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Neonyo

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Always wanted to create a game, but been to lazy to learn coding so been using game makers and such, but i think it is time to stop being lazy. So I am asking for help, been searching through website, but still does not explain the BASICs of programming to me. So I am curious if anyone has any suggestions on websites, books, ect anything to help me on my Game Design dream :D lol thanks.

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There are different types of programming languages (C/C++, Visual Basic, Python,Java.. )

These are useally the most recommended for game development (although others may
disagree here)

I personally recommend starting with C/C++ as C/C++ are industry standard.
(Although some commercial games are moving toward Java for online development)

Heres a nice starting C/C++ tutorial if you are interested..
C++ tutorial

Generally, programming concepts, design, and structure are learned through
experience (and reading) Have you checked the books section?

If you decide to stick with C/C++, note that you will be working in the command prompt for a little while, before you are able to move onto graphics.

Hope this helps, and good luck!

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Quote:
Original post by Crypter
I personally recommend starting with C/C++ as C/C++ are industry standard.
(Although some commercial games are moving toward Java for online development)


I personnally recommend to NOT starting with neither C nor C++ (not to mention C/C++, which is a fictionous language [smile]).

For the very reason exposed in this thread

* C++ is a very complex language. There are simpler alternatives.
* C++ does not come with much useful libraries. The standard library is restricted to very basic tools.
* C++ is convoluted.
* C++ is frustrating.
* as someone already said, "C allows you to shoot yourself a bullet in the feet. C++ allows to to reuse the bullet". C and C++ are core languages, and in a sense you're doing direct-to-metal programming when using them (C is nothing more but a high level assembly language). It means that you have to manage eveything correctly if you want your software to work. More recent languages are more permissive - for example, C# includes a garbage collector that will automagically close files you are not using anymore or free memory that you don't use. In C++, you have to do this by yourself, meaning that
1) it's a potential source of bugs, and bugs are something a beginner don't want to experience
2) your program is bigger than a program that does the exact same thing using a modern language.

Quote:
Generally, programming concepts, design, and structure are learned through experience (and reading) Have you checked the books section?


The book section should be a mandatory read [smile]

Conclusion: there are good languages out there, and some of them are easier to get than C++. So begin with these instead of trying to fight against the beast. i'm not saying that you won't be able to handle this. I'm saying that if you learn programming using a simpler language, C++ will be easier to learn after that.

Regards,

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Quote:
Original post by Crypter
I personally recommend starting with C/C++ as C/C++ are industry standard.
Like Emmanuel, I disagree with the idea that you should choose your first programming language based on the industry standard. C and C++ are both quite complex languages which can be very difficult to learn, and there's no real reason not to start with a language which is more beginner-friendly and then learn C and/or C++ at a later stage if you have the need; especially for someone who's admittedly had difficulties remaining focussed in the past. All that being said, you can start with C or C++ first if you like.

A few languages I would suggest looking into are Python, Phrogram or Blitz Basic. Other options include C# and Java amongst the many other languages to be found out there.

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Quote:

I personally recommend starting with C/C++ as C/C++ are industry standard.

This was worded incorrectly (it was kind of late), and I excluded valid reasons
of choosing C++.

Kazgoroth and Emmanuel Deloget mention valid points against learning C++ first.
I personally never found C++ to complex (as a first language), yet it is
true that I still learn new things (As Im sure almost all of us do). This
could be the 'complexity' of the language.

Quote:

What about, Dark Basic, would that be a good 1st?

Dark Basic should work well -- I personally never used it, but hear good
things about it.

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Quote:
Original post by Neonyo
What about, Dark Basic, would that be a good 1st?
I've never tried it, but people seem to be able to get some impressive results out of it so I don't see why not.

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