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Making an rpg.

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I'm only 13 years old. And i cant wait till high school. Plz, anyone who know were i can find a tutorial that will tell me how to make an rpg from the basics. I dunno what language i should use: C#,C,C++, OpenGl, DirectX. ive heard theese is the best. atm i want it to be singel player. if it become good maybe i will set it online. Here is some info about the game. I want it to be in 3D. a big map. I want theese classes : Druid, Warlock, Mage, Warrior, Assasin and Priest. I want theese races : Humans, Dwarves and Elves. and ofc all the classes will have spells. I want to make quests, Traders in the woods, banks, professions, etc. Thanks for reading //Feelay [Edited by - Feelay on January 27, 2007 9:32:08 AM]

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Quote:
Original post by Feelay
Plz, anyone who know were i can find a tutorial that will tell me how to make an rpg from the basics and up.
...
...
if i become good maybe i will set it online.
....


And there we go again.....

Anyways, your best chance is to pick up a book on programming. C# is a good language to begin with. C++ is more difficult to learn. Try to become a wizard at programming first [smile]. Understand OOP concepts. Then try your hand at OpenGL/DirectX/XNA.

Complete this much first, then take it ahead from there...

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Original post by _neutrin0_
Quote:
Original post by Feelay
...
...
if i become good maybe i will set it online.
....

Sorry i ment it, not i. I have changed that now.
Quote:
Original post by _neutrin0_

Anyways, your best chance is to pick up a book on programming. Complete this


I am trying to find a book about game programming, but the problem is that it isnt easy to find a book in english about game programming, and the swedish books sux.

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Game Programming for Teens

I haven't use the book myself, but I have heard its good. Maybe someone else who as actually used it can tell more about it.

Check out the For Beginners section on this site.

Don't aim for an RPG right away. RPGs, especially like the onces you are talking about are difficult to make even for a experienced team of developers. Try to make simple games and try getting your programming skills and basics right first. Keep smaller goals, like maybe making a tetris or a break-out clone for start. Then slowly progress to more complex stuff.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Don't get a game programming book, thats far too advanced now. Get a book for beggining your programming language of choice.

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Maybe yoy're right. Maybe i shouldnt start with an rpg. But the problem is that i only play fantasy games, and i dont think u can make a tic tac toe or something like a fantasy game or? ;P

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Even the simplest games can be made fun by a little bit of imagination.

Yes I agree with you, RPGs are very exiting to play. We all love them, but the ones you are talking about, the truly massive ones are built by teams of very experienced people.

By all means, keep an aim and dream of making a big RPG. Just don't make it your first aim. There is no harm in dreaming big [smile]. Work towards your goal in smaller steps.

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Yes sir. :p.
I'll try to make non rpg games in c# or c++. atm im trying to find tutorials for that.

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Why not make a fantasy game? I know I'll probably get in trouble with others for encouraging you to fast, but hear me out first...

When you get into high school (or even before then), get your hands on as many programming books and programming tutorials on the net that you possibly can. The first language that I learned was Visual Basic, and then C++, but most of the basic constructs in programming languages (selection, looping, etc.) are the same, so it's just a matter of learning a different syntax.

For my final computer science class in high school, the final project was a project of my own choosing that required me to demonstrate the various techniques learned throughout the class. Now, by itself, C++ in a console application setting (which is all we learned how to do in the class) will get you nowhere when it comes to creating a graphical RPG.

This is where independent learning comes in. I learned as much as I possibly could learn in the weeks leading up to the project... advanced C++ techniques, the Standard Template Library, SDL, OpenGL, etc. When it came time to create the game, it took me three weeks to complete (and that's only because my life changed to "go to school, come home, program, go to sleep, repeat"). Three weeks of intense work (at a beginner level) allowed me to create a simple RPG-style battle system (think the old turn-based battle systems of the SNES RPGs). Looking back on it now, it was slow, buggy, and occasionally crashed, but it was good enough to get me a 100% on my project!

I wasn't without my share of pitfalls though. Initially, I was like you - I wanted 3D animation, cool particle effects, and a whole bunch of other things that I wanted to replicate from my favorite games. This never happened. I realized that, as a beginner (and with a tight timeframe), I needed to start with the basics and work my way up. Start with 2D, get something up on the screen, but whatever you do, don't quit! All of the stuff you learn on the way can be used to create that big project some day!

So, to recap...
-> choose a programming language (as others have suggested, C++ or C# are viable choices)
-> learn the basic constructs of the language - googling "<name of programming language> tutorials" or reading the GameDev.net "For Beginners" section should give you something to start with
-> learn some of the more advanced techniques of your language, and start to learn an API (SDL, OpenGL, DirectX, etc.)
-> using the knowledge of your programming language and APIs, get something on the screen (even if it's a simple triangle)
-> keep learning - there are plenty of resources on the net to help you out

Quote:
if it become good maybe i will set it online

The question is not whether or not your game will be good enough, but whether YOU will be good enough. Try not to rush into things. Keep it simple and single-player [grin].

I wish you luck, and I hope you have as much fun learning how to program as I did.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
You don't necessarily need to use C/C++/C# in order to program games because they're the 'best'. There really isn't a best language, as pretty much any language can be used to write a game. In fact, if you are just beginning to program, they may be some of the worst (well, C# isn't bad) as they have a very steep learning curve.

Instead, you may want to try starting with a much higher level language such as a scripting language (ie. Python, Ruby). These languages certainly have enough power to create a decent version of the game you are thinking about, are considerably easier to learn, and you will likely have something up in running in a fraction of the time. With many you can also you graphic APIs such as SDL and OpenGL. They also usually use C-ish syntax, so learning those languages later will be easier than just jumping it.

You should probably also consider starting with a text-based RPG, instead of a 3D one. Not only will the programming be magnitudes easier, you won't really have to worry about things like collision detection, physics, AI, and several other things, in addition to all the artwork you'll need to put together for a 3D game. Believe me, you'll have plenty to do with a single-player text based RPG.

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Thx for that :). so you mean that i still can make a 2d rpg game.

Remember what I said about rushing into things. Take it slow. Split everything up into components (program an input handling system, program an inventory management system, program a battle system, program an animation controller for sprites, etc.), and, once you think you are ready, put it all together. Basically, just make a lot of test programs that test different parts of the game who want to build, and if you design them well enough, everything should be able to seamlessly fit together later.

If you're dead set on RPGs, the book Programming Role-Playing Games with DirectX by Jim Adams is a good read. The book splits everything up into components as I have described above. However, this book assumes that you have a beginner- to intermediate-level knowledge of C++, so don't pick this one up until you've covered the basics of C++. You don't need to pick this one up in order to make an RPG - it's just one of many resources that you could possibly look at.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

EDIT: One thing I should add... Before you even start to program the specifics of your game (you mentioned races, classes, and magic spells in your initial post), you need to sit down and design every single aspect of it (putting all of your design ideas in a "design document" - all big games use them).

Be specific in your design, as it will give you a clear focus of what to want and it will be easier to program later (I say "easier" not as in the difficulty of the programming required, but "easier" as in not having to program it multiple times because of some incompatibility in your code or some other design issue). For example, what make a human different from an elf (other than their appearance)? How does a Priest differ from a Druid? What magic spells can each class use? How many different magic spells will there be? What functions do I want my bank to have (money only, or do I want the player to be able to deposit items as well)? Answering all of these questions clearly and concisely will help you to build your game.

Hope this helps.

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The problem is that in sweden, theese books dont exsist. and my parents dont like to buy things online.
don't u know any website that write theese tutorials.

---------------------------------------------
Edit:

Quote:

EDIT: One thing I should add... Before you even start to program the specifics of your game (you mentioned races, classes, and magic spells in your initial post), you need to sit down and design every single aspect of it (putting all of your design ideas in a "design document" - all big games use them).

Be specific in your design, as it will give you a clear focus of what to want and it will be easier to program later (I say "easier" not as in the difficulty of the programming required, but "easier" as in not having to program it multiple times because of some incompatibility in your code or some other design issue). For example, what make a human different from an elf (other than their appearance)? How does a Priest differ from a Druid? What magic spells can each class use? How many different magic spells will there be? What functions do I want my bank to have (money only, or do I want the player to be able to deposit items as well)? Answering all of these questions clearly and concisely will help you to build your game.

Hope this helps.



Thx for that, but ive alerdy thinked about that, i have been planning a game in almost 2 years now.


[Edited by - Feelay on January 27, 2007 11:37:17 AM]

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Original post by Feelay
The problem is that in sweden, theese books dont exsist, and my parents dont like to buy things online.
don't u know any website that write theese tutorials.


Try "Akademibokhandeln" they should have stores near your local university.
(If your local university has a CS program the bookstore will have tons of programming books in store)

in Göteborg you can find them at

1) Kungsgatan 61

2) Nordstan, Norra Hamngatan 26

3) Vasagatan 26-30

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Damn, that doesn't help matters much does it? I guess the only thing I can recommend then is to keep searching the net and keep coming back to the forums [wink]. GameDev.net has a LOT of resources as well - just browse the Articles and Resources section to see what I mean.

Like I said, you don't NEED that book to program an RPG. There are plenty of other resources out there. If you are still looking for C++ tutorials (if that is the language you picked), try CPlusPlus.com to start with. And remember...

[google]
Google is your friend!

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I was there this wednesday. i didnt find any of the books theese guys is talking about. i only found books in swedish, and they sux.

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Quote:
Original post by SimonForsman
Try "Akademibokhandeln" they should have stores near your local university.
(If your local university has a CS program the bookstore will have tons of programming books in store)

in Göteborg you can find them at

1) Kungsgatan 61

2) Nordstan, Norra Hamngatan 26

3) Vasagatan 26-30


I've been there and checked that books, the only bookstore I've found game programming books in.

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You could always try your local library. I'm sure they could get some of the books mentioned here if you ask them nicely. :)
But in my opinion, it's easier to learn how to program on the net since programming books (especially Swedish ones) usually are a few years old and the examples need some modifications to work with new/free compilers. But that's just me. :)

To find tutorials etc. here are some Swedish online communities:
cplusplus.nu
gamedev.se
pellesoft.se

EDIT: Added another link...

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Feelay, if you have not done any programing then you have a long way to go before you will start producing even 2d games, much less 3d games. Game programing is much like any other advanced skill, you need to learn a lot before you can even get started. It would be much like saying I want to do heart transplants, can someone show me a tutorial so I can get started.

The first thing you need to do is learn the basics of programing, and the basics have a lot to it. C# is not a bad choice, quiet a bit of power, free IDE and helps keep you out of some touble that C++ would give you.

Basic programming is the following (this is not an all inculusive list, I have no doubt I will leave some stuff out). How to complie and debug a program, condition statements (if, if else, switch), loops (do, do-while, for, for-each), assigments, object orrinated programming (OOP), input and output. Now each of those catagories can take a bit to really learn, OOP and input/output can take a real long time.

You need to know that before you can even start doing a game. So learn the basics and then on to the more fun stuff.

theTroll

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Im going to recommend an easier language like c# although you wont be writing your games in it, you'l learn how to program alot quicker.

C++(which the majority of games are written in) is too unrewording when learning it meaning your more likely to give up. To create graphics or windows you more or less need a complete mastory of the language whilst in c# you can create graphical appplications as you learn.

Once you know how to program learn c++(it'l be alot easier now) then when you think you understand enough of it move onto SDL http://www.libsdl.org/ library which is a good challenge to write even a simple 2d game.

I know you'l be craving 3D graphics and interested in opengl/directx but ive recently bought the book "beginning opengl game programming" and although its targetted at beginner game developers its not exactly light reading, far too advanced for someone starting programming.

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Quote:
Original post by RobN
Im going to recommend an easier language like c# although you wont be writing your games in it, you'l learn how to program alot quicker.


And, why won't you be writing games in C#? Is there some law that says you can't write games in any given language? There are games written in Fortran, BASIC, Java, Python, C, ASM, PHP.


Just what is it about C# that makes it less useful to program games in?

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Quote:
Original post by Talroth
Quote:
Original post by RobN
Im going to recommend an easier language like c# although you wont be writing your games in it, you'l learn how to program alot quicker.


And, why won't you be writing games in C#? Is there some law that says you can't write games in any given language? There are games written in Fortran, BASIC, Java, Python, C, ASM, PHP.

Just what is it about C# that makes it less useful to program games in?


Actually I want to know too. If you have doubts about C#, check out this or this thread.

//chinc

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Ok seeing as you dissaproved of my post enough to rate me down ill rephrase my recommendation:

For learning purposes you may want to use an easier language like c# although, you will not want to write your games in it due to it being an inferior language for high quality game development compared to c++.

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Quote:
Original post by RobN
Ok seeing as you dissaproved of my post enough to rate me down ill rephrase my recommendation:

For learning purposes you may want to use an easier language like c# although, you will not want to write your games in it due to it being an inferior language for high quality game development compared to c++.


and why is it inferior ?

the performance penalty you get when using JIT compilation is minimal and most middleware will use native binaries anyway. Graphics are processed by the GPU and are NOT affected by the language in any way.

Thus it is definitly possible to write comercial quality games using C# with a few native components. (such as the physics engine etc),


Very few comercial games are written 100% in C++ these days, smart developers will use better languages where it is appropriate.

as long as you're not writing your own engine you don't need to touch C++. and even if you write your own engine you will probably only benefit from using C++ for ~10% of the engine.

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