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Bunch of Questions

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Hello again! I just finished my first graphical game (a snakelike clone) in XNA. However now that I have done this I want to be able to learn more. I have a few questions about fairly unrelated topics. If anyone could answer some of these questions you would be a big help. 1. I understand basic (very basic) XNA and was wondering where the best way to learn XNA and game programming is? (Books, Tutorials, anything) 2. I have taken math courses through 10th grade Geometry and was wondering what math and physics I need to learn for 2d games? 3. When you are working with a game dev team how do you spilit up the programming jobs. I mean how does everyones code all work together?(sorry I know its a vague question!) If one could answer any one of the questions it would be greatly appreciated.

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1. The XNA Creators Club is the best place for tutorials, samples, and demos on how to create cool things with XNA.

2. For 2D graphics you need very little math, as everything is pre-transformed into screen space. For 3D graphics, I'd recommend Linear Algebra, and Computer Graphics (Projections, etc...)

3. That is vague. Each person on the team is usually responsible for a few different systems, with some overlap in-between. ie. One person generally does AI, one does Sound, one does Physics, etc...For larger teams it's not uncommon to have 2 people assigned to some of the same systems. We humorously refer to this as the project's "Truck Number". That is, how many people need to get hit by a truck before there's a system no one knows how to work with, and we're thus royally screwed. The higher the truck number, the better.

Cheers!

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1- The ramblings of a hazy mind: Goes into details you might not use, but reading the tutorials and downloading the sources can help.
Riemers XNA tutorials : Lots of info. Good shader tutorials, in case you eventually need one.

2. Wait until you find you need some math. When you do, study that area; not only the concrete part you need, also some theory around it.
The reason I suggest you to do that is: you might need some math, some of it not easy, but it's always the same parts.

3. The distribution of projects between different programmers is learned by experience and is very hard to explain.
Your question is the basis of a large amount of study and work. Keep trying to find an answer though, if you find you're good at organizing a group of people on a single project, you might have found one of the best paying professions. [smile]


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