Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
Baiame

Tiled premade mesh based terrain

This topic is 4256 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hello. I'm considering using a grid of pre-made mesh tiles (such as ground, cliff_straight, cliff_corner, etc; just like tile-based 2D games but 3D) for large environments. The only similar example I can think of is Deep Shadows' Boiling Point. I'm looking to have an environment that is at least 64 km^2, and tiles that are either 65^65 or 129^129 vertices (2 m/vertex) on each side at the lowest LOD level, and with a decent draw distance (at least 2 km). I predict that a tile-based solution has advantages of easy texturing, easier pathfinding implementation, easier editing (I doubt I could make an interesting 64 km^2 standard terrain), and better support for very steep features (e.g. cliffs, plateus, buttes). Any input would be nice. Do you know of any other examples? Have you tried this yourself? What problems am I likely to face? Thanks for any help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
The only terrain I've ever made is based on heightmap (which can get ugly in some cases). This tile-method seems like it would be a good idea, but I'm not quite sure how it would all fit together. If the terrain were all made up of premade meshes, it would seem hard to fit them all together without seams. Maybe you could explain a bit more on how this work work.

Maybe a combination of heightmap and tiles would work well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by GumgoThis tile-method seems like it would be a good idea, but I'm not quite sure how it would all fit together. If the terrain were all made up of premade meshes, it would seem hard to fit them all together without seams. Maybe you could explain a bit more on how this work work.

Well, they're all generic and reusable pieces, so you'd have to make the edges match up on all meshes (or at least such equality between the edges of meshes that must be tiled with each other). As for seams and LOD, it'd be the same as normal; just shifting most of a row of vertices such that you eliminate half the faces on a side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Baiame
Do you know of any other examples?
Neverwinter nights did it this way, along with MANY others. Matter of a fact, this is pretty much 'THE' way to do 3d terrain in most RTS games.
Quote:
Original post by Baiame
Have you tried this yourself?
Yes, works great. Especially if you're not backed by an army of artists to make everything fresh from scratch. You can generate a lot of terrain, very quickly, with minimal effort and time.
Quote:
Original post by Baiame
What problems am I likely to face?
That really depends on your design, but a major problem that this method tends to face is how you approach stitching the pieces together, especially with changes in height and little lumps and bumps in the terrain. You don't want it to *look* tiled, so you don't want to have restrictions on where you can place things [thus likely resulting in overlaps], but at the same time you don't want things to be poking through eachother.

Either way, it's a good method, and this approach has been taken by a lot of very good projects. Good luck to you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by DrigovasNeverwinter nights did it this way, along with MANY others. Matter of a fact, this is pretty much 'THE' way to do 3d terrain in most RTS games.

Ah, didn't think of that (or Dungeon Siege). But most RTS games I've played use heightmaps and I don't get into RPGs, hence my lack of knowledge on examples.
Quote:
Original post by DrigovasYes, works great. Especially if you're not backed by an army of artists to make everything fresh from scratch. You can generate a lot of terrain, very quickly, with minimal effort and time.

Good to hear it's a nice method. I wonder if anyone's tried this for an FPS (apart from Deep Shadows).
Quote:
Original post by DrigovasThat really depends on your design, but a major problem that this method tends to face is how you approach stitching the pieces together, especially with changes in height and little lumps and bumps in the terrain. You don't want it to *look* tiled, so you don't want to have restrictions on where you can place things [thus likely resulting in overlaps], but at the same time you don't want things to be poking through eachother.

How about just using common edge geometry for all meshes that can be tiled (as I suggested in my previous post)? Oh, and placement limitations aren't a big problem, considering my purposes.
Quote:
Original post by DrigovasEither way, it's a good method, and this approach has been taken by a lot of very good projects. Good luck to you.

Cheers.

Thanks for your input so far everyone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!