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C++ IDE which supports 64 bits too?

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Greetings! Is there any IDE for Windows out there, that supports microsoft C++ copmpilers as well as any others like perhaps INTEL or GCC ? One that is not in permanent beta stage, which supports debug and 64 bit? Of course, there is Visual Studio 2005 but it forces you to install SQL server which makes my machine with a Core 2 DUO with 2,5GHZ and 2GB 1000MHZ RAM with RAID 0 disks run slow. Even I do not want to use C# and SQL the studio forces me to install them - I DO NOT WANT THAT. I would just like a plain C++ enviorment (IDE) with better solutions like if you have that complier, settings are different, and you have to copy solutions here and there, convert project. A 64bit projects also needs to be copied from a 32 bit and you have to be sure that everything is correct if DEBUG and RELEASE. That is too much of crap for a year 2007 IDE. It should be simple. If you change the compiler you shouldn't change the solution. If you change from debug to release it shouldn't be a sepperate project with thousands of parameters I really don't care about them. I shall only see that parameters I am interested in and not the whole crap I'm seeing over and over again. Feel free to post, thank you in advance!

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Guest Anonymous Poster
The Visual Studio 2005 doesn't force you to install anything! You can choose what you want to install in the setup. I also doubt that the SQL server makes your computer run slow. But again, you don't have to install the server!

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Small thought, even if it did force you to install it, disable the sqlserver service??

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Why should I mess arround with that? And for notice: YOU CAN NOT DESELECT SQL. Components will be installed at any cost.

The other thing in Visual Studio is, once you have a project running in debug and 32 bit, to working release, x64 debug and x64 release can take hours to get it working if not even days. This process it too long and should be completly automated. I do not believe they will manage that soon.

And for notice, Visual Studio can not couple with makefiles directly, you have to use solutions. The other thing is Visual Studio is new every 2 years, and projects have to be converted even if I do not want to. Other developers in the source repository might not have the latest visual studio or do not want to use it but stil they can not work on one solution. Either it is converted or some other force is required.

Why couldn't there be c++,.h and a makefile for everyone and that's about it? Why can't someone that uses ISO standard C++ in 2005 not work together with someone that has Visual Studio 2002 or 2003? They need several solutions to manage the same source files.

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Quote:
Original post by Samurai Jack
Why should I mess arround with that? And for notice: YOU CAN NOT DESELECT SQL. Components will be installed at any cost.

The other thing in Visual Studio is, once you have a project running in debug and 32 bit, to working release, x64 debug and x64 release can take hours to get it working if not even days. This process it too long and should be completly automated. I do not believe they will manage that soon.
What version of visual studio? The express edition doesn't do x64 as far as I know, but the professional edition does. And the professional edition doesn't require you to install SQL server. I know, because I have it running without SQL server on my home computer.

The only reason a project should take ages to get running in x64 if it runs in x86 is if it wasn't written properly to begin with and relies on things like the size of a pointer being the same as the size of an int, and other things. My current project was running as x86, and making a x64 configuration took 5 minutes, if that. It's also a good idea to develop the x86 and x64 versions in parallel, so you can catch any bugs before they become a problem.

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I didn't say it installs SQL SERVER 2005 but several components. Or at even some light version of it. One might then go in add or remove programs and removes it completly. I ment the Professional edition.

The other thing is, it is impossible to join one subversion repository with pure ANSI C ISO standard c++,.h and of course makefiles with various IDEs. There can not be a team member having VS 2002 where others have VS 2005 even the code is pure ansi C.

I hoped, there could be an universal solution for everyone. At time of writing I just can't recall one.

But it is true SQL SERVER will not be installed but several components will be. Everyone who has time can check uppon that. After installing visual studio with minimum requirements (custom) take a sneek peak in add/remove programs. There will not only be just SQL components (NOT the SERVER) but also portable devices bla bla which I did not request at the moment.

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Quote:
Original post by Samurai Jack
And for notice, Visual Studio can not couple with makefiles directly, you have to use solutions.

File -> New Project -> Visual C++ -> General -> Makefile Project.

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Quote:
Original post by Samurai Jack
I didn't say it installs SQL SERVER 2005...


Quote:
...but it forces you to install SQL server





Quote:
The other thing is, it is impossible to join one subversion repository with pure ANSI C ISO standard c++,.h and of course makefiles with various IDEs. There can not be a team member having VS 2002 where others have VS 2005 even the code is pure ansi C.


OpenTTD hosts seperate solutions for these two IDEs alongside makefiles, all available from their SVN repository. They have a script which auto-generates the XML solution files from sources.list (which I presume their makefiles use as well). Not hard to implement.

Also, in the dialog launched from File -> New -> Project from existing code, you have the option to use only an external build system, which can be used to kick off your makefiles.

Interesting definition of "impossible".




Quote:
If you change from debug to release it shouldn't be a sepperate project with thousands of parameters I really don't care about them.


See the configuration manager. It is not a seperate project. This mechanism is also used to host 64 bit code side by side. You can set whatever parameters you're interested in all at the same time (select "All Configurations" before editing, duh). If you select the correct project type when creating your project, the defaults are sane.




Quote:
...which makes my machine with ...specs... run slow


I noticed no extra slowdown after installing VS2005 Express or Standard on my own box, and it slightly underspecs yours.

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@MattNewPort: I have investigated your idea too but it still produces a .SLN instead of a makefile. So you still have solutions and projects instead of one single makefile. Thank you anyway it is an interesting idea!

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