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Lode

The Invisible Laser Mouse

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Lode    1003
My KeySonic Laser Mouse came with a warning to not look into the laser because it can harm the eyes. However sometimes it just happens for one reason or another that I pick up the mouse and see the bottom of it. But I see nothing, there's no red light or anything. Is the laser invisible? Is it emitting when the mouse is picked up? That would mean that it's an invisible signal that hurts the eyes, which is somewhat scary...

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Dranith    504
My brother has a Logitech laser mouse, and it shuts off pretty quickly after you pick it up. This means you would basically have to press it onto your eye to get it to turn on / possibly burn anything. That is actually kind amusing to think about (pressing a mouse up against your eye to burn yourself with a laser).

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knowyourrole    254
I think Dranith is right. My Logitech G5 also has such a warning, and it's pretty damn hard to see the actual laser, but it is there. I imagine the fact that it stops working after about a cm or so off the mouse mat means that it shuts off automatically. I can see a really faint red light if I hold the mouse a tiny distance off my hand, but that's about it, maybe it's just weak as hell.

I think it might actually shoot out at an angle [cautiously raises mouse to eye]

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adam_o    137
Umm, mice are supposed to shoot their lasers out at an angle, or else they couldn't detect movement. My mouse doesn't turn off when I pick it up, but the laser hurts, even when you see it out of the corner of your eye... speaking of lasers, why do mice use them? Does it really need the high-powered light to detect something as obvious as movement? Or do I not understand this correctly?

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tstrimp    1798
Quote:
Original post by adam_ospeaking of lasers, why do mice use them? Does it really need the high-powered light to detect something as obvious as movement? Or do I not understand this correctly?


They are for higher resolution then a standard optical mouse. Whether they actually make a difference or if it's just hype I'm not sure. I am perfectly happy with my Logitech MX518 optical.

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Chad Smith    1344
I have a Logitech laser mouse, and mine dosen't even show a laser period. Which one do you have? I have a MX610 Laser Cordless mouse.

Chad.



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Lode    1003
Quote:
Original post by tstrimp
Quote:
Original post by adam_ospeaking of lasers, why do mice use them? Does it really need the high-powered light to detect something as obvious as movement? Or do I not understand this correctly?


They are for higher resolution then a standard optical mouse. Whether they actually make a difference or if it's just hype I'm not sure. I am perfectly happy with my Logitech MX518 optical.


It does seem to make a difference. A regular optical mouse (with a red led) is clearly less precise. Even if it has "high precision", if you move the mouse VERY fast (faster than you would in any normal situation), the cursor sometimes jumps up or down in another direction.

With the laser mouse I have been trying to move the mouse the fastest I possibly could, and the cursor has always correctly followed these movements.

However, these differences are only in situations where you move the mouse faster than in normal usage situations. It could matter for gaming.

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WillC    548
The laser in a laser mouse is invisible because it operates at an infrared wavelength of around 850nm. Visible light lies between about 400mn and 700mn (although this varies from person to person).

High power infrared lasers are dangerous because you can't see them, so you don't know they are damaging your eyes until it's too late. Even though you can't see the light, the intense concentration of energy can still damage the sensitive cells in your eye.

The laser in a mouse though is pretty low power (certainly less than 1mW), and the mouse will have safety systems built in to turn off the laser when you lift it up. You could still do something stupid like put it right up to your eye, so the mouse detects the surface of your eye as a valid surface, and turns on the laser. Don't do this, unless you are trying to make yourself blind.

From what I've read, the laser works better than an LED because it emits a very pure single wavelength of light that is much more accurate to track on a various different surfaces; especially shiny ones.

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Lode    1003
This mouse has quite a high DPI and no switch to change it. In both KDE in Linux, and in MS Windows, the very lowest accelaration/speed setting of the mouse cursor is required to have it operate at a sane speed. I'm wondering what would happen if mice have an even higher DPI later? Is OS support required to have sane speeds then?

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Sharlin    864
Quote:
Original post by LodeThat would mean that it's an invisible signal that hurts the eyes, which is somewhat scary...


Almost *all* electromagnetic radiation is invisible; a large portion of it also hurts *anything* made of cells, not just the eyes.

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frob    44975
Some of these posts are scaring me.

Just because you can't see it doesn't mean it's not there.

Imagine a lasik laser. It's ultraviolet so you can't see it, but I imagine that pointing the thing at your eye could do significant damage. [grin]

Next I suppose we'll get comments that we should have little lights to warn us when there is high UV exposure, since you can get sunburn on an overcast day when the UV is still getting through.

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neo_7    126
A week ago, i purchased the MS Notebook Laser mouse 6000.
It realy looks a great mouse. I have only two serious issues to share.

1) First of all, I'm using a Notebook (sony vaio) and made the mistake to install
the included CD whith MS Intellimouse, so that i can have access to the special
Button that my new mouse features.
Well, the thing is that after the installation of Intellimouse the whole original menu and settings of my vaio's touch-pad (under control panel->mouse)
was completely gone and replaced with Microsoft's menu and settings!
My touch-pad had many special features and settings there, that i've now lost forever!
I tried uninstalling Intellimouse and then the menu "mouse" turned to the basic menu of Win XP.

2) About the Laser mouse invisible radiation, i've made a simple test. With my mobile phone's camera, i captured a video so that i can see the mouse's laser beam. I picked it up slightly (about 2-3 cm) a few cm from my mouse-pad having the camera facing to the mouse-pad and a blue beam appeared on the mobile's screen.
After picking it up from the mouse-pad (about 2-3 cm), the beam was shining continuously for about 3 seconds and after that point it started to flash periodically. Then i lift it up some more (about 15 cm and holded it there) and again having the camera facing down at the mouse-pad. The flashing beam was still there on the mouse-pad!! Which means that the mouse does not stops flashing the laser beam. After that i gave it some more lift! (about 30 cm now) and again i could capture the flashing laser beam on the mouse-pad!!
So i'd sugest you to be very careful with the mouse laser beam as it does not stops working even if you leave it upsidedown facing the sky forever!
I cannot tell if the same happens with mice of other brands, but with ms' mice it works as i described.

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V-man    813
That's kind of stupid. Why are they using an infrared laser? If it was visible, at least you can tell if it is on or not.

It's not like a red laser is so much more expensive.

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