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geekalert

741 opamp

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geekalert    193
Hi I know this is a newbish question, but since I'm just starting electronics and stuff, here it goes: Are opamps packaged in DIP's static sensitive? I know most IC's are static sensitive, but at the same time I'm not sure... and should I use 15 or 30 watts when soldering the 741 opamp? thanks in advance! edit: I have the LM741C from National Semiconductor, incase that matters.

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TheAdmiral    1122
Just about every IC manufacturer makes 741s, so there may be exceptions to my claims, but as far as I know the LM741C is almost universal standard.

The circuitry in the 741 is very simple and the chips tend to be fairly big. They're also a very common component for beginners' projects. As a result, the chip is pretty robust - I'd be very surprised if you could damage it inadvertently with a static discharge. Nevertheless, it's a good idea to get into the habit of being grounded around all electronic jobs.

And yeah, even 30 Watts is pretty conservative for this kind of job if you know how to swing an iron. Save the 15 Watt setting for more delicate jobs.

By the way, isn't this a little off topic?

Admiral

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prh99    520
I am not sure this is really a forum for electronics, but I believe a good jolt of static will damage most ICs (especially CMOS), so I would advise some care when handling. I am not sure of how sensitive the 741 specifically is.
Personally I use chip sockets and insert the chip after soldering. I would think 15 watts enough, but doubt 30 will hurt it unless you hold it on a lead for awhile.

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kal_jez    303
Sockets can be useful if u are experimenting or developing stuff as it's easy to replace the chip if you blow it up, ie power supply problem or overload an input, also you can check the voltages and signale levels in the socket before you plug the chip in. That being said the 741 types tend to be pretty robust.

As for the soldering iron you can actually do more damage with a lower powered iron as you have to leave it on the joint longer to get it up to temperature and give the ofending temperature more time to spread to the inside of the chip. If u find yourself doing a fair bit of this sort of thing i would lash out on a good temperature reglated soldering station with a nice fine pencil iron, you will appreciate the difference.

I've never found static to be a huge issue with most modern simple chips, CMOS types can be a little sensative, as a general rule if they come on antistatic foam or foil then be a little careful (ie no nylon underpants [caution]).

As a matter of curiosity what are you making?

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Zahlman    1682
This is a programming forum; electrical engineering questions usually go to the Lounge. :/

Chip sockets are an excellent idea for IC circuits, the same way that fuses or circuit breakers are an excellent idea for any heavy-load circuits. (And if you have to interface the two, make damn sure you know what you're doing!) By the end of my design project term in university, I was soldering chip sockets and wires in place on my circuit boards with an old radio/tv soldering iron with no voltage control (i.e. plugged straight in to 120V, and a pretty big thing at that - don't know what the current draw was, though). I would recommend that you not do that if you don't have to, but a 30W setting should be fine for almost anything.

And yes, get in the habit of discharging static safely, every time. Also, store components in the proper anti-static bags or in other safe ways (pushed into a breadboard should be fine). Also, make sure you know which pin is which :) Organize your board properly, so that chips bridge over rails in the way that's expected for your board design, and align all the chips the same way, so that you can use the VCC/GND "rails" properly.

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