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C#, C++.net or C++ for game developmnet

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Hello! Should I learn C# or C++.NET or C++???? Because I am confused, people say that C++ is very powerfull and most game dev. use it but some on the other hand they say that C# is better because you write much smaller code and its safer (garbage collection etc.), and what's with C++.NET what are his advantages and can i write DX10 games with it or only DX9.0c? THX to anyone who answers my questions...

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It really depends on what type of programming you want to do, and how new you are to programming in general.

C++ is very powerful and most game devs do still use it, but I think that C# is great for beginners as you don't have to worry about the complicated stuff C++ as it handles that for you, it's a good learning platform from which to develop.

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Learn them all.

Seriously.

You don't have to get to professional level in all of them, but you will be the better software developer if you at least have some insight into the different approaches and paradigms out there. Then again, C++/C# aren't amazingly different (please - hold your fire!) given other languages such as the functional ones (Haskell for example)...

If you want fast results then C# is probably a good enough choice. You don't have access to D3D10 through this route though (but the community might be picking up the tab here). For games, C# and XNA-GSE is a pretty good route to quick results but it'll be possible to hit its limits and you may then have to consider 'native' development and that'll probably be in C++.

hth
Jack

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Quote:
Original post by Myrtle
C++ is very powerful and most game devs do still use it, but I think that C# is great for beginners as you don't have to worry about the complicated stuff C++ as it handles that for you, it's a good learning platform from which to develop.
Don't confuse a good learning platform with something that can't be used seriously or professionally, though. [wink]

Bear in mind that hitting limits is not a problem with the language in this case, but a problem of API support.

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Quote:
Original post by benryves
Quote:
Original post by Myrtle
C++ is very powerful and most game devs do still use it, but I think that C# is great for beginners as you don't have to worry about the complicated stuff C++ as it handles that for you, it's a good learning platform from which to develop.
Don't confuse a good learning platform with something that can't be used seriously or professionally, though. [wink]

Bear in mind that hitting limits is not a problem with the language in this case, but a problem of API support.


Yup. What he said. ;)
If you're just learning, I'd start out with C#. Like JollyJeffers said, it's quick and easy to get something going, which makes it excellent for a learning tool. Once you have some experience with it, you can make the move to C++, or you could stick with C# and use either Managed DirectX or XNA Game Studio Express.

Best of luck!

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If you want to write games as a hobby, to entertain yourself and your friends, learn C#. It's easier to learn, there's less messing around with tedious low-level stuff and will probably do everything you'll ever need.

If you want to get a job writing games, learn C++ (and later C#). It's harder to learn but more often used in professional game development (though C# is more often used for tools) and will definitely do everything you'll ever need.

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Excellent advice in previous posts so far!

If you're serious about learning the ins and outs of the language then I'd definitely choose C++. It's a lot more mature than the Microsoft variants meaning that the quality of reading material out there is much better.

Having said that they are all very similar and if you're really learning how to program as opposed to learning how to program against an API then there isn't really that much difference and you should find it quite easy to switch between them once you get passed the groundwork stage.

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