u thing) of friction.

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What's your level of programming knowledge? What's your level of physics knowledge?

If your aim is to use a game to solve your homework for you it's not going to work. You'll need to understand the physics _before_ you can make the computer do it (even using a pre-made physics package you need to understand the physics before you can set your problem up).

If you're just interested in simulating this because it sounds fun or interesting you could look into a physics API like PhysX.

I'm not sure what support Torque has for physics but I suspect you are looking for something where you just plug in the numbers and it all just happens; that doesn't exist. Any solution will require you to do a decent amount of programming and know a good deal of physics to set up.

You might check out Ogre3D also. It's an open source game engine that I believe has a built in physics component.

You could probably also achieve this by doing a mod to Half-Life2 or any other moddable game with a decent physics simulation.

-me

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Ogre3D is not a game engine, it is just a rendering engine, but they do have an ODE wrapper that wraps nicely around the Ogre framework. You might be able to set up a nice simulation using that. Use Ogre to load your car meshes, set up a simple little scene, and then work out the sim using Ode. For what the limitations on OgreODE is, they are the same as normal ODE.

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I'm not interested in figuring out homework answers. I already have them. But part of the project is to present my answers in some in class. What better way than a 3D simulation?

I don't want to spend too much time on this and I don't own very many computer games that have widely available mods and good physics engines. I'm not interested in spending more than 4-6 hours on making the simulation all together.

My physics expertise is rather basic..as for programming..I'm well rounded.

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If time is critical it may be simpler to do a 2D simulation with a top down view. If you have access to it I would suggest Flash/ActionScript. It's fairly easy to learn, easy to work with graphics, and thus easy to get something up and running quickly.

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This topic is 4021 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

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