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The Top Ten reasons NOT to create a MMO.

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Hobbiest are you? Enjoy making games you say? Planing for your next BIG project to be a MMO? Well for all those hobbiest , intent on carving out their own slice of the MMO business, stop one moment, and consider these ten reasons why you might NOT want your next project to be a MMO... Reason #1: MMOs are popping up, and spreading like wildfires; between such titles as "Everquest", "WoW", and "Runescape", theres little left in terms of players. Reason #2: The level of competition, and quality of games, put features development out of the hands of anything but MAJOR gaming companies. With price tags that range in the millions annually, setting up a MMO, even a small one, is the least of your financial worries. Reason #3: Ideas flow freely, and word-of-mouth spreads fast. The only thing quicker (and slicker) is a TEAM of well paid lawyers. If your going to provide any competition, be prepared to face heavy litigation costs; if not for legitimate reasons, then at least to run your development team out of budget. After all, money makes the world go round, and if your broke, then your competitors need not worry about you, right? Reason # 4: Theres no such thing as "start small, end big" with MMOs. In fact, most of the time you "Start big", and NEVER end, but end up "HUGE". What I'm saying is, combining player base, server load, customer services, and what not, development never truly ends. MMOs, even small ones (150+ players) require constant monitoring, costing you serious money, time, and effort. Besides if your going to even START at all, you have to have the money to begin with, never mind the rest. Reason # 5: Thinking you might use the "extra" cash from subscriber payout, to develop new games, or updates? Think again. Several 3rd party research groups have shown conclusive data that over the past few years (and many years to come), players have grown steadily more wary of using credit cards, and personal information to foot MMO subscription bills. Unless your prepared with a convenient, and costly, subscription method (such as pay by phone?), be prepared to lose many potential players on the out-set. Reason # 6: Whats "good" is not exactly nice. Don't rely on anything except the best. I myself once thought that I could make a MMO. Having neither programming, nor animation skills to note at the time, I purchased pre-made media (and wasted a good $900). What did this get me, and where will it get you? Knee deep in "single distribution" license disputes. Take it from me, and just hire a 3D artist from the start. Reason # 7: Just like generic ideas won't get you far, neither will tools. With the amount of MMOs in existence, or production, only the best media, and the freshest techniques/ideas will be used. Don't expect anything less from companies willing to toss in millions of dollars if it means success. Whats this mean? If you want to compete, best to toss out the notion of using generic physics engines, or tools such as "Milkshape". (no offense to Milkshape fans intended:) Reason # 8: Your player base is NOT your friends, not even your player admins, nor your mods. This will become apparent with any amateur MMO. Yes they exist, no most of them are not decent. Companies regularly get lawsuits related to personal ownership issues having to do with virtual property. It's a fuzzy issue at best. Also players will BOMBARD what little customer service you have, with complaints, or disputes over bugs. Again you might face lawsuits, or threats therein. Often amateur MMOs are developed on little to no budget, with volunteer teams. Expect to get LOTS of hate mail, or related fluff from players dissatisfied because of grievers, beta-character loss, personal problems, angry parents, and such. Reason # 9: Ok, suppose you do have all the parts assembled, some volunteer customer service, personally trained, as well as MMO quality graphics, and media. You've even produced your own graphics, and physics engine! Ahhh...Then comes securing...1.Hardware, and 2.Copyrights/Patents on all software, media, and content. The VITAL, as you cannot run your game without hardware (plus of coarse bandwidth license). And while the first is vital, the second will far outstrip the firsts importance, solely in cost. No not even production cost, but copyright/patent costs. You know what the average patent costs? $100, and at least 2 weeks to receive, two weeks off of development time. Copyrights take a similar amount of time, but only cost $25. All of this equates again, to a huge budget. Reason # 10: By making a MMO you are further promoting the current backslide of gaming entertainment into the trash heap. Yep, I said it. Virtually ALL MMOs out on the net are a trash heap. WHY? Really only for 2 reasons... 1. Because corporate bigwigs think tossing money at a problem will solve it which is the main reason many poor game concepts remain undeveloped in even major MMOs. Several prominent MMOs have been shut down simply because they don't bring in enough revenue. 2. The market has grown well beyond its potential, and like oil production, is facing a sharp decline in popularity within the coming years. There are OTHER reasons I could mention of coarse, such as the fact that I HATE MMOs:P But really MMOs are a disgrace to the ART of Game Design simply because the development pipeline, and concept of development does not conform to the concept that is a MMO. By, and large, MMOs revolve around a abstract concept called "progress" often marked as "XP", or "Levels". Other conventions based around progress include unlocking various new items/areas/customizations, based on in-game wealth, or training "Skills/abilities" to a certain peak value. The whole concept of progress through leveling carries over heavily from the RPG genres as most anybody can tell you. But what is the RPG genre? Lets break it down. RPG stands for "Roleplaying Game", which is roughly equated to a bunch of modules, one for story, one for character, and one for environment. Nine out of ten RPGs to date, are in the "Fantasy" genre, meaning they include "magic", "mysticism", "dragons", "Kingdoms", and lands locked in the medieval age. Swords, and wizards are a staple, but of late we can see some variety. The story module of the RPG is essentially the text portion, that sets the scene for what is to transpire, and gets the player accustom to the new environment. The environment module includes NPCs (Non-player-characters), monsters, weather, and any other component of the players immediate surroundings that may have a effect on the players character. Normally in a RPG the player must go on a epic quest, where something of great proportions (i.e. "the world") is threatened by some extreme danger (destruction, plague, hostile takeover by demon armies). Normally the enemy is one of great power, and magnitude. Throughout the interactive story (i.e. the game) the player will often be faced with a complex sub-plot to add flavor to the RPG. Most, if not all of the complex sub-plots are ties in, or ARE a mini-quest/quest. Even more frequent are the rewards, celebrations, and general kudos handed to the player via the "Grateful" NPCs, for the players success in saving them. However maybe it's best I return to the topic of MMOs? Do you see why MMOs just don't fit the RPG genre? No? Yes? Well, I'll explain anyway... The REASON MMOs just don't fit the RPG genre is, simply put, players of RPGs feel "special", and play to be unique, or on-top-of-the-world. In a MMO, "all players participate in a active, and ever changing virtual environment"(all though the "ever changing" part hardly ever proves to be true). In this we are presented with a special problem. Players come to MMOs based on the RPG concept, expecting to feel unique, and be the best; to save the world, and become rich, famous, etc, etc. What happens then when you end up with oh say...40,000+ players thinking they can be the best, or feeling unique? You piss a lot of people off, waste many others time, contribute to making the internet a vast, and empty waste land (a-la "tv"), and help to promote obesity:) After all, how fun is it to slay the dragon, and save the princess after you just watched like 20+ other players do the same? Games are supposed to be about yourself, about suspension of disbelief, and with the above happening more, and more frequently in MMOs its no wonder many players are complaining. The RPG concept just does not work, in MMOs!Whats worse is the developers turn around, and compensate by saying "you can be the best, if only you spend the most time repeating the same, shallow actions over, and over, then you'll be the best!" So basically developers are saying, "in order to enjoy our game, you first must spend at least 1,000+ hours repeating the same action over, and over". To top it off, they PREVENT the sales of accounts on popular auction websites like "eBay" citing every body has to "Earn" there way in game. What if I don't want to. What if I just want to pay, play, and enjoy myself? But again, I'm getting off focus. The point is there are many "twilight" areas when it comes to judgment calls in the process of developing MMOs, and making one wrong call, can severely damage the game in question. Do you really want that burden? Do you really want that responsibility? Finally, do you really want to literally work your self to death? Because to truly develop ANY thing of MMO quality without a absolutely MASSIVE budget is like asking, no, BEGGING to have carved into your grave stone "R.I.P hear lies Joe Somebody, Died of drinking to many espressos while making something he NEVER COULD finish". Granted there have been a few games that where successful, made by small groups. But as the years roll by, and technology gets more advanced, such days will soon come to pass into myth. Actually I can think of one EXTREMELY skilled group of 4 people that HAVE created a MMO, and are still running it to date. Can't seem to think of it off the top of my head; but let me warn you, to do something like that even with 4 people as highly talented as they where, is like walking on water in the gaming industry...impossible, maybe...chances of occurring again...nil. So as my final adieu, all of the above is just a small fraction of why you DON'T want to develop a MMO. Remember next time you decide to start your next big project, the words contained herein, and they might save you your life:) [Edited by - Iron Will on January 26, 2007 8:24:14 AM]

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I would say you've got some valid points even though your personal taste in games interfer with the objectivity a bit here ;) (but who doesn't?).

Quote:
Original post by Iron Will
In this we are presented with a special problem. Players come to MMOs based on the RPG concept, expecting to feel unique, and be the best; to save the world, and become rich, famous, etc, etc.


I beg to differ. You're not talking about the RPG concept, but the CRPG Cliché. One thing that MMORPGs bring to the table is the fact that there are other sentient beings in the world. In a pnp RPG those sentient beings are being played by the gamemaster, in the MMORPGs they're played by other players. You are NOT unique and you must think before you do something stupid - you can't rely on the crappy AI.

One of the things that actually irritates me when it comes to CRPGS is that in almost all of them you're an omnipotent being which doesn't have to answer to anyone (at least after a couple of level advancements). Not that I don't enjoy playing those games, but they're not really RPGs to me - they're hack and slash levelling games.

I believe that MMORPGs might actually be able to bring the RP back into RPG. I know that there are many hack and slash MMORPGs out there but I've got the impression that there are also some games which add the RPG feeling into them - where you have to play a role, not only kill everything that moves or transport an item from one location to another.

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haha. very entertaining ;) you know, i had this idea for an immense multiplayer online diversion program. would you be interested....

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Top reason to create an MMO: because you want to.

Sure, you might fail. In fact, you might fail on your first 50 attempts. But if you really want to, you'll keep trying, and one day you'll get there. The spate of people discouraging others from trying anything basically "because it's hard" is getting a little tedious. If you have decided that making an MMO is not feasible for you, fine. Let someone else try - and fail, or succeed. And learn from that failure, or success.

I think there's just too much whining about what other people should do and not enough doing around here. Pontificating on the viability of MMOs has replaced proposing game designs - and actually building the games. Pity.

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So people should just not try?
where is the fun in that, anyone thats looked into mmorpg, should have realized most of the issues that come up, and should be prepared to deal with them

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(First Game Designers Sin)Confusing RPGs with CRPGs:)
I agree that I might be pressing my opinion, but tell me, how many advertisements do you see for MMOs that state something to the affect of "Level, Make friends, become rich, or famous, conquer fierce dragons...", and so on, and so on? Does this not imply "unique" or "Special" in the adds then?

Its true MMOs might bring back the RP in RPG, but essentially "roleplaying" has been a text/oral system of play, and is adapted as such.
How should the gaming industry go about making a MMO that actually promotes RP?
Perhaps voice chat? Of coarse bandwidth comes into play...

And your right Oluseyi, people SHOULD stop whining about what what other people should do. Of coarse most of the whining done because the people that ACTUALLY know what to do are not the people controlling the purse strings, so to speak.

I guess theres always the alternative...walking on water:)

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Quote:
Nine out of ten RPGs to date, are in the "Fantasy" genre, meaning they include "magic", "mysticism", "dragons", "Kingdoms", and lands locked in the midieval age. Swords, and wizards are a staple, but of late we can see some variety.


Personally I think fantasy and sci-fi are the most overused genres around right now. While I'm not a big MMO player I always thought it would be cool if someone could do something like a noir style MMO. I didn't play City of Heros/Villains but I thought it was a really cool idea and would definitely give it a shot if I had the time and money. It's not that I think all fantasy/sci-fi games are bad, it just makes me happy to see a little more variety. But I suppose those are the current fad genres that make money.

One thing that does bug me is that most MMORPG's tend to look the same to someone who doesn't play very many of them. I had seen once where someone compiled a single screenshot from at least 30 different MMORPG's and only a few of them looked like they had a distinct style to me.

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What do each of you think the Fantasy Genre, (specifically in the MMO domain), needs in order to be livened up a bit?

The main thing that many of my buddies have been mentioning is less of a focus on the individual, and more of a focus on the group.
THAT however is already happening...

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Quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
Top reason to create an MMO: because you want to.


YES! I'm amazed by how many people on this site would rather make fun of others attempts to accomplish something, rather than attempting to assist in their accomplishments. I think it's better to try, and fail, and learn from your failures than to take the "Ho hum, it's going to suck, so I'd better not try" attitude. It is interesting to note that I don't see this as much on my other favorite game development site (garagegames.com), as it seems to be alot more popular to break people down on this site.

Quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
I think there's just too much whining about what other people should do and not enough doing around here.


Q. to the mother F.'in E. I recently entered a contest on gamedev, my entry is no where near a polished AAA game, but I don't care. I at least have something to show for my efforts, and the amount of satisfaction in seeing a project that you had fun developing and completing is immeasurable.

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On the other hand, it does get frustrating to forever see people obviously biting off more than they can chew, and asking the helpers on this forum to do all the work for them. I'm much more inclined to help people who have a chance of success, and typically I associate wanting to make an MMO-style game with a minimal chance of success. It's usually easy to see which category someone falls into though, and I don't think long lectures to the 'no hope' category are going to make significantly more difference than a short note on what they need to research first.

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i think the basis of the noobies wanting to do mmo's is not because its "too hard", but because its too easy to talk with a bunch of other people online and totally underestimate the complexity of everything since its a first project. If every beginner game developer didn't think to make a 3d mmo thats "BETTER!" then WoW, there wouldn't be any threads bitching about it like this one.

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But herein lies the trap. You think MMO development (without a budget) is fun until you really get going. Have you ever seen your best friends fingers BLEED from programming? No? Neither have I:)
But its a sad day when game development stops being fun; might as well warn everyone now.

Granted, I'm not suggesting anyone stop designing there latest game, what I'm basically saying is,if you decide to develop a MMO, know the reasons that your NOT developing it for.

DON'T develop a MMO on your own, or in a small group (with little funding) if your looking to make money off of it. Develop your projects for FUN, and for future knowledge. Going into something bigger then you can Handel will ultimately lead to failure, and frustration.

Develop for fun...not for funds...

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Most, if not all great things were created by people who didn't hesitate to DO.

Kids who want to create the next big MMO may fail very early in their efforts. People who put more time into it, may at some step realize the real effort that is required to finish the thing. And the pigheaded who really create something playable may fail at the marketing and investments to create the business and keep it running. But they all learn something, because they tried and failed. And some may even have success at some level.

Personally, I failed at a rather early stage. But it was ok, I learned new stuff while working on it.

Nay-sayers do not move anything. Nay-sayers do never change things. You may stop people from starting with unrealistic ideas. But thats all of what you change. And then? Should they watch more TV instead? ;-)


Well, personally I do not like MMORPG games. Because its just not my thing. I played web based strategy titles, and then I realized it ate up way too much of my time. This was fun, but time consuming.

But, I really would like to see new things in the MMO market. Real (not web) MMO strategy titles would be interesting.

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I would agree with the OP that a lot of people play an MMO and think, "Wow, I could make one of those and get rich!" I think that's a bad approach to do any of this.

However, as a technical problem to overcome, an MMO is a fascinating one. Granted, you'd probably have to "level up" first by writing Pong, then a Tetris clone, and so forth. The eventual challenge of dealing with the requirements of an MMO certainly appeals to the nerd in me. Now, perhaps there is some fudge on the exact definition of the first 'M' in MMO, but in a few years, I'd love to work on one for fun just as a learning experience. To do it, you'd have to be sharp in certain programming areas.

Non technical related, it's true though that there isn't much RP in MMO's. It's not too hard to go kill x creatures with a crappy drop rate. What you say and do doesn't actually affect anything. It would be rad if, say in WoW for instance, borders changed. What if you could storm Stormwind and make it a Horde location?

Someone should also make an MMO where if you die you can't respawn. The character is just gone and dead. That'd change gameplay a bit.

Probably wouldn't sell either.

Anyway, to all people who just learned HTML and want to put together an MMO with Runescape/WoW graphics, since you're going to try it anyway despite what everyone says, best of luck. I hope you learn something in the process and don't give up on the game-making process if it doesn't pan out. That'd be like not exercising ever because you can't run a two marathons in the same day the first day you start. "He is a fool who did nothing because he could only do a little."

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Quote:
Original post by Iron Will
What do each of you think the Fantasy Genre, (specifically in the MMO domain), needs in order to be livened up a bit?


Nudity.

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The biggest reason for me is simply that I'm tired of hearing about them. [grin]

But, aside from that, I would have to agree with most of the others. Make what you are interested in... that vast majority of games are going to fail regardless. Make what you are passionate about, and let the chips fall where they may. You are more likely to succeed following your dream than following the money.

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Quote:
Original post by Robert Frunzke
Most, if not all great things were created by people who didn't hesitate to DO.

Kids who want to create the next big MMO may fail very early in their efforts. People who put more time into it, may at some step realize the real effort that is required to finish the thing. And the pigheaded who really create something playable may fail at the marketing and investments to create the business and keep it running. But they all learn something, because they tried and failed. And some may even have success at some level.



9/10 times going from zero to attempt creation of a mmo will result in COMPLETE failure and not much if anything will be learned of that experience. A simple tetris or platformer game will put someone in perspective REAL quick about the problems game development have and what it takes to overcome them. I just try to persuade beginners to make a simple game for the fact it brings in much more enjoyment and knowledge then burning yourself out and wasting other peoples time trying to make something impossible.

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i honestly think many aspiring developers have a distorted view of what kind of skills a certain undertaking requires as opposed to what their current potential is or what resources they have available.

i honestly would love to see a MMO (fantasy or not) focus more on the impact players have on the economy, and not have "<insert item here> worth <price> because the drop rate is <percent>".

granted, there are other factors, but my point is that there are other ways to improve your character than kill kill kill (atleast this is how ive seen a couple of the last huge mmos).

from what ive heard, vanguard:soh does allow you to stray away from the "dragon-slaying hero" mold.

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interesting read... however

have you personally made an MMO game? I appreciate you may have studied the information, statistics etc... but if you haven't actually tried how would you really know? I agree that most people greatly underestimate the complexity of such projects but if you have the skills there shouldn't be any reason to stop anyone trying, so you fail? so what? atleast you tried!

I think we need more positivity around here because it's actually getting me down reading about all these posts to stop other people trying.

as I say, if you've NEVER tried you will NEVER know!

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Quote:
Original post by Virtual X
interesting read... however

have you personally made an MMO game? I appreciate you may have studied the information, statistics etc... but if you haven't actually tried how would you really know? I agree that most people greatly underestimate the complexity of such projects but if you have the skills there shouldn't be any reason to stop anyone trying, so you fail? so what? atleast you tried!

I think we need more positivity around here because it's actually getting me down reading about all these posts to stop other people trying.

as I say, if you've NEVER tried you will NEVER know!


Most of the posts aren't necesarilly "stop trying" but rather, "try it this way first and things will be much easier for you in the future". For some reason a lot of people will either ignore that advice or take it as a personal insult or challenge. The problem is that for some reason people post that over and over when one or maybe even two posts is enough to get that point across.

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Top Five Reasons to NOT create an anti-MMO thread
------------------------------------------------

5) Anti-MMO threads are popping up and spreading like wildfires; theres nothing here that hasn't been said a hundred times before.

4) They promote flame wars.

3) Most of the people who want to start an MMO will learn the difficulty and change to something simpler on their own.

2) The experienced people who are actually succeeding in making a hobbyist MMO are afraid to post here in fear of getting ridiculed.

1) The people crazy enough to start a hobbyist MMO aren't listening anyway.


In a "Looking for an MMO team" thread, I have no problem with people suggesting to start smaller (I do the same). But the anti-MMO topics are starting to get old. Everybody knows that some board members are against hobbyist MMO development, you don't have to keep saying it over and over and over...

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Quote:
Original post by JBourrie
Top Five Reasons to NOT create an anti-MMO thread
------------------------------------------------


Rating++ worthy.

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So much negative vibes... Just a post to create some silver lining:

Quote:
Reason #1:
MMOs are popping up, and spreading like wildfires; between such titles as "Everquest", "WoW", and "Runescape", theres little left in terms of players.

Just because there are already a lot of MMORPG's out there, doesn't mean there's not* room for more. It could mean that, in order to have some success and recognition, you will have to stand out of the crowd in some way. This could be innovative gameplay, unique features, a very distinct theme etc.
If you are right, why would anyone ever make another first person shooter, a realtime strategy game or a racing game? It's been done before, players already bought these types of games in the past, so no one will every try out a new one?
Would me stupid for me to start a company that builds websites, just because I would not be the only one in the world?

Quote:
Reason #2:
The level of competition, and quality of games, put features development out of the hands of anything but MAJOR gaming companies. With price tags that range in the millions annually, setting up a MMO, even a small one, is the least of your financial worries.


See #1. It's true that I've you plan is too get rich as fast as possible, you shouldn't start developing a MMORPG. In fact, you probably should stay out of game development business entirely. But from what I have seen on the "Help Wanted" forum threads, it is not the money that drives most people. It's because they love to play and/or create games. I can call them naive and you would probably be right, but I love people pursuing a dream, no matter how impossible.

Quote:
Reason #3:
Ideas flow freely, and word-of-mouth spreads fast. The only thing quicker
(and slicker) is a TEAM of well paid lawyers. If your going to provide any competition, be prepared to face heavy litigation costs; if not for legitimate reasons, then at least to run your development team out of budget. After all, money makes the world go round, and if your broke, then your competitors need not worry about you, right?


Quote:
Reason # 4:
Theres no such thing as "start small, end big" with MMOs. In fact, most of the time you "Start big", and NEVER end, but end up "HUGE". What I'm saying is, combining player base, server load, customer services, and what not, development never truly ends. MMOs, even small ones (150+ players) require constant monitoring, costing you serious money, time, and effort. Besides if your going to even START at all, you have to have the money to begin with, never mind the rest.

You can start small, and you should. It would not be "massive" from the start, but you could build a online RPG for a hundred players or so and take it from there. All you would need is a server and a small team of skilled individuals. I am not implying building such a system is easy, I am just saying it is not completely impossible.

Quote:
Reason # 5:
Thinking you might use the "extra" cash from subscriber payout, to develop new games, or updates? Think again. Several 3rd party research groups have shown conclusive data that over the past few years (and many years to come), players have grown steadily more wary of using credit cards, and personal information to foot MMO subscription bills. Unless your prepared with a convenient, and costly, subscription method (such as pay by phone?), be prepared to lose many potential players on the out-set.


All very true. Like I said, don't expect to become a billionair by making a MMORPG. Do it because you have a passion for making games, and start out small.

Quote:
Reason # 6:
Whats "good" is not exactly nice. Don't rely on anything except the best. I myself once thought that I could make a MMO. Having neither programming, nor animation skills to note at the time, I purchased pre-made media (and wasted a good $900). What did this get me, and where will it get you? Knee deep in "single distribution" license disputes.
Take it from me, and just hire a 3D artist from the start.

If I would meet someone on the verge of buying $900 worth of content, with no solid plan or skills, I would make sure he reads your post. I'm being sincere here.
However, I don't think you always need the absolute-most-amazing-artwork-evar. I have seen my fair share of screenshots from Second Life showing the most horrible 3d models, and people seem to enjoy that regardless. But you do want to find someone you can do some decent modeling.

Quote:
Reason # 7:
Just like generic ideas won't get you far, neither will tools. With the amount of MMOs in existence, or production, only the best media, and the freshest techniques/ideas will be used. Don't expect anything less from companies willing to toss in millions of dollars if it means success. Whats this mean? If you want to compete, best to toss out the notion of using generic physics engines, or tools such as "Milkshape". (no offense to Milkshape fans intended:)

See #6. Besides, I would think there are some very decent free/cheap 3d modeling software and physics engines out there that. But then again, I have never made an attempt to create a MMORPG, so what do I know? [smile]

Quote:
Reason # 8:
Your player base is NOT your friends, not even your player admins, nor your mods. This will become apparent with any amateur MMO. Yes they exist, no most of them are not decent. Companies regularly get lawsuits related to personal ownership issues having to do with virtual property. It's a fuzzy issue at best.
Also players will BOMBARD what little customer service you have, with complaints, or disputes over bugs. Again you might face lawsuits, or threats therein. Often amateur MMOs are developed on little to no budget, with volunteer teams. Expect to get LOTS of hate mail, or related fluff from players dissatisfied because of grievers, beta-character loss, personal problems, angry parents, and such.

Some players will get angry with you. But is that really a reason not to create a game?

Quote:
Reason # 9:
Ok, suppose you do have all the parts assembled, some volunteer customer service, personally trained, as well as MMO quality graphics, and media. You've even produced your own graphics, and physics engine! Ahhh...Then comes securing...1.Hardware, and 2.Copyrights/Patents on all software, media, and content. The VITAL, as you cannot run your game without hardware
(plus of coarse bandwidth license). And while the first is vital, the second will far outstrip the firsts importance, solely in cost. No not even production cost, but copyright/patent costs. You know what the average patent costs? $100, and at least 2 weeks to receive, two weeks off of development time. Copyrights take a similar amount of time, but only cost $25. All of this equates again, to a huge budget.

That why I would suggest to start out small. Hardware and bandwidth is not that expensive, only if you expect to have 100,000 players from day one. Which would be unrealistic anyway.

Quote:
Reason # 10:
By making a MMO you are further promoting the current backslide of gaming entertainment into the trash heap. Yep, I said it. Virtually ALL MMOs out on the net are a trash heap. WHY? Really only for 2 reasons...
1. Because corporate bigwigs think tossing money at a problem will solve it
which is the main reason many poor game concepts remain undeveloped in even major MMOs. Several prominent MMOs have been shut down simply because they
don't bring in enough revenue.

I don't think making a game makes me responsible for other people's failures. Even if it is a very bad game.


I wasn't quite sure what all the rambling after the initial top 10 was about, I think the post could have done without it. If you don't like MMORPG's, don't play them. At least that is what I do, I don't even like regular single player offline RPG's.

* edit: oops forgot the all important word "not" here, i meant the opposite :/

[Edited by - WanMaster on January 26, 2007 10:32:00 AM]

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Quote:
Original post by WanMaster
So much negative vibes... Just a post to create some silver lining:

Quote:
Reason #1:
MMOs are popping up, and spreading like wildfires; between such titles as "Everquest", "WoW", and "Runescape", theres little left in terms of players.

Just because there are already a lot of MMORPG's out there, doesn't mean there's is room for more. It could mean that, in order to have some success and recognition, you will have to stand out of the crowd in some way. This could be innovative gameplay, unique features, a very distinct theme etc.
If you are right, why would anyone ever make another first person shooter, a realtime strategy game or a racing game? It's been done before, players already bought these types of games in the past, so no one will every try out a new one?

If you take a look at the text mmrpg community which is a much easier game type to develop there's about 1600(see www.mudconnect.com) game servers online. Most of them aren't commercial and compete on having good playability and communities. Some servers have very few players. The goal might not be to make the most popular rpg, but to have fun develop it and try "new stuff".

There's a lot of cool stuff happening in the "forgotten" text mmrpg community. A lot of the popular concepts in the big graphical mmrpgs was invented years ago in text gaming.

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All valid points. I'll keep your comments in mind next time I write any post here on GameDev.net, seeing how most of you have been around for some time
~Thanks.

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