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MadsGustaf

would you recomend me to get this book?

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So. I have previusly read "Accelerated c++", and am soon finishing "beginning c++ game programming" (michael dawson). In order to begin on my "Beginning game programming"(michael morrison, a SAMS book) i need to have (some) Win API knowledge. Would i be best suited reading Ivor Horton's "Beginning Visual C++ 2005", hence it teaches how to use c++, .net, windows api and GUI. Would i be better suited reading "game programming all in one 2nd edition."? or can i possibly gain the required knowledge from online tutorials? Anyhow, i appriciate all response! -Mads

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If you already read Accelerated c++ and understood it you don't even have to bother with beginning c++ game programming since you are already 10x more advanced ed than anything the 2nd book can teach you!
I suggest the Horton book then since it's encyclopedic as his books always are and he covers everything about VS2005 and C++. He even covers stuff like C++/Winform integration,MFC,and other stuff that I haven't seen covered anywhere else.

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im aware that accelerated c++ is way more advanced, but i really like how, i can now program "small" games, im using what ive learned in accelerated c++ to make the games in michael dawson's book even more effective, so i dont think im wasting time :) i will 100% suggest this book combo to beginnings.
My biggest problem is, i dont know how much i should read about the c++ language, and how much i will actiully need, when programming games. So, if we say i read Ivor Horton's book, and understand it, will i then be well suited, and having no need to read more "c++, non game related books"?
-Mads

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I would not really recommend "Beginning Visual C++ 2005" if you are looking to develop games. A lot of the basic stuff in there you already know. A lot of the stuff on VS 2005, C++/CLI, MFC, and GUI applications won't really be that useful for games.

They could come in handy for making level editors and other tools, but your first few games probably won't require things like that.

If you need to know some basic Win32 for "Beginning Game Programming", you could try out some tutorials at FunctionX or Winprog. Both are fairly straightforward.

Honestly though, I'd not recommend using Win32 for games. It is fairly complicated for what it gives you. A much simpler library that does roughly the same thing is SDL, which is pretty popular for games. You definitely know enough to start making simple SDL games. If you do decide to give that a shot, check out Lazy Foo's tutorials.

Happy coding!

PS: I have been studying C++ for four years, including taking several University classes that teach it, and have read probably 5 non-game books on C++. I still have a lot to learn and have a list of C++ books I want to read when I get the chance. C++ is crazy complicated - there's always more to learn [smile].

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Ok I get what you are saying now.
You want to get started writing games now using your C++ knowledge?
I thought you just wanted to know which of the books you mentioned contained more value. Personally I own/have read all of them and the Dawson book I agree is a very good book for beginner's but all the game are text based and it doesn't show you one example of how to draw anything to the screen which is what most games now do.
I read the Morrison book too when I was a newbie and didn't know any better and if you are a masochist go ahead and read it and it does cover all the basic win api knowledge you need so no need for an additional book.
If you want to start making games in the next couple of days follow the link covering SDL since it's way easier that way but even that is way too much work compared to python/pygame now my personal favorite.

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I'd like to use c++ for my games :) thanks anyway! looks like you did quite a good job on the tutorial!
I'd realy more like to use OpenGL, but i figured it would be a bit to advanced to jump into, right after writting my first tic-tac-toe game. So i think ill be better suited, if i first get atleast some win32 knowledge so i can read the morrison book. I however am not sure how the best way to approach the problem (which was my reason i made this topic).

[Edited by - MadsGustaf on April 21, 2007 5:47:53 PM]

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if you are looking for a book to read, i highly recomend 3D Game Engine Programing by Stefan Zerbst and Oliver Duvel.

altho the book used directx 9 you can easly move that knowledge over to opengl. The book covers everything from making a level editor to programing an entire 3d game engine to writing an actual 2 person FPS in the end.

its one of the best books i've ever read, as long as you understand c/c++ you dont have to ever done anything with directx to pick up on what he is doing. it also gives you the insite on how to make a game from the ground up.

http://www.amazon.com/3D-Game-Engine-Programming-Development/dp/1592003516

p.s. its not a small book @ almost 900 pages.

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Hi,
I've read Michael Morrison's (very good btw) book, and when I started I knew absolutely nothing about the Win API. Although the first few chapters were quite difficult to get through, I eventually got on top of it. So really, I think the short introduction to the Win API that comes "Beginning Game Programming" is sufficient, as even though it's only a very basic guide, you will gradually pick up new information throughout the book.

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