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chadsxe

Looking for a new compiler to use inside of Linux

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chadsxe    146
Hello, I am looking for some advice. I currently have been compiling programs in Fedor with the g++ compiler. I love the fact that its standards are much higher then that of something like VC++ 2005, but I hate the fact that there is no IDE. I really need to be able to debug stuff that is not run-time errors (i.e. logical stuff). So, what LINUX compiler has the comparable standards to g++ but has the IDE bells and whistles that something like VC++ offers up. I hear of Eclipse, KDevelop, and Anjuta. Are any of these capable of meeting my needs? Regards Chad

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ToohrVyk    1595
You've got your terminology the wrong way.

A compiler does not have an IDE: an IDE has a compiler. Ideally, you would keep g++, but use an IDE along with it (on Windows, you can use Visual Studio along with g++, if you want).

I agree that KDevelop is pretty good, you could definitely give it a try. So is Eclipse, but I only know of Eclipse being used for Java, so I can't tell for C++ usage. I have never heard of Anjuta.

I personally use emacs for all my Linux development.

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Antheus    2409
Quote:
I agree that KDevelop is pretty good, you could definitely give it a try. So is Eclipse, but I only know of Eclipse being used for Java, so I can't tell for C++ usage. I have never heard of Anjuta.


Eclipse has full C++ support, it's a separate branch of the project.

It's nice, would stand on equal grounds with MVS, but it unfortunately cannot hide the fact it was written for Java development (instant compilation, on-the-fly refactoring, one-file-one-class).

It also runs in Java, meaning it's a resource hog.

But those are details, the only real problem at the time I've used it (some 2-3 years ago), as compatibility with various Linux systems (java runtime + SWT's native drivers), which led to stability problems.

So my opinion is a few years old. If you don't encounter stability problems, then you get a MVS equivalent IDE (and much more in many cases).

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dave    2187
I use:

Compiler: gcc / g++
Debugger: DDD
Editor: Emacs/gedit/kedit

Alternatively you might like to look into CodeBlocks for an all round solution.

Dave

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Valere    248
I'm a big fan of eclipse, but I'll be the first to point out that it has a huge learning curve. Not as steep as emacs, but steep indeed. Still, it's a very powerful environment once you learn its quirks.

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Spoonbender    1258
Quote:
Original post by chadsxeI love the fact that its standards are much higher then that of something like VC++ 2005

It isn't. Both are fairly standards-conformant, none of them follow the standard to the letter. But if you think g++ is "a lot" more conformant than Microsoft's compiler, you must be basing it on older versions of VC++, because that's no longer the case.

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Ravyne    14300
By the way, Microsoft's latest compiler is no less compliant than GCCs -- neither have full support for the last ratified language spec. Both compilers are in the 98-99 percent compliancy range. GCC has better support for some issues, Microsoft's has better support for others. IIRC, of the two, Microsoft is actually *more* compliant by a small amount.

If you have another reason to use GCC then so be it, but standards compliancy is not really an issue unless you know you're in one of the dark corners of C++ that GCC supports but Microsoft doesn't. The bad reputation Microsoft enjoys is really only relevant to the 6.0 compiler. Microsoft's compiler is also one of the best optimizing C/C++ compiler, AFAIK, second only to Intel's own ICC compiler.

Oh, and Visual Studio's debugger kicks the crap out of any other.

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Palidine    1315
Quote:
Original post by ravyne2001
If you have another reason to use GCC then so be it


I think you missed the part where he said he was looking for a Linux IDE. [smile]

-me

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Ravyne    14300
I was actually aware of that -- I was simply pointing out that he may be avoiding Microsoft's compiler, and hence Windows, based on the false assumption that GCC is more standard compliant.

There are perfectly valid reasons to avoid microsoft's compiler, targetting linux/other OSs being the primary one.

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DaBono    1496
I'd like to add Code::Blocks to the IDEs you've heard of. I've not used it myself, but I've heard it's pretty good.

Anjuta, IMHO, is nothing more helpful than a good text editor, so I wouldn't go for that one.

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Replicon    306
If you're highly proficient in either vi or emacs, you don't need an IDE. All the candy-like IDE functionality can be added to those editors. You might have to write your own Makefile, but it seems like you've already got that part taken care of.

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