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Likelihood of landing a job in GD?

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Is there a large demand for game developers? Finishing my junior year in high school, I've come to the realization that there isn't really anything else that I would rather be doing. I've got a good shot of getting into a decent college (several APs and expecting a good SAT score based on my PSAT), and I've already got plenty of experience in computers in general (this is the fourth PC I've built, and I've self-taught myself several languages from programming to web design, et cetera). I've had multiple dreams of career paths, but this is the only one that really has stood the test of time. I can't really picture myself happy doing anything else. So, I mean, I've got the ambition, but is there any room for me in the world of game development?

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If you get a college degree and gain skills in one of many relevant disciplines (programming, 3D modeling, music composition/SFX, business) then of course there is room. It's a booming industry; new jobs are made open all the time.

Is there a guaranteed place? If you don't work hard will there be a job? Of course not. You might be angry and swear at people in interviews and then you wouldn't get hired. You might have to start in kentucky. etc.

Since you are only in high school, there are almost zero career paths in the world that are out of your reach.

-me

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I just got really lucky. I am a junior in high school and I was taking some classes at the college near my house. My professor knows one of the guys working on Second Life and suggested me to work their for the summer, I don't know if I got it yet, it is down to me and another guy. It isn't bad though 15 dollars and hour for a 17 year olds summer job.

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I'd say there's lots of demand, as long as you're not too picky about where you start.

A lot of guys start off gunning for their "dream" job, they want to work on the next Halo or WoW. Competition for these kinds of jobs is extremely fierce, and the chances of getting one of those straight out of college is next to zero.

But if you don't mind a less-glamorous games job, (when I say "less-glamorous", I mean stuff like, games based on movies, games based on TV shows, games no one has heard of, handheld games, mobile games, flash games), then there's more demand than ever.

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You've got like 4-6 years before you are in the job market. Now is hardly the time to be asking that question, especially with the pace the game industry moves at. There will always be room for highly motivated and skilled talent, so if you are as driven as you imply you'll do fine.

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Some girl or guy calling herself/himself "RpgActioN" (whatever happened to human names?) wrote:

>Is there a large demand for game developers?

Yes. Depending.

>(yadda yadda yadda) is there any room for me in the world of game development?

I guess. Depends. Who are you, what are you good at? Read the FAQs.
http://www.gamedev.net/community/forums/showfaq.asp?forum_id=5
http://www.igda.org/breakingin/career_paths.htm
http://www.sloperama.com/advice.html
http://www.gamecareerguide.com/
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

Then after you read all the FAQs, we're always here to answer good questions and give you grief when you ask bad ones. (^_^)

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RPG,

Yes, there is room in the industry for talented individuals. Start preparing yourself early. Become very proficient at C++, C#, Lua, and Python. Each of which teach you different programming paradigms, and each offer different insight into efficient programming. Much like learning different spoken languages broadens your understanding of self, so too does learning multiple programming languages.

Once you're proficient in the languages above, pick up the available game development SDK's and start working on demos, tools, and anything else you're interested in. There's OpenGL/DirectX Graphics for graphics, use the Windows Message pump of User Input, there's various sound libraries, etc...The more you know, the more you can show employers you're familiar with and/or have mastered, the better off you are.

With all of that being said, I tend to read over poster's previous posts when I hear they're looking to join the industry. Unfortunately, your posts are not promising. You show a significant slant towards frustration, anger, and elitism. All of which will prevent you from completing the journey towards becoming a professional game programmer.

My advice, work on your inter-personal skills as well as your programming skills. Learn to relax, and interact with people and forums without expressing your inner frustration. Stop swearing. And finally, realize that game programming, as with any programming, is an endless grind of problem solving.

Each morning you sit down at your desk with a new set of problems that needs to be solved. Often others will be able to help you find the answer, but quite frequently, it will be up to you to find the solution. So if you find you get frustrated from problems without apparent solutions, or problem solving in general, you might consider an alternate career path.

I mean no disrespect, please accept this criticism in the spirit in which it was intended. I do wish you the best of luck, and if/when you enter the industry, I'm sure you'll find it an enjoyable, if not a challenging occupation.

Cheers!

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I made those posts over two years ago (I haven't been to this site in a while), and I whole-heartedly agree with your assessment of me then. I was fourteen, so, yeah. I'd like to think I've changed for the better - to be honest, I'm too embarrassed to even read back over my old posts, knowing what kind of person I was.

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I see. Well, welcome back. I look forward to reading your new posts and seeing what skills you've obtained and what information you've learned over the last two years.

Cheers!

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We are actively hiring entry level programmers! (And more experienced programmers, if that fits your expectations.)

Lots of 'em, for multiple new projects.


Of course, you are expected to have a college degree or finishing one up. And you need to be in the Salt Lake City area. But if that describes you, contact me and I'll make sure your resume and cover letter get in the right hands.

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The original poster implied he was 16 years old now. He doesn't likely have a college degree or is finishing one up. He's likely working on finishing his high school diploma.

Please read over the threads before posting unsolicited job offers. In fact, if you're planning to use GDNet to recruit, use the Game Jobs systems provided for that purpose, so that GDNet can at least get finders fees.

Cheers!

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Quote:
Original post by jwalsh
The original poster implied he was 16 years old now. He doesn't likely have a college degree or is finishing one up. He's likely working on finishing his high school diploma.
I misread high school. You are quite correct about the rest of it.

Quote:
In fact, if you're planning to use GDNet to recruit, use the Game Jobs systems provided for that purpose, so that GDNet can at least get finders fees.
Sadly, the company won't use GDNet or any other board posting other than their corporate site. Seeing as I'm not personally hiring, it would not be appropriate to advertise it that way of myself.

It was mainly meant as a comment that it is not difficult to land a job in game development once properly educated.

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Quote:
Stop swearing


I know this is good advice as it can definitely impact many aspects of your life. But it just gave me a good laugh. Three years ago I was working on a MMO and the executive producer swore more than anyone I had ever met. The "F" word was uttered at least once per sentence. Super great guy, but wow he could curse up a storm.

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