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jideo29

Tools needed for RPG Game Development

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Hi! I'm currently having my thesis A and I would like to propose for a game. The problem is I don't know where to start. I have these questions in mind so please take time to answer it. 1.)What are the tools I need to make an RPG using C# as the PL and XNA as the framework? 2.)Can an RPG be developed for 5 months? 3.)What branch of Math do I need to study in order to make a 3D game? 4.)Will I use the same application for making characters, Items, terrains and Maps? Thank YOU GUys...

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1.)What are the tools I need to make an RPG using C# as the PL and XNA as the framework?


Pencil.

Paper.

:-P

The coding aspect is pretty straightforward. Aside from an IDE, you'll need content-creation tools.

Note that 'content creation' is a broad topic, covering almost anything that isn't the code itself.

A major part of producing an RPG is properly planning it.
"If you fail to plan, you plan to fail."

So good planning tools are necessary. Flow-charts, spreadsheets, etc.

Quote:
2.)Can an RPG be developed for 5 months?

That's a tricky question. An experienced programmer can probably CODE an RPG in his head while sleeping off a hangover. But fully PRODUCING an RPG goes way beyond just coding. You're talking about not only the code, but also the content and all the things that must happen to make it a reality.

So, can an RPG be coded in 5 months? Absolutely.
Can an RPG be produced in 5 months? Not unless you have a strong and dedicated team.

Quote:
3.)What branch of Math do I need to study in order to make a 3D game?

Algebra and geometry. Trigonometry. And finally calculus for advanced math (e.g., physics simulation).

Quote:
4.)Will I use the same application for making characters, Items, terrains and Maps?

Not really, although some "suites" offer many of the tools needed in one package.

You'll probably use a modeling program to model the character and item meshes.

Terrains generally have a dedicated tool for height-map manipulation and whatnot.

Textures will almost definitely be designed with Photoshop.

Maps are usually designed with a proprietary map-editor.

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I'll answer to some questions..

2.)Can an RPG be developed for 5 months?

Bad or unfinished = yes
Good and small = yes
AAA = hell no

With right tools, you could make one in 3-4.

3.)What branch of Math do I need to study in order to make a 3D game?
trigonometry, logic, basic algorithms such as summing

4.)Will I use the same application for making characters, Items, terrains and Maps?

I think not, since this needs modeller, such as Blender or Wings3D. Execpt the program has scripter+level editor+modeller, then yes (such as Blender..)

Hope I was for some help

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Thank you for the answers...
The truth is I'm working alone. I'm planning to go for a 3D game but basically before I put it into document I'm just making sure that I can really do the stuff. Thanks... Got some ideas... Hope to have some updates from you guys...

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(I am assuming by "RPG" you mean either a Dragon Quest clone, a Diablo clone or a Oblivion clone).

My one recommendation: don't bite off more than you can chew.

You will not make Final Fantasy XII in 5 months. Most people can't make Final Fantasy (#1) in 5 months. So plan to make something that takes advantage of the fact that you don't have resources. You don't have resources for content, levels, art, music, etc.

So you have to innovate. Consider procedurally generated worlds. Resist the urge to create hundreds of useless pieces of armor and weapons (maybe consider removing them completely and unify strength/defense increases with leveling up). Make sure that everything you add to the game is necessary to make the game work. With a project this small, extraneous items/magic is wasted time.

Also realize that 3D art takes more time than 2D art, and that animations take longer than still models. Try to find an art style that you can churn out content quickly. I have used everything from pure geometry (Rumble Box) to crayon scribbles (Hobo Alley) to NES-like large-pixel art (unreleased, but I would like to finish it sometime because it had alot of style). Roguelikes (Nethack is a good example) uses text-only and are still very entertaining.

Finally, consider re-useable content. For example, if you have three levels of fire spells (which I personally would avoid due to cliche) then you can use the exact same effect for all three by increasing the size/number of particles and using a different image for each particle. Secret of Mana for the SNES did this very well (only level 8 used a different effect, if I remember correctly).

Hopefully this will give you a few things to think about. I've watched many a project fail because the creator was certain that he could do it only to realize that even the smallest design has a buttload of content (that happened to me with Stronghold, my second-year school project, as well as a "small" puzzle game called Lemmons Workbench, unreleased).

Good luck!

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From my experience of just diving in head first and doing my best in my after hours, it would realisticly take at least four years (assuming you've got no friends, wife, or loved ones to drag you way from you system) to get to basic features in and working right for a simple beta game (600 hours). As for 3D, that's got to take a few more years unless you have help (1,000 hours). Again these are estimates from my person experience and actually tracking my coding time only, not tracking my design and planning time.

The time would be shorted by quite a bit (down to about 2.5 years instead of 4 for none 3D) if you are fluid with your language of choice and you've done bits and pieces of your game code before, and you know how to avoid common mistakes.

I hope this helps.

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it would realisticly take at least four years (assuming you've got no friends, wife, or loved ones to drag you way from you system) to get to basic features in and working right for a simple beta game (600 hours).

Depends on what you're trying to make. It could take up to four years if you're trying to compete with AAA titles, but smaller indie games can be done in a much shorter time (which is what I think the OP is talking about).

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I'm thinking of shifting from 3D to 2D. The idea of making same effect with just increasing the particles and strength is a very good idea. The concept of my game is to let the player to forge new weapons and armors. So I think I must also lessen the possibilities to create weapons or rather eliminating this just to shift for 1 weapon and just increasing the stats of the character. What about the enemies? Will it take more time to create many monsters or enemies or just make more quest and missions than battles? I'm really learning a lot from you guys. I know I'm a newbie to game making and I do appreciate your help! Thank You!!!

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