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xProwler

basics

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I think you have at least a couple of options here:
Get DJGPP (its a free compiler with a nice IDE called RHIDE). You can get it from http://www.delorie.com/djgpp/
The 320x200 256 color mode was a graphics mode used when DOS was the in thing along with other tweaked ModeX's.

Or if you want to go along the Win9x road and take advantage of the latest graphics cards and accelerators then try to learn a bit about the various API's out there. DirectX 6.1 gives you a generic framework to interface lowlevel 2D graphics, 3D, input, sound, network, etc. This means you don't have to write code for every piece of hardware under the sun. You can get the SDK from Microsoft's website at www.microsoft.com/directx under developers serction (I think they are making you pay for it now though and saying it covers the cost of a CD as an excuse).

Another good one to learn is OpenGL (an open source graphics library developed by Silicon Graphics Inc.) which is a popular, portable 3D library.

There are more specific APIs for certain graphics cards like 3dfx's Glide aswell.

Most (half decent) games nowdays use a combination of a few popular APIs.

[This message has been edited by BigBird (edited July 16, 1999).]

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Actually, contrary to popular belief (including Microsoft), DirectX can be found on MSDN for download. Even though usually DX is only available for download for a short time after a new version becomes released (a month, I believe). You will have to scour the maze that MSDN (and Microsoft's sites in general) is. http://msdn.microsoft.com

BTW, you can still use your DJGPP tutorial, you just have to do everything API specific. You can find good information of DirectX and the Win32 API on MSDN.

Also, chances are you can find everything I just described on the MSDN Library CD-ROM that may have come with you version of Visual C++ 6 (depending on what edition you have).

I hope that clears everything up.

-Chlorine

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if i remember pricing correctly, the $100 version of VC++6 is the "standard" edition.

good news... VC++6 standard COMES WITH DirectX5.

now all you need is a book on it, and you'll be ready to go.

even if you are an experienced programmer, i would suggest WGPFD by lamothe.
(last october, never having used VC++(or any C++ for that matter) or DirectX before, i was able to get up to speed on both in about a week)

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I read a doc on switching to 13h, 320/200/256, and it was for djgpp, which blows because i have MSVC++6 (or borland C++ builder 3, but i despise borland. if i didnt i wouldnt've spent the extra $100 to get vc++6). If you can help me with basic graphics I would greatly appreciate it.

xProwler

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Doughtnut ph33r me because I'm beautiful.

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okay thanks.. I might get that book then wehn my job gets going. If anyone has any tutorials for someone who knows JUST C++ to learn VC++ stuff (DirectX or GLide or WHATEVER), that would be an awesome deal if I could get some info for it. Thanks for all your help. Antoher question is where can I get a list of ANSI colours? The (Charactor 27)[3[number]mText type of coloring. If you can help me, please let me know.
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