Sign in to follow this  
Talus057

Math Help

Recommended Posts

Hey guys. I've been head first into C++ the last couple days and so far its all quite eventful. The math I'm using though is basically just stuff I remember from high school and stuff I teach myself through books online and website guides explaining certain arguments. I just don't feel confident in my math at all. So anyway Ive been learning C++ through the book "The C Programming Language". A lot of the things are different though obviously but that only helps me figure it out through the documentation and I think I grasp it easier because of that. But this book is great and the author is really good at talking about programming and teaching it so I was wondering what kind of pre-college math books are out there that work on math skills for better programming. I have a Concrete Mathematics book but that seems too advanced. I Would like something a little more dumbed down. Thanks for your help. I wanted to out right ask this because I know the math books are all quite different and come in various flavors. I specifically want just a pre-college level one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My GameDev personalised control panel often recommends me books with names like 'Beginning Math and Physics for Game Programmers' (I don't have the heart to tell it about my degree [rolleyes]). Now I've never read any of them, so I couldn't advise you any further, but if the you're willing to judge a book by its cover, you may have found what you're looking for.

Admiral

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Talus057
So anyway Ive been learning C++ through the book "The C Programming Language".


Do you actually mean "The C Programming Language" - as in the version by Kernighan and Ritchie? If so: hold up. You're learning C, not C++ - they are two quite different languages (although superficially, they may appear similar, they should not be treated as the same).

There's nothing inherently wrong (although it is perhaps a somewhat dated language now, even with C99 - this is a point of debate into which I'm not entering) with C, but I suspect you rather want to be learning C++.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would suggest looking at a local thrift/used book store for math books. $0.50 is better then $80.00, and the material will be the same (minus the nifty graphics in modern math books).

If you have already had algebra in high school, I would recommend picking up a pre-calculus book with trig. For example...

link

This would refresh your knowlege of algebra, then get you ready for a calculus sequence. Again, If you are rusty definitly pick up a cheap college algebra book from a used book store. I never took algebra in high school, and picked up a previous version of the above pre-calc book (Used for about $2). After self study of this book I did very well in college calculus courses.


You might try to find some free books online... google works wonders.

Math books...looks a bit advanced.
A big List
Free Math books
link

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cool, that's just what I needed. It's just a hobby for me since I have too much spare time usually. :P

@TheUnbeliever

Oops!? Well it worked well enough and I just looked up the code on the documentation and read through examples. I suppose any learning is better than none.


Thanks. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Crazyfool
Holy, where can you find used math books for so cheap? Higher level math is something so intense that the cheapest I've seen a used book go for was 40 bucks =/


If you need fancy graphics to understand a concept (not implying you do), then a newer text book is for you (assume $40+). However, you can find old math books in used books stores and also thrift stores for a couple of bucks. I have a engineering mathmatics book that essentially covers that same material as a new text book (kinimatics, inverse kinamatics particle systems etc). I purchased this book for a few dollars. I have a calculus book from the late 60's that cost me 50 cents.

The main difference in new text books (when it comes to applied mathmatics) is the use of computers. For instance my Diff Eq. instructure says that using power series to find solutions to D.E.'s is going out of style in favor of numerical methods.

Also look to e-bay. If you don't mind e-bay then you can often find math books for realy cheap.

Keep in mind the math books I am talking about are OLD. On occasion you can find a math book from the 90's for farly cheep ($10).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by smc
Quote:
Original post by Crazyfool
Holy, where can you find used math books for so cheap? Higher level math is something so intense that the cheapest I've seen a used book go for was 40 bucks =/


If you need fancy graphics to understand a concept (not implying you do), then a newer text book is for you (assume $40+). However, you can find old math books in used books stores and also thrift stores for a couple of bucks. I have a engineering mathmatics book that essentially covers that same material as a new text book (kinimatics, inverse kinamatics particle systems etc). I purchased this book for a few dollars. I have a calculus book from the late 60's that cost me 50 cents.

The main difference in new text books (when it comes to applied mathmatics) is the use of computers. For instance my Diff Eq. instructure says that using power series to find solutions to D.E.'s is going out of style in favor of numerical methods.

Also look to e-bay. If you don't mind e-bay then you can often find math books for realy cheap.

Keep in mind the math books I am talking about are OLD. On occasion you can find a math book from the 90's for farly cheep ($10).



Ah! I havent looked for older books - though I think I might from now on. A lot of math teachers dont seem to assign problems from the text as much as high school, so looks like you'll be saving me hundreds :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Talus057
@TheUnbeliever

Oops!? Well it worked well enough and I just looked up the code on the documentation and read through examples. I suppose any learning is better than none.


Don't worry, the basics port over quite easily - they are quite similar in syntax. Most (but not quite all) C code will compile in C++, with only the headers changed (i.e. stdlib.h because cstdlib). I suggest you continue learning C, since you've started - get some experience in with that (I would never recommend switching language halfway through the learning process for a beginner). With some programming experience in a similar language under your belt, C++ shouldn't be too daunting (some knowledge of the - far better - C++ standard library and the object oriented features should get you up and running with the basics of C++ before moving onto things like templates).

However, just to reiterate: I suggest sticking with C for now until you're quite comfortable with it and want to learn something new (it's quite possible to write games in C - as far as I'm aware, even most of the graphics APIs should work alright with it without too much hassle).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by TheUnbeliever
Quote:
Original post by Talus057
@TheUnbeliever

Oops!? Well it worked well enough and I just looked up the code on the documentation and read through examples. I suppose any learning is better than none.


Don't worry, the basics port over quite easily - they are quite similar in syntax. Most (but not quite all) C code will compile in C++, with only the headers changed (i.e. stdlib.h because cstdlib). I suggest you continue learning C, since you've started - get some experience in with that (I would never recommend switching language halfway through the learning process for a beginner). With some programming experience in a similar language under your belt, C++ shouldn't be too daunting (some knowledge of the - far better - C++ standard library and the object oriented features should get you up and running with the basics of C++ before moving onto things like templates).

However, just to reiterate: I suggest sticking with C for now until you're quite comfortable with it and want to learn something new (it's quite possible to write games in C - as far as I'm aware, even most of the graphics APIs should work alright with it without too much hassle).


I see what you mean. Dev-C++ is good to go as far as C and C++ is concerned. I've read of people bragging it to be much better than MS Visual C++. I think learning the language is the easy part once you have the mathematical tools to get your tasks written.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this