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kasbati

Few Questions

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I am in research for game development for a project. I am sure many of you know the answers i am looking. Here are some questions i need them to be answered. 1. what are some unique game applications? Can you think of a new game application which you haven't heard of? 2. The ESRB have used "T" rating on all MMOGs. It's not necessarily accurate. Why is this? 3. What are the benefits and advantages of developing turn based real-time games? I have few more questions but i will ask those once i get answered of these first.

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did you write these questions or are they your homework? Judging by the questions being very good english and your writing being not so good english I'd guess it was homework.

-me

p.s. i don't care at all if your english is not great; i'm just noting that your post and those questions appear to have different authors.

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Guest Anonymous Poster

Quote:
Original post by kasbati
1. what are some unique game applications?
Can you think of a new game application which you haven't heard of?

Well, Bioshock was a cool one that I hadn't heard of; except now that I saw the trailer I have heard of it, so it doesnt count anymore.
I bet you haven't heard of 'Princess Maker 2'

Quote:
Original post by kasbati
2. The ESRB have used "T" rating on all MMOGs. It's not necessarily accurate.
Why is this?

Judging by the cover art on most of them, its accurate: rated "t" for tits

Quote:
Original post by kasbati
3. What are the benefits and advantages of developing turn based real-time games?

Money and fun is the main reason most people develop games.

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Quote:
Original post by Palidine
did you write these questions or are they your homework? Judging by the questions being very good english and your writing being not so good english I'd guess it was homework.

-me

p.s. i don't care at all if your english is not great; i'm just noting that your post and those questions appear to have different authors.

Basicly they are not my homework. I am studying in a University (Florida). It's not from my homework or assignment. I am asking these questions for my own Knowledge.

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Quote:
Original post by kasbati
1. what are some unique game applications?
Can you think of a new game application which you haven't heard of?


With regards to research, rather than asking random people for their ideas on the internet (most of which will either be lame, or be ideas they prefer not to share with you -- and usually both) I recommend you watch for changes in the market and explore what's happening there. Changes in hardware make new things possible, and that drives technical progress and some design aspects (particularly more physically-based gameplay due to improved processing speeds). More than anything else though, where the most diverse ideas have been coming from recently tend to be due to innovations in input devices. Nintendo's DS and Wii provide radically unconventional modes for human / computer interaction, and these have sure enough inspired some very new and different styles of gameplay.

While on the topic of input devices driving gameplay (or human/computer interaction design at large), check this awesome technology out: http://cs.nyu.edu/~jhan/ftirtouch/

Quote:
Original post by kasbati
2. The ESRB have used "T" rating on all MMOGs. It's not necessarily accurate.
Why is this?


It's not really possible for a game developer to know how to assign such a rating when the experience depends predominantly on however random people on the internet behave. In most games that have both a single-player and a multi-player component, you'll typically see some sort of warning next to the rating -- "may not be applicable to online play" or something to that effect. While the game itself may not offer any overtly mature content, this says nothing about what other players will provide.

In short, in any socially focused game like an MMO, the gameplay experience is dictated by the attitudes and behaviors of the players -- and that you cannot capture on the box with a letter.

Quote:
Original post by kasbati
3. What are the benefits and advantages of developing turn based real-time games?


I'm guessing you mean to contrast turn-based and real-time, since "turn-based real-time" comes off as an oxymoron. Basically, this dictates the gameplay experience and the modes of connectivity generally.

Since it's unreasonable to expect people to stand around waiting arbitrarily long amounts of time for other people to take their turns, turn-based games either have to strike an arrangement between having short time limits or they can alternatively allow people to play ongoing games that they check in on for a few minutes every day or couple of days. This form of communication is very high latency, in the sense that it can be a while between when events take place in the game. Often this will evolve to have each turn be increasingly involved, so that when the player does check in on that rare occasion to take their turn, they can be greeted with a satisfying complexity to the choices to be made. In this sense, the communications made are said to be of fairly high throughput -- where a lot of data is transmitted per turn.

Real-time games are the opposite end of the spectrum, being low latency (if you think of a "real-time" game as being made up of many, many tiny turns that progress at a rapid pace) and low throughput since, for any given moment of time, there's a pretty narrow range of options to choose from (move left? Move right? Attack? Do nothing? Etc).

On the technical side, turn-based games are probably much easier to develop since many aspects of physical simulation, graphics, and communication can be abstracted to a great extent -- yet is more difficult to design and balance properly. For real-time games on the other hand, it's a fairly simple matter to throw together some ideas for a very simple physical simulation for some arcade-style action play (like asteroids, for example)...but then you have some mathematically crunchy problems to contend with, requiring efficient graphical rendering for good framerates, varying degrees of sophistication with physical simulations (including collision detection and response, etc), and having to worry about keeping latency to a minimum for networked multiplayer scenarios.

Besides that though, for the design side...it's really a matter of what kind of audience you want to make games for, and what you would prefer to make.

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1. Not sure what you mean.
2. Why do you say it isn't accurate? BTW, the ratings also say "Game experience may change during online play". That means that the user-generated content (including what people say and do) isn't part of the rating.
3. You need to be more specific. Is it possible for a game to be both real-time and turn-based?

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Quote:
Original post by JohnBolton
Is it possible for a game to be both real-time and turn-based?



As strange as it may sound, actually yes
there are a few very rare examples of this

check out X-Com UFO Defence (widely available as abandonware)
and the spiritual succesor UFO Aftershock

some interesting hybrid turn/realtime systems...

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1. Do you mean applications for games or are using "game applications" just to mean "games"? If the latter, then that's pure opinion dependent on the individual and would be useless data unless you were interested in marketing and wanted to see how people's taste in games has changed over time and wanted to see which genre of games are most likely to be profitable in today's market. If the former, then there are a number of applications for games, or just generally realtime interactive simulations. Military uses flight sims for training, medical researchers use 3D interactive simulations to learn about things like DNA replication and protein synthesis, researchers are using it in obesity studies, then insurance companies use it in dictating coverage plans, games are used in educational settings like schools, and obviously, the primary function of games is to provide entertainment. Seriously, google "uses for games" and I'm sure you're bound to find plenty of people's opinions on this matter.

2. As people say, the game itself is rated T because the game content doesn't have material that is mature, but when you go online, you may (most likely) encounter people expressing mature themes online. That's why game developers put a disclaimer saying "gameplay may change during online play".

3. This is pure opinion that varies from individual to individual and I can't see how this can relate to any interesting research. Games like Fallout: Tactics, Baldur's Gate series, Planescape: Torment, Icewind Dale, etc. have this notion of "turn based realtime" combat where it seems everything is continuous, but the game handles the turn-based functions such as rolls and what not for you behind the scenes. Some people love it, others hate it, and others don't care because they don't play those games. In some instances, turn-based realtime gameplay makes no sense (muliplayer FPS). I take a bit of a cynic's approach and say the only reason they developed many traditionally turn-based games with this type of system is to boost sales by attracting those who would otherwise be turned off by something that was purely turn-based (because it's too slow, boring, or whatever). So I guess that's an advantage for developers and publishers...

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