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aumudin

Hmm mvs or dev-c++

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Question if I go and use microsoft visual studio 2005 will the user have the .net framework on there comp or is there a way I can disable that? For some reason when I make a prog. then transfer it to my other computer it wants to download the framework. Or should I just go with dev-c++

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The .NET Framework is only required for .NET applications. It is possible to create completely unmanaged C++ applications that don't require the framework, with VS2005. Just select New Project > Visual C++ > Win32 > and then select either a console app or windows app, depending on what you're trying to do.

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If you followed step 4 from the Visual C++ 2005 Express download page then you'll have also downloaded and setup the Microsoft Platform SDK. If you havn't already done that then you can only develop .NET applications until you install the Platform SDK, but if you have installed it you should be able to create regular Win32 applications that do not require the .NET framework.

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Ah but with VS2005, MS has just made life alot more difficult for us. We now require our users to have installed the new VC runtimes. No longer can we just include the VS8 CRT dlls in the application folder.

And the supported way is to use an installer with the CRT merge modules. Yuck! This means people without admin privileges cannot download and run your application and more work for us to create installers for even the simplest apps.

The other way is to get your users to download the runtime from MS or you redistributing it with your app.

The most convenient is to distribute the dlls in the same folder as a private assembly which is not supported for VS Express. Great, just great.

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____This is a tough choice. On the one hand, Dev-C++ is easy to use, simple, and allows you to code mostly how you want. However, it has not received updates for almost 2 years now, so it may very well be dead in the water (though wx-Dev-C++ seems to be raising its heir). Also, it can be finicky about certain APIs when linking. Finally, it is not as feature-ful as some IDEs. To me, it just seems like a good starting IDE, particularly if you want to test out a lot of tutorial demos that may not exercise the best coding practices.
____VC++ is a professional grade IDE, with all the features that entails. It has all the tools you're likely to need to debug and organize your code. However, if you use it, then you have to code in the way that Microsoft thinks you should code. Any that doesn't comply usually gets flagged with errors, or flat-out won't be allowed to run after it is compiled. You also have to jump through a few hoops to get the Express version set up to make windows app .exe files.
____If you're willing to experiment, there's also an up-and-coming IDE called code blocks. It hasn't had an official release in years, but it has regular nightly builds with plenty of features.

In the end, just gotta do research, and see which one works best for you by trying it out.

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Quote:
Original post by GamerSg
Ah but with VS2005, MS has just made life alot more difficult for us. We now require our users to have installed the new VC runtimes. No longer can we just include the VS8 CRT dlls in the application folder.

And the supported way is to use an installer with the CRT merge modules. Yuck! This means people without admin privileges cannot download and run your application and more work for us to create installers for even the simplest apps.

The other way is to get your users to download the runtime from MS or you redistributing it with your app.

The most convenient is to distribute the dlls in the same folder as a private assembly which is not supported for VS Express. Great, just great.


You left out statically linking the runtime into the application. You simply go to Project->Properties, click on Configuration Properties then C/C++ then Code Generation then on the drop-down menu next to Runtime Library select either Multithreaded or Multithreaded Debug depending on if you're in release or debug mode. The other two options are the same except they use the dll. Of course, this means that if MS makes a newer version of this file you won't be able to use it without redistributing the program. Oh well.

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It is also perfectly possible to distribute a VS Express application with the C/C++ runtime as a private assembly. As per a post on one of the Microsoft websites, it is just a question of manually creating a manifest.

Details on this are here (in the fourth post down, by "Ted"), or fully quoted in a GameDev post here by synth_cat.

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Quote:
Original post by EasilyConfused
It is also perfectly possible to distribute a VS Express application with the C/C++ runtime as a private assembly. As per a post on one of the Microsoft websites, it is just a question of manually creating a manifest.

Details on this are here (in the fourth post down, by "Ted"), or fully quoted in a GameDev post here by synth_cat.



Ah i didnt know about that. But still, it just makes distribution a pain.

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Well codeblocks is deffinitly a option ive used it befor and liked it. As far as the microsoft visual studio 2005 like the last guy said you have to program the way they want you to. Which isnt bad most the time but still... Well maby ill do a little more research on codeblocks see whats going on with them. Havnt used them for quite some time now.

Thanks guys for the responses :)

Aum

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