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ShawMishrak

PhysX - Running Without System Software Install?

8 posts in this topic

Is it possible to run PhysX programs without installing the system software on the computer? I tried just copying the PhysX DLLs to the same path as the executable, but NxCreatePhysicsSDK just returns 0. I ask because I would like to implement PhysX into my current project, but some of the time I spend coding is at school where my account does not have permissions to install software. I have no problem personally with installing the system software, it's just that I cannot do that at school.
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How the hell (excuse my French) did you get an Ageia PhysX card into a SCHOOL computer? (By the way, I'm at school too, lol) Or *DID* you install the card? (You know that you have to do that first, don't you?)

Anyway, the PhysX program and DLLs actively tells the processor to shift all physics-related functions (it uses the "compatible function" list of the Havok Engine) to the port of the PhysX card, instead of the core processor(s)/graphics processor(s). The PhysX program, without the card, is referencing a port which doesn't exist, or at least scanning for a port which doesn't exist. So it is effectively useless. I hate to be rude, because I'm relying on my school computer to develop as well, but do you even have a home computer? (If you don't, you're in the same boat as me.) You should be developing on that if possible.
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Several PhysX enabled games installed the drivers on my computer and I don't have the card. Without the card it does physics in software. You don't need the card to install the 'drivers'.
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Quote:
Original post by ShawMishrak
Is it possible to run PhysX programs without installing the system software on the computer?


As far as I know you'd have to install the "AGEIA PhysX System Software" it should install the runtime and all you need to run it. The installer probably creates registry keys, registers some DLLs and probably add paths (I don't have the runtime/SDK installed to verify this...). If you just want to run the application (and not compile) you might try to edit the registry and paths yourself... but that is probably blocked since you don't have the permission to install.

Otherwise, try asking the techs at your school... some understands those problems and will gladly help you.

JFF
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Quote:
Original post by ShotgunNinja
How the hell (excuse my French) did you get an Ageia PhysX card into a SCHOOL computer? (By the way, I'm at school too, lol) Or *DID* you install the card? (You know that you have to do that first, don't you?)

Anyway, the PhysX program and DLLs actively tells the processor to shift all physics-related functions (it uses the "compatible function" list of the Havok Engine) to the port of the PhysX card, instead of the core processor(s)/graphics processor(s). The PhysX program, without the card, is referencing a port which doesn't exist, or at least scanning for a port which doesn't exist. So it is effectively useless. I hate to be rude, because I'm relying on my school computer to develop as well, but do you even have a home computer? (If you don't, you're in the same boat as me.) You should be developing on that if possible.


No, this has nothing to do with installing the PhysX hardware processor. I want it to just run in software mode, as a physics engine like Newton or ODE, which it is perfectly capable of doing. I have a home computer and I do most of my development on it, but it would be nice to be able to do stuff at school as well. It gives me something to do in my sometimes 2+ hours between classes. If I cannot get it to work, no big deal.


Compiling is not a problem, I can do that easily by copying the .lib/.h files. It's just getting the PhysXLoader to find the actual PhysX binary that is the problem. I was hoping that just having the PhysXCore.dll file in the same folder as the executable and PhysXLoader.dll files would do the trick, but I guess not...


Thanks for the help!
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The installer also creates a folder in System32 called AGEIA and puts two bin files in there (app.bin and diag.bin). Not sure if these are required when running, but you could try copying this folder into the same folder as your executable.

Another thing to try would be the dependency walker on your home machine and try to replicate what it uses on the other machine.

I am going to back up the suggestion to ask the technical staff at your school though [smile]
Quote:
Original post by ShotgunNinja
How the hell (excuse my French) did you get an Ageia PhysX card into a SCHOOL computer? (By the way, I'm at school too, lol) Or *DID* you install the card? (You know that you have to do that first, don't you?)

Anyway, the PhysX program and DLLs actively tells the processor to shift all physics-related functions (it uses the "compatible function" list of the Havok Engine) to the port of the PhysX card, instead of the core processor(s)/graphics processor(s). The PhysX program, without the card, is referencing a port which doesn't exist, or at least scanning for a port which doesn't exist. So it is effectively useless. I hate to be rude, because I'm relying on my school computer to develop as well, but do you even have a home computer? (If you don't, you're in the same boat as me.) You should be developing on that if possible.
Have you ever even used PhysX? [lol]

Good Luck,
ViLiO
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I have the same issue as you, i too like to code in school between classes! ...still have my 'portable' project with 2.3.2 version of the sdk (that's prior to the darn system software) for messing around ..i also liked to send my demos to friends etc, but now i'd have to bother them with downloading, installing, rebooting...

So if you get any further please post! i'll do likewise..
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I believe its possible, I read on another forum that there is a post on the AGEIA forum which explains how to do it. However I never found the post myself (although i didn't look that hard).
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Shotgunninja,

You don't need a PhysX card, it runs in software mode or hardware mode, I use the PhysX SDK and don't have a card, although it would be worth having :)

personally it's easier just to use the installer LOL as it puts the files in the relevant places, but according to the install you need 3 files in system32 (PhysX, PhysX manifest,PhysXLoader) then the rest of the DLL's like PhysXCore and PhysXCooking stored on the AGEIA Technologies folder within their relevant version folder, not sure about any registry entries - have alook lol, I haven't tried this but I would seem like a logical solution without the installer, just see what file goes where.

why don't you just ask at school whether they can install PhysX for you? that would be easiest solution lol
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