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dada222

Game development, how to start and climb the stairs of success

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Note: This is for beginners I am not a guru. I have just one year experience in game programming. But this is enough to tell you one or two things. First of all, when I began, I immediately wanted to program the sims 3. But then I understood that you must aim lower, and then higher and higher. I think the best way to begin game programming is to learn a BASIC language, so you can make simple text and graphical games. After that, you must learn C++. Then OpenGL, which is easier that DirectX. After all these, you shall start using a game engine, like chrystal space or Irrlicht, which are free. And, most important, DON'T GIVE UP

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I agree with you mostly, except at the end.
If I had to say the easiest graphical api to use would be XNA but that is in C#, which I also think should be looked at before C++. Helps you get into the OOP, bit easier to program, and when you want the tightly coded performance (lets not start an argument though) then you can move onto C++.

Just my opinion though! Have a good one!

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Original post by dada222
After that, you must learn C++.


This might cause an argument, but AFAIK it is true in a professionnal game programming context. You might want to learn another language before going on to C++. I found flash's actionscript to be useful even if it's an interpreted language. It helped me going to C++ (but C# might have helped me more).

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Original post by dada222
Then OpenGL, which is easier that DirectX. After all these, you shall start using a game engine, like chrystal space or Irrlicht, which are free.


I'm not sure about this... The purpose of using en engine is to simplify the creation of graphics/games by not programming directly with Direct3D or OpenGL. Using an engine will, in most cases, be easier than going the OpenGL/Direct3D route immediately. However, those APIs will be very useful to know about after some time to understand how things get done at a lower level.

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Original post by dada222
And, most important, DON'T GIVE UP


I think we can all agree on that ;)

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Well, i had done some c# before but I had to use classes all the time! It gives you much less freedom

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Well, i had done some c# before but I had to use classes all the time! It gives you much less freedom


Now THIS is really going to cause an argument! lol

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Damn didn't knew procedural programming was still used in game development ;) Isn't it the opposite, classes gives you more freedom and makes it easier for you to code because you don't have to rewrite everything you already written twice ? Well i'm not a C coder so I "might" be wrong.

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Well, i had done some c# before but I had to use classes all the time! It gives you much less freedom

No it doesn't, you can still write procedural code in C# (using static classes construct fake namespaces), and besides, "classes" don't limit you in any way. You're too focused on the implementation detail; a trait often developed by C++-only or highly C++-focused programmers.

Learning C++ is entirely unnecessary, unless you are going to be a professional game developer. However, if you're a beginner, you're not going to be a professional game developer and you will (in most cases) still have four years of college ahead of you before you can even begin to consider being a professional. Consequently, you should focus on a language that will help teach you the fundamentals of software design and development without bogging you down in implementation-specific cruft.

Although at the end of the day it is important to simply choose a language and learn it, and not switch around, C++ is still a very, very poor choice for an early language. Python or C# are much better choices. C++ is much easier to pick up as a third or fourth language, after which you will hopefully have a better understand of what is a general programming concept or paradigm and what constitutes language-specific implementation detail or idioms.

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I've been programming games as a hobby for something like 14 years and finally got a job a few months ago. here is the rough sequence of languages (and APIs) I used over the years:

1) GW Basic - it was all I had back then on my 8086
2) Quick Basic - hell of a lot easier then GW, one of my favorates.
3) C - Godly of god languages. I still use it today.
3.1) Win32 API

4) Blitz Basic/Blitz Basic 3D - This is an amazing language to learn graphical programming (2d and 3d) using very easy syntax. If you want to seriously make a prety good looking game but don't know much C/C++/C#/XNA then this is the language to get. This language taught me a lot about 3D game programming's basics and object control. Dark Basic is also very good from what I hear but I've never used it personally.

5) C++ - God's language made even more godly! I wouldn't have a job if I didn't know this language. Nuff said.
5.1) OpenGL
5.2) OpenAL
5.4) DevIL
5.3) SDL

6) C# - Solely for TOOLS, not for game dev. I am a low level guy so I haven't used this language yet for serious game design. I might in the future though just for fun to see how it fairs. (btw, I do like C# as an OOP language 100000x more then JAVA).

------------------------------------
now for the part where I get flamed
------------------------------------

JAVA is horrid. STAY AWAY FROM IT FOR ANYTHING GAME RELATED!

hope this helped,
-Linolium

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now for the part where I get flamed

I'm more inclined to flame you for your zealous reverence of C and C++, personally. They have their uses, but the power you attribute to them suggests you need to branch out a lot more (and a lot more extensively).

Try some functional languages.

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