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DeathLetum

Dont like reading

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DeathLetum    127
Alright lets say i dont like reading because it puts me to sleep. What other choice do i have to learn C++? The main reason why i dont like reading Books about C++ is because most the books are not oriented around games. If i had a book that could teach me C++ by using games as examples. like arrays could be for monster list or something. When i say games i dont mean card game, im talking along the type rpg and mmorpg basicly computer games.

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AerosolBeard    122
I guess it would be almost impossible trying to learn C++ without reading. I should imagine there are no audio books available, as reading out many chunks of example source code would be a bit strange, and probably not very helpful.
Obviously you can take programming courses and attend lectures, but you will still need to do some backround reading yourself, and read the lecture slides.

Best bet is to work through basic example programs and tutorials, however some reading will still be involved. Unless you have a friend who is an expert C++ programmer and is willing to talk you through it, i can't see how it can be done without reading books.

There are C++ books available that are targetted at game developers, such as "C++ for game programmers" by Noel Llopis which i have read and reccommend, however books such as this require some knowledge of C++ before reading.

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Palidine    1315
I'd say you're in a lot of trouble. Books are where so much information comes from. Personally, I end up buying a programming book every single time i go into a bookstore and I've been programming for >15 years now.

Perhaps, though you are actually trying to read the books instead of reading a bit then trying to program the examples.

You will not find many teach yourself to program book that is related to games because programming games requires that you already know how to program. i.e. you don't see "learn to read" books that are based on an analysis of Shakespeare. Shakespeare requires that you already know how to read: so you learn to read by reading Dick and Jane and such. Similarly, you learn to program by writing "hello world" and "convert celsius to degrees" programs; yes they're idotic.

If you need more direction perhaps while you are working through the programming book you can be trying to write a text based RPG with what you've learned from the chapter you are currently working on.

-me

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@root    122
To be a little blunt: If you can't make the effort to read, you can basically give up. Reading is an essential part of learning a programming language.

But, when you say you _are_ willing to read if the material is more game related, there are some books you could read:
"Beginning C++ Game Programming" which is a good book, in my opinion.
"Beginning C ++ Through Game Programming, 2nd Ed" which I haven't read yet.
I'm sure there are a few othe books as well.

Keep in mind, though, that these books won't teach you how to make the next WoW, Quake 4 or <insert bestselling game>. Their purpose is to teach you the basics of C++ in a game-oriented setting. When you are completely done with one or more of these books, you will need to read more, in order to become a more proficient programmer.

Also if you are reading a text that you find boring: try to learn small bits at a time and incorporate them into a small(!) game. Maybe you can keep things a little more exciting this way?

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DeathLetum    127
oh ya for sure im just looking for a way to get a good stable base on C++ before i get into my program at school. Also i dont intend to make a WoW game or quake 3 since its nearly imposible alone with almost no money lol. So ya im down to earth about this stuff i just dont like reading stuff that aint in a context i can relate too. not sure if you get what i mean.

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@root    122
I think I get what you mean. In that case I'd personally recommend you to purchase one of the two books I mentioned (I think the latter is the 2nd edition of the first). I think "Beginning C++ Game Programming" handles the basics really well and is very 'readable'.

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@root    122
Again, a warning: The second book might be the second edition of the first book. I'm not sure, since the titles differ by one word. They are written by the the same author and released by the same publisher. So, please verify this before you buy them both.
I would be a waste if you bought them both, just to find out they're practically the same :)

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SirSmokey    229
Maybe you should just get something like "Game programming all in one" or something like that. Those types of books tend to move along really fast and useally give a C++ primer in the beginning and keep all the examples in a game context. This is the type of book I first bought when I started getting interested in making my own games. Pure C++ programming books are hard on a beginner because you can't understand exactly how what is begin taught in the book relates to programming a game (when you have deeper questions about making games that is). So you might want to start off with one of those game programming books for beginners. They aren't the greatest resource for actually teaching C++ or any other language but they will get you started with something you find interesting. Later on, as I have found, after you start on your own game you begin to forget about making a game and become more interested in actually porgramming... anything, and making it work. That's when you begin to crack open those hard core C++ books that are dry as dust and begin to find them real interesting. Also, take books slow, don't read too much in one sitting, it's a waste of time. You can only absorb so much information at once, and to really have what you've been taught sink in you have to practise, and this means sitting down and programming. Don't spend your night reading 300 pages of a book, you'll forget 90% of it the next day. YOur time will be better spent actually trying to write some code.

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TheShadow344    167
Since you expressed interest in RPG-type games, I would recommend purchasing "Programming Role-Playing Games with DirectX" by Jim Adams (I think it's in its second edition, but I'm not entirely sure) after you think you can manage programs of moderate-to-hard difficulty. Even though it only uses DirectX, many of the ideas and practices could be easily "ported" over to OpenGL / SDL / whatever if that becomes your fancy.

"Data Structures for Game Programmers" by Ron Penton is also a good book for learning about complex data structures in a game-oriented setting (it even uses an array to store a monster list!). The book teaches you how to create your own data structures, so it will have you reinventing the wheel initially (the first few chapters cover data structures available in the Standard Template Library (STL) such as std::vector and std::list), but it is still a good read.

There are many other books that are worth investing some time and money in, but a simple Internet search should give you more than enough to look at. Hope this helps.

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mutex    1111
I actually have a terrible time reading books, and this is after 10 years of coding. I can't sit still and digest large amounts of material in one sitting.

What I find works better are tutorials or perhaps small books with tons of examples, and work through them and refer to the book when you're stuck. I've learned programming languages primarily through experimentation, online reference documentation, and short tutorials.

Also, you seem really eager to start with games. It might be easier to find another type of program you'd enjoy writing that is simpler.

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erissian    727
I was going to make a smart ass comment here, but you probably wouldn't have read this far. :)

Alright, with that out of the way:
I can understand that programming books aren't exactly the kind of book that you read from cover to cover in the park. Your best best is to find a tutorial on some website somewhere, with easy to digest nuggets of information. A lot of tutorials step you through useful things, and you only have to look over them for a few minutes before they get to the point, and you have something you can apply.
Also, I've seen a lot of people post things like "Looking for a mentor!" on this board. Maybe you can get someone with some sort of IM and a lot of time to spare.

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