Sign in to follow this  

Trying again. Help me get started!

This topic is 3863 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hello community. About a year ago I tried to launch the development of an indie RPG together with some people I gathered from different indie communities (no known in real life). That project failed, and it was kind of easy to see the reason of it but I'm posting this message to hear your thought of my situation. I want to start again, with a different project but I want to do it right this time. So, what is my situation? I'm a young (21) student NOT studying anything to do with game development, I don't program, I don't draw, I practically don't do anything else with a PC than write schoolpapers and play games. Then, what DO I have in order to work with game development? Organizing skills. And a workable bit of leadership. And of course the will to do it. I surelly don't have time to work with it full time as university and work take up most time of the day but I sure would love to spend the extra hours I have on this. I also don't have an economy to mention so any (greater) fundings would have to come from elsewhere. But what are my experiences so far with game development and why did my previous project fail? To keep it short I don't have much experience at all but I learned a great deal during last year. I learned that development requires a lot of PLANNING as it's a lot harder to backtrack and change lane than it is to go the right way from the beginning. Also I learned that the team is EVERYTHING so it's very important that I take time setting it up and don't "hire" people that I don't need. Anyway, this post is ment for advices from you to me (and the community) and not the other way around so I'm leaving this open for you to continue. Let me just help you out with a few straight out questions: How much of the game (RPG genre again) should I develop alone before creating a team? Can I work as a (indie)developer without knowing anything about modelling/programming/scetching/etc? Where should I start when setting up the team? Programmers? Artists? Lore-writers? How should I set up the rules for working in the team? Deadlines? Communication requirements (like Skype or IRC)? How far should I aim? Being a part-time developer and newbie at that I don't expect a whole lot from my results but I also would like some results to be proud of. Where lies the balance? Thank you everyone in advance! Jakob 'Bofra' Calero Sweden

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello

I'm new in the genre but my situation is a lot like yours.
My educated(by books) guess on how much to build before you gather a team is:
You should have a good idea(best having it on paper) of what your games gonna be like playing, What you want the player to experience.
Also what kind of third party middleware you want your team to be using.
You should also be aware that writing a contract for the team members is a very
good idea and having sorted out things as what kind of reward they will get for work, who owns the project, who owns what they tribute to the work and what happens if say a publisher wants to buy the project.

As to ones ability to be a game developer without having programming, art or sound skills. You shouldn't worry too much. heck i don't do any of those things^^ but i'm still trying!!

Never give up man !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
How much of the game (RPG genre again) should I develop alone before creating a team?


You should have a solid design document and a functional (playable) prototype of your game before you begin "hiring" people. The reason being that without any monetary compensation, people are not likely to get excited about your project if there's nothing to see. I'm sure that some people in here will disagree with me on this one, but that's just my experience. Plus, if you have a design document and a prototype going, your project is a lot less likely to fail.

Quote:
Can I work as a (indie)developer without knowing anything about modelling/programming/scetching/etc?


Sure, if you're willing to learn. Remember, you don't need to be an excellent programmer or artist to create a prototype for your game. The purpose of building a prototype is for you (and your team) to see if the gameplay works out. Plus, if you later have other people do the actual coding/artwork, they will know that you've put serious thought and work into the project long before they did.

Quote:
Where should I start when setting up the team? Programmers? Artists? Lore-writers?


That doesn't really matter. Programmers and artists usually work on a game simultaneously. Having writers available to you early in the project can be very helpful though. But again, don't aproach them like "I want to make an RPG, will you write the story/quests/etc.". Instead, have a concept ready, present it to them and see what they come up with.

Quote:
How should I set up the rules for working in the team? Deadlines? Communication requirements (like Skype or IRC)?


Since you won't be paying your team, your authority towards them will be somewhat limited. Hence, you should only set-up rules that everybody can agree on. And also, you should be prepared that while you can and should set-up deadlines, people meeting them is a whole different story.

Quote:
How far should I aim? Being a part-time developer and newbie at that I don't expect a whole lot from my results but I also would like some results to be proud of. Where lies the balance?


The problem is that as soon as you have a team and your project fails, you will not only have wasted your own time, you will also have wasted the time of your team members (of course "wasted" is a bit harsh here because a failed project can still be a good learning experience). With the right amount of determination, even small teams can create big things. The reality however is, that most projects like the one you're planning eventually are discontinued. My suggestion therefore is that you work in iterations. Start with a small game and complete it. If you manage to do that, make a new iteration that has more features and so on and so forth. If at some point you feel really confident and your team is doing a good job and is motivated, go for it and make a big game. If you don't complete the big one, you'll still have a smaller game that you can be proud of.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic is 3863 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this