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ajm113

When programming a enigine how is everything binded?

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ajm113    355
Hi, I have a question on game engine programming. Lets say I have a rendering script compiled and ready to run anytime and was programed in GLUT OpenGL and I downloaded a physics library and I compiled it and it works fine and was made in C++. And lets say I made a Map Editor in wxPython and I wanted the rendering system to work with it and how do I get that editor to wright maps for the game to use? Is there a spacial way to?

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Farraj    152
It doesn't matter what you write your tools with and how they work as long as they can save the data files in a format that the game can read.

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oliii    2196
It's just software engineering know-how, how to make various large bits work together. Usually, these libraries have one entry point, an API or interface, it's just a matter of making APIs talk to each other, if possible in a nice clean way.

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Endar    668
Quote:
Original post by ajm113
Hi, I have a question on game engine programming. Lets say I have a rendering script compiled and ready to run anytime and was programed in GLUT OpenGL and I downloaded a physics library and I compiled it and it works fine and was made in C++. And lets say I made a Map Editor in wxPython and I wanted the rendering system to work with it and how do I get that editor to wright maps for the game to use? Is there a spacial way to?


From the map editor to write a specific file format is not hard at all.

For the others: when you compile something it goes from code, into assembly, into machine language. That happens to pretty much everything that is compiled.

If you had a library written in C++ (compiled to machine code), and you wanted to call a function in it from Pascal, all you would have to do is write a function declaration and say that it is a C++ function. Then the Pascal compiler will know at what address to place each argument and in what order, and also how to get the return argument.

That's it. You'd have machine language on both sides, but when going into functions, they might deal with data a little differently. This is called a "Calling Convention" (I believe).

Was that what you wanted to know?

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