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godsenddeath

2 quick questions

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1. from what i gather there are quite a few experienced programmers on this board, what was the most common way for you to learn? like did you learn online, through books or have you taken courses? 2.i'm working with dev c++, i know many people suggest the free MS complier but since i'm so deep into learning C++ at the moment, i wanna wait till i'm really familiar with the language before i add another complication like familiarizing myself with a new compiler/IDE, anyways my 2nd question is i know there's something like 16 standard C++ headers, plus the C libraries, plus the STL, but I believe there are extra ones that come with DEV C++, and i'm wondering if anyone can point me to a reference for these

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Original post by godsenddeath
1. from what i gather there are quite a few experienced programmers on this board, what was the most common way for you to learn? like did you learn online, through books or have you taken courses?

First of all, I'm not among the experts here.
I started with books learning the basics of the language.
After I got broad band, online resources has been the most valuable resource.
Google has been awsome for looking up detailed info and error/warning messages.
Finally I took a computer science degree that gave me a much broader knowledge and made me familiar with several languages (not just C++), and how the PC (harware) works.

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2.i'm working with dev c++, i know many people suggest the free MS complier but since i'm so deep into learning C++ at the moment, i wanna wait till i'm really familiar with the language before i add another complication like familiarizing myself with a new compiler/IDE, anyways my 2nd question is i know there's something like 16 standard C++ headers, plus the C libraries, plus the STL, but I believe there are extra ones that come with DEV C++, and i'm wondering if anyone can point me to a reference for these

If you have a powerful PC I suggest the MS tools Platform SDK
It has a powerful debugger and a code completion that actually works =)

DevC++ is great as a light weight SDK, but I have turned off the code completion module (Slow and incomplete)
It uses the GCC compiler/linker as default so if you use this toolset your programs will probably compile right off the bat in linux/unix.

I have never noticed any serious differences between the MS and GNU compiler tools, but GCC(GNU) is AFAIK less likely to strain from the C++ standard.
The MS tools might have some extra non-standard functionality.

The only noticable difference is that, due to how the libraries are coded internally, there might be some difference in what headers include what other headers. This might lead to some confusion but its nothing missing. Sometimes I have to add a couple of extra headers when porting from MS to GNU.

I have never heared of any extra standard libraries for DevC++.
It does however have a package manager that will let you install non-standard APIs easily. Main menu -> Tools -> Check for updates/packages

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Original post by godsenddeath
1. from what i gather there are quite a few experienced programmers on this board, what was the most common way for you to learn? like did you learn online, through books or have you taken courses?
Me, I started out in BASIC with the source code to some games from a booklet, then modified them to see what would happen. Eventually someone lent me a copy of Kernighan and Ritchie's C book from which I moved to C; then a while later I started learning C++ (I think I used a For Dummies book there, actually).

Now that I'm at university to study computer science then I'm obviously taking courses, but that's only been for the past couple of years. I've been programming for about 16 years.

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2.i'm working with dev c++, i know many people suggest the free MS complier but since i'm so deep into learning C++ at the moment, i wanna wait till i'm really familiar with the language before i add another complication like familiarizing myself with a new compiler/IDE,
That's fairly sensible, though I would be careful about making statements like "really familiar" - very few people on the planet are what I'd consider "really familiar" with the language, so if I were you I'd just settle for "comfortable." That said, a good debugger can make it easier to learn what's going on; it's been a very long time since I used the dev-c++ integrated debugger so I don't know how good it would be for that...

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anyways my 2nd question is i know there's something like 16 standard C++ headers, plus the C libraries, plus the STL,
C++ headers /plus/ the STL? When you say C++ headers are you talking about the wrappers for the C headers - ctime, cmath, etc?

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Original post by superpig
I've been programming for about 16 years.
16 years? You must've started pretty young [wow]. Either that, or I have mistaken you for somebody else. Not meaning to sound too much like a stalker, but you're at Wadham, right?

Admiral

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I kind of grew up with it; when I was a kid we had a TRS-80. I got this magazine (I can't remember which one) but it had a program in every issue; the BASIC source code was written out, and you would type it in to try it out. Exploration by changing things around, and a little guidance from my dad helped me learn.

Eventually I took a class in PASCAL at my school; and then shortly after I started learning C. After figuring out how to run my PASCAL procedures with the C compiler, I got a book from the library and started porting what I could.

After that it was a lot of experimentation, hacking what other people had made, and the occasional book for Christmas to help me refine.

When it comes to more complex subjects, I usually hunt down a tutorial, distill out the parts unique to what I'm learning, and then after I get a decent overview, start researching the individual functions.

When I'm trying a new process, I prefer to bumble through it myself, and then look to see how other people are doing it. It helps to already understand what needs to be done, and let's me look more at why they're doing it, instead of just how,

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Original post by TheAdmiral
Off topic:

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Original post by superpig
I've been programming for about 16 years.
16 years? You must've started pretty young [wow]. Either that, or I have mistaken you for somebody else. Not meaning to sound too much like a stalker, but you're at Wadham, right?


Yep, that's right. Started at age 4.

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