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mihaimmm

please help me!!!All The steps to make a game

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Making games is actually very simple. I'll outline the steps:

1. Post a topic asking about how to make an MMORPG
2. Use Visual C++ 2005. On the top left of the interface there's a "Game" wizard. It will ask you what kind of game you want to make.
3. ??? (This step generally involves a trip to Vegas across the desert in a large red vehicle)
4. Profit!

In all seriousness though, you need to be more specific than that. What kind of game? What are your goals?

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Original post by Foobar of Integers
Making games is actually very simple. I'll outline the steps:

1. Post a topic asking about how to make an MMORPG
2. Use Visual C++ 2005. On the top left of the interface there's a "Game" wizard. It will ask you what kind of game you want to make.
3. ??? (This step generally involves a trip to Vegas across the desert in a large red vehicle)
4. Profit!

In all seriousness though, you need to be more specific than that. What kind of game? What are your goals?

Welli want a easy to make game, because it is the first tiime i make games. A little fotball game or something easyer. You can propose some games. For the first time i want to make a cool game to work :D

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What do you want your role to be in making a game? What do you think goes on in making games? I'm guessing that your idea of what game making is is different from the reality. If you want to lead a project then need to convince people you can complete something. In order to do THAT you need to either make an entire game by yourself or join an existing project that needs someone of a specific skill set.

Anyway, this particular forum (For Beginners) is mainly concerned with programming and I only know programming so that's what I'll focus on. There is also artwork, level design, music/sound effects, and character design. As you can see, except for programming those are all artistic in nature. Programming requires a large amount of creativity as well, of course.

Programming in itself is a ridiculously huge topic. To program you need a compiler, which is a program meant to translate human language-like text files into computer instructions. These language-like text files are written in a computer programming language. Just like human languages these programming languages come in a large number of flavors.

Once most beginners learn this they ask "what language do I start with?" and some even look up a few on their own and then ask us "which of these is best for making games?" The answer to both of those is riddled with zealotry, mis-truths, half-truths, and general confusion. There is no silver bullet. The important thing is to learn programming, which is how to think in a certain way to translate your goals into a program. A good programmer will ultimately know several computer programming languages. Once you learn one learning another is incredibly easy. Therefore you should probably choose one that's easy to pick up so you can see results and not get discouraged. Others will suggest languages after me, I'm sure.

And finally, don't be afraid of making mistakes. You will make mistakes. The vast majority of all programming time is spent fixing yours and others mistakes. This is good, you learn a lot about programming when you do something wrong. You will ultimately gain a greater understanding after every fixed problem. Good luck.

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Original post by nobodynews
What do you want your role to be in making a game? What do you think goes on in making games? I'm guessing that your idea of what game making is is different from the reality. If you want to lead a project then need to convince people you can complete something. In order to do THAT you need to either make an entire game by yourself or join an existing project that needs someone of a specific skill set.

Anyway, this particular forum (For Beginners) is mainly concerned with programming and I only know programming so that's what I'll focus on. There is also artwork, level design, music/sound effects, and character design. As you can see, except for programming those are all artistic in nature. Programming requires a large amount of creativity as well, of course.

Programming in itself is a ridiculously huge topic. To program you need a compiler, which is a program meant to translate human language-like text files into computer instructions. These language-like text files are written in a computer programming language. Just like human languages these programming languages come in a large number of flavors.

Once most beginners learn this they ask "what language do I start with?" and some even look up a few on their own and then ask us "which of these is best for making games?" The answer to both of those is riddled with zealotry, mis-truths, half-truths, and general confusion. There is no silver bullet. The important thing is to learn programming, which is how to think in a certain way to translate your goals into a program. A good programmer will ultimately know several computer programming languages. Once you learn one learning another is incredibly easy. Therefore you should probably choose one that's easy to pick up so you can see results and not get discouraged. Others will suggest languages after me, I'm sure.

And finally, don't be afraid of making mistakes. You will make mistakes. The vast majority of all programming time is spent fixing yours and others mistakes. This is good, you learn a lot about programming when you do something wrong. You will ultimately gain a greater understanding after every fixed problem. Good luck.


Thanks for the sugestion!!! You are perfectly right!!! I now a little c++...


Other sugestions???

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Well, basically the most simple steps are the following for making an ORPG (Online Role Playing Game)

-> (optional) Get some friends either online or from real life to help you as a support and in the development of the game.

-> Being a beginner I suggest you get a previous engine. Now that you wish to opt for an easy game, I'd suggest you using a 2d game engine (with which you will make 2d games) I use Elysium Diamond (www.splamm.com/elysium)

-> You will need to acquire a team.

-> Put up a website were you enter information and updates (Generally putting someone able to enter data into the website too to help you keep it up to date would help a lot, but this person must be VERY TRUSTED)

-> Build up a forum for members and staff to discuss.

-> Find a server to host your game for as long as possible

-> Keep working on continuous updates like quests, items (weapons, houses etc.)

And if you are going to charge money, think about it well because you might as well receive no players!

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I changed my mind, I'll list some programs, in no particular order:

Game Maker. This is a program meant specifically to build games. I've never user used it, but I'd imagine you will eventually feel limited by it's capabilities. Or not, I really never used it. I will say that a few years back Gamedev.net had a contest and a game created using this program won.

Blitz Basic. A programming language for making games. Also never used this.

Visual C#. Microsoft's flagship .NET product. This one is particularly interesting with the creation of XNA. Basically, you can make games that will run on the XBox360. Some tutorials are located here, here, here, and a great reference from Microsoft here.

C++. There are a number of programs for using c++. These include Visual C++: Express Edition, Code::Blocks, and DevC++. A few good e-books are here and here.

Visual Basic.NET. Another .NET product, you can get it here.

There's Flash, but I'm not sure where to get free flash makers. Or even if they exist.

For other programming languages there's Python, Java, Ruby, etc. To find them just do a search on google. Something will come up.

Hope this helps.

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Quote:
Original post by nobodynews
I changed my mind, I'll list some programs, in no particular order:

Game Maker. This is a program meant specifically to build games. I've never user used it, but I'd imagine you will eventually feel limited by it's capabilities. Or not, I really never used it. I will say that a few years back Gamedev.net had a contest and a game created using this program won.

Blitz Basic. A programming language for making games. Also never used this.

Visual C#. Microsoft's flagship .NET product. This one is particularly interesting with the creation of XNA. Basically, you can make games that will run on the XBox360. Some tutorials are located here, here, here, and a great reference from Microsoft here.

C++. There are a number of programs for using c++. These include Visual C++: Express Edition, Code::Blocks, and DevC++. A few good e-books are here and here.

Visual Basic.NET. Another .NET product, you can get it here.

There's Flash, but I'm not sure where to get free flash makers. Or even if they exist.

For other programming languages there's Python, Java, Ruby, etc. To find them just do a search on google. Something will come up.

Hope this helps.

Thank's a lot. I hope so... Well this doesnt means that someone else has another idea, Right? Thank's a lot, and i am waiting for other's ideas! THANK'S AGAIN

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The game part doesn't exist until you program it.

So step one learn how to program...
step two; learn more about programming...
step three; now learn graphics programming...
step four; learn AI programing...
step five; learn how to design a major project...
step six; learn what the next 17 steps are...

theTroll

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Original post by TheTroll
The game part doesn't exist until you program it.

So step one learn how to program...
step two; learn more about programming...
step three; now learn graphics programming...
step four; learn AI programing...
step five; learn how to design a major project...
step six; learn what the next 17 steps are...

theTroll

Great...Where do i learn that?

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Quote:
Original post by mihaimmm
Quote:
Original post by TheTroll
The game part doesn't exist until you program it.

So step one learn how to program...
step two; learn more about programming...
step three; now learn graphics programming...
step four; learn AI programing...
step five; learn how to design a major project...
step six; learn what the next 17 steps are...

theTroll

Great...Where do i learn that?


University, or you can self-study.

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Quote:
Original post by Omid Ghavami
Quote:
Original post by mihaimmm
Quote:
Original post by TheTroll
The game part doesn't exist until you program it.

So step one learn how to program...
step two; learn more about programming...
step three; now learn graphics programming...
step four; learn AI programing...
step five; learn how to design a major project...
step six; learn what the next 17 steps are...

theTroll

Great...Where do i learn that?


University, or you can self-study.

It must be a easyer way <<repeat i know a little c++>>

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easier way than someone teaching you it(university) and learning your self (self-study)?
as far as im concerned this is the only ways for learning anything! id suggest getting some begginners C++ (or another language by your choice) books from amazon, and then some game programming books from same page. To aid you on your journey, reamember to use online tutorials and this site for help. Youll be surprised to see how much this site contains.

for your books see the "book" section (dropdown menu from "Resources".

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Most people who talk about how hard it is to make a game are talking about making something that feels like a REAL game ... but simple little fun toy experiment things can be very very easy and help you actually learn to program.

About 2 weeks after I started learning GW BASIC at 11 years old I made a program that slowly filled in the screen with randomly colored, randomly sized, randomly positioned circles. It was fun. Why did I do it ... I had just found the RAND function and wanted to use it, and the week before I had discovered the draw functions (like, circle, point, etc).

A month or so after that I cam across the play sound feature and decided I write a piece of sheet music from band as a basic program. Took about 3 days just to code all the timings to sound correct, but man it was a fun adventure learning to acomplish something with that kind of feedback.

Then over the summer I sat down and designed and built a simple text-based (this was bearly 20 years ago) Dungeons and Dragons character editor, with character save and load features. It was really hard, but after about 4 months part-time I had this really cool program I liked because I actually used it. And during the writing I learned "real" programming ... with real functions using the GOSUB routine (I didn't know it the first 2 months so my code was a spagetti mess of GOTOs).

Learning to program and make games is about having fun and exploring possiblities. Sure, learning to write a game you can sell is a HUGE undertaking that takes years and years of practice. But making SOMETHING doesn't take any more time that you want it to. Its all about seeing what you can do, and striving for more. Instead of having a goal that is completely unreasonable and being constantly disappointed.

There are many good choices to learn, in C++ you can do the NEHE tutorials and play around. Or you can use C# and maybe XNA to try some fun things. Or perhaps just go to text based stuff for a few months to get your programming skills a little better first. Flash games are a great way to get something visible done quickly even if you are only half a programmer.

Whatever you choose, have fun and good Luck.

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I have been a software developer for over 15 years. I know c/c++/c#/java/assembler and a spatering of others. Game programming is still work for me. I have yet to finish my first game. Now I have only been at it for two years now and I am a bit of a profectionist but still it is lot so work. Modern games also most need a team to be done right.

Once you learn a part of the game system you have lots more to learn. The basics of a game; graphics, sound, UI, AI, scripting (if needed), level design, content management, save/load.

Every part of that takes either slightly different or majorly different skills. It is a lot of work.

I have finally found a game that I really want to work on but it will be years most likely before it is done.

theTroll

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Quote:
Original post by TheUnbeliever
Quote:
Original post by mihaimmm
repeat i know a little c++


How much?

Well i know how to make a algoritm<but not in c++ language>. The c ++ language i learn know at school


I am at the c in and c out right know...so i have a lot more to learn....

Some help pls

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Well, I don't agree that in University people teach you. They GUIDE you through the process but like always, if you want to be good at anything you really have to learn by yourself.

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If you can use cin and cout, then start making a text-based game.

Graphics is complicated when you're just starting out.

I suggest you make some kind of "adventure" game or something.
The old 80's kind where you get a text description of where you are, and a list of actions you can take:

eg.

//Locations
#define THE_FOREST_MIDDLE 1
#define THE_FOREST_NORTH 2
#define THE_FOREST_SOUTH 3
#define ON_THE_CLIFF 4
#define DEEP_IN_THE_FOREST 5

#define STARTING_LOCATION THE_FOREST_MIDDLE
....
bool gameOver = false;
int location = STARTING_LOCATION;
while( !gameOver )
{
....
if( location == THE_FOREST_MIDDLE )
{
string strChoice;
int iChoice = 0;
while( iChoice != 1 && iChoice != 2 && iChoice != 3 && iChoice != 4 )//user has not made a choice
{
cout << "You are in a a dense forest, there is a path to the north and south" << endl
<< "What will you do?" << endl
<< "1) Go North along the path" << endl
<< "2) Go South along the path" << endl
<< "3) Go East and look over the cliff" << endl
<< "4) Go West deeper into the forest" << endl;

cin >> strChoice;//get user input into a string
stringstream temp(str);//convert string to a string-stream
temp >> iChoice ;//convert the string-stream to an integer
//NB you could jus use cin >> iChoice instead of the above 3 lines
// but this way it doesnt screw up if they dont actually enter an integer!
}
switch( iChoice )
{
case 1: location == THE_FOREST_NORTH; break;
case 2: location == THE_FOREST_SOUTH; break;
case 3: location == ON_THE_CLIFF; break;
case 4: location == DEEP_IN_THE_FOREST; break;
}
}
else if( location == .....
....
}
....



Start with something really simple.

Everyone makes a lot of mistakes when they are starting out. Programming mistakes, code design mistakes, and game design mistakes. This is how you will learn ;)

If you try and make something big, then you will make big mistakes that stop you from finishing the project. So try and make something that small enough, that even if you do make mistakes, you can still complete it.

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Quote:
Original post by Hodgman
If you can use cin and cout, then start making a text-based game.

Graphics is complicated when you're just starting out.

I suggest you make some kind of "adventure" game or something.
The old 80's kind where you get a text description of where you are, and a list of actions you can take:

eg.

//Locations
#define THE_FOREST_MIDDLE 1
#define THE_FOREST_NORTH 2
#define THE_FOREST_SOUTH 3
#define ON_THE_CLIFF 4
#define DEEP_IN_THE_FOREST 5

#define STARTING_LOCATION THE_FOREST_MIDDLE
....
bool gameOver = false;
int location = STARTING_LOCATION;
while( !gameOver )
{
....
if( location == THE_FOREST_MIDDLE )
{
string strChoice;
int iChoice = 0;
while( iChoice != 1 && iChoice != 2 && iChoice != 3 && iChoice != 4 )//user has not made a choice
{
cout << "You are in a a dense forest, there is a path to the north and south" << endl
<< "What will you do?" << endl
<< "1) Go North along the path" << endl
<< "2) Go South along the path" << endl
<< "3) Go East and look over the cliff" << endl
<< "4) Go West deeper into the forest" << endl;

cin >> strChoice;//get user input into a string
stringstream temp(str);//convert string to a string-stream
temp >> iChoice ;//convert the string-stream to an integer
}
switch( iChoice )
{
case 1: location == THE_FOREST_NORTH; break;
case 2: location == THE_FOREST_SOUTH; break;
case 3: location == ON_THE_CLIFF; break;
case 4: location == DEEP_IN_THE_FOREST; break;
}
}
else if( location == .....
....
}
....



Start with something really simple.

Everyone makes a lot of mistakes when they are starting out. Programming mistakes, code design mistakes, and game design mistakes. This is how you will learn ;)

If you try and make something big, then you will make big mistakes that stop you from finishing the project. So try and make something that small enough, that even if you do make mistakes, you can still complete it.


THANKS, ITS A START :d

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Start with programming, not with games. There's a lot more to it than cin and cout, and much of it you'll need for making a game. Buy yourself a decent C++ book (or another language, I like Python) and work through most of that before even trying to make a game beyond Guess the Number. You wouldn't try to learn to walk and ride the bicycle at the same time, so don't try learn game programming and the basics of programming at the same time.

And most importantly, be prepared for failure and lots of work. It's not easy, but it's highly rewarding. Keep at it long enough, and you will get there, but do not expect it to be a walk in the park or a two hour learn. There's a reason why there are college degrees in this, and it's not so that students get to play games in class.

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game programming is scary i think, i am doing a computer game tech degree and i am working as an IT specialist. I program in delphi and (which is know isnt real programming) but whenever i open visual studio i get a stone in my stomach.

I know how to use alot of features in delphi and i use mssql i consider myself compitant in programming software. But when i look back and my uni work i wonder how i did it and indeed how i am gonig to do it when i get back to uni.

I recently opened vis C++ and started again and everything jsut seems so different. I think my ignorance back then served me well as i couldnt understand jsut how involved game programming is there fore i was less afraid.

But i do look forward to going back and sinking my teeth into it i jsut hope that i cant get the hang of it.

Nx

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