Sign in to follow this  

Aw man so much info I don't know where to begin.

This topic is 3933 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hey guys, I've been looking around gamedev.net for a while in the forums and the articles, and there seems to be a lot of great info here. But my problem is I don't know where to begin. First off I'm in my second year of a Computer engineering degree. I have a little object-oriented programming skills with Java, but know that eventually I will need to learn C++. But I would like to know is it feasible to make a top quality 3D game with Java, because from what I've been told there is a lot of similarity between C++ and Java. Second even though I'm in college right now, I was still considering taking some game-specific course at Game Institute. My only gripe with that is that they focus alot on DirectX. Which isn't really a problem but if I learn that how do I expand my horizon to things like OpenGL or 3ds Max or even something like the Torque engine. I think its just a thing of me not putting 2 and 2 together to see how these correlate. I mean in general, what suggestions do you have for fella who new to the whole game dev seen? (books to read, class to take in school, websites, etc.) Sorry for being so long-winded, I hope you guys can help. Thanks alot in advance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
First of all, the only 3d game i've ever heard of made in java is Runescape. I've been told by professional java programmers that trying to make anything more than a text game is a nightmare.

Second, C# is MUCH closer to java than C++. They're almost identical infact. C# is, apparently, much easier to learn. Ofcourse C++ is more popular, and apparently more efficient. If your comfortable with Java you'll probably be more comfortable with C# then C++.

Someone else, with more experience, will probably come here and tell you to try both and figure out which one your more comfortable with. Which is probably what you should do.

Don't worry about moving from one library to another, once you have the concepts down pat you'll have no trouble adapting to another library/engine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by theStormWeaver
First of all, the only 3d game i've ever heard of made in java is Runescape. I've been told by professional java programmers that trying to make anything more than a text game is a nightmare.

Second, C# is MUCH closer to java than C++. They're almost identical infact. C# is, apparently, much easier to learn. Ofcourse C++ is more popular, and apparently more efficient. If your comfortable with Java you'll probably be more comfortable with C# then C++.
Java is pure garbage for making anything high performance. If you're shooting to land within a frame rate, pick something more suited to that goal. On the other point, the one comparing c# to c++, you'll find the issue to be highly debated. Many argue that c# is actually as fast as c++ is, in many cases even faster [though I personally am inclined to disagree]. Either way, c# does seem to be easier for people to learn and figure out [again, something I disagree with, but that could be because little 'c's and '+'s flow through my blood]

Either way, it comes down to preference.

In any case, it is overwhelming at first, and you certainly are not alone feeling that way. The key is to stay level headed, understand topics in broad strokes first before understanding them in smaller detail [figure out what a 'physics engine' is or what a 'graphics engine' is, and how it fits into the puzzle, before figuring out how to actually implement one]. Start small and don't throw in the towel. It takes time, and there aren't really any learn-everything-over-night methods for programming or game dev.

At the very least you can rest assured that you've chosen to attempt to adopt a challenging enough hobby that you won't just outgrow it in 6 months.

By the way, the shift from OpenGL to DirectX, or from DirectX to OpenGL is a trivial one if you understand what is going on behind the scenes. It's a piece of cake.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Man, I truly appreciate you guys help and words of encouragement. I will definite stay the course with this and try to learn the most that I can. In fact I just got finished reading about 10 threads on C# and decided to learn this language first since as you guys state it is very similar to java. Then later down the road I'll pick up C++ as I've also read its possible to use C++ in C# code.

But once again, thanks guys. You will definitely see me around here alot more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's true that Java is not meant for making games like Doom3 or Unreal3. But you can make 3D and 2D game with Java. I'd speculate up to PS1 quality (again it's speculation). Other than that, performance won't be as bad as some may say.

Check out Nehe, JOGL, and lwjgl for more information on Java and OpenGL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Drigovas
Java is pure garbage for making anything high performance.

With JIT compiling this is becoming less of an issue, but it's still not quite up to snuff for current-gen games.

I suggest getting started by modding some games to get a feel for how things work overall. You can then continue to making a small game - maybe in a language a little less intimidating than C++ - Python or Visual Basic may be choices that suit you. If you have some experience with Java, I recommend keeping with that. I believe it's important to learn C++ eventually though, if you're aiming to make sophisticated 3D games.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic is 3933 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this