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C and C++

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Hi, I have reached a stage in my C++ programing where I can write simple applications and anything I dont know in the language I can pick up with relative ease. I still see alot of C content on the internet in my travels. Is it worth learning C and exactly how hard would it be to learn C if I already have an adequite knowledge of C++. Thanks, Genesiiis!

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The only real reasons to use C these days are (a) legacy code, and (b) legacy (or otherwise limited) platforms. In either case, you'll know it when you come to it. It's not difficult at all to pick up the C language; it's relatively simple to pick up the C standard library; C idioms will throw you for a loop the first time but aren't really a big deal.

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Believe it or not, rather hard. But only if you really want to dig in and be aware of all the nagging little differences.

The problem is that some of the really tricky differences between C and C++ are either very subtle, or very new (or a combination of both). Most of the reference information you will find on the internet will be at best inaccurate and at worse complete wrong about what is C and what is C++ (at least when you're talking about places that show you code that purports to be one or the other).

You probably know enough of the superficial C syntax from knowing C++ that you could more-or-less correctly read a C program, and maybe even write one if you fumbled about with a couple error messages (which would arise most likely from the use of unavailable keywords or some such). It would be easy to pick up the major differences between the languages and be able to be productive in them.

But if you really want to know C, you should probably turn to a good book and/or the standards documentation. I don't necessarily feel this is worth a deep investigation, though. Unless you must use C, there are not very many areas where C makes more sense as a tool than C++ or some other languages.

It can be useful though; in the end its up to you. Nowadays I'd spend my time learning something more modern and interesting, but then again, I already have more years than I care to count under my belt with both C and C++.

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This topic is 3875 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

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