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Deadcell

New: A Question about 3D Engine

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Hey "Dev"-ers! This question isn't about "how do i get started with making games??"" But I was reading an article posted by a noobishly noobish noob (NNN) like that, and a reply from a polished vetran said what you needed to get started was (software wise): 1) A 3D asset creator -- I have Maya COmplete and am Ok with it (But i can't figure out rigging at ALL) 2) A 2D Asset creator -- I have Photoshop and can put together UV texture maps and paint over them 3) A Text Editor -- I have UltraEdit Demo version but if anyone could offer advice on a free version that would be great 4) A game engine -- I have the Neula 2 SDK engine but dont know how the heck to use it Yeah so that's what is said i needed. But here's my real question .. What the heck does a game engine do, and if a program in the compiler/text editor, how does the engine use that to make your game and how can you program internal animations (character animations??) I know you can program a character model to move in the X,Y, and Z axis, but how can you program an engine to execute an animation you made in Maya?? It doesn't make sense ... .. Yeah and if someone could offer me advice on a free compiler/text editor and how i can use Nebula 2 after some preogramming experience i'd worship you (C++ and Direct X, i guess) ONE LAST QUESTION even though i have asked SO MUCH: Are there any good level design books that don't use the UnrealTools Level Editor???? THANKS SO MUCH IF ANYONE CAN JUST ANSWER ONE QUESTION THAD BE HELPFUL

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The animation info from Maya would be saved in some known format in the model file. Then the engine would ready in that format and it would have to know what to do with that specific format, so the engine much be coded specifically for every model format you want to support.

How the information in the model format affects the 3D scene is determined by the specific engine's scene management implementation. Usually a scene graph. That gets into the nitty gritty, and from the sound of it you won't need to know that part.

All you need to know is what format the engine you want to use accets. Game engines are very complex peices of software thatmake it so people can concentrate on making games rather then graphics programming, and user input, and a whole load of other complex crap that isn't strictly game related. They are kind of like Operating Systems for games.

Idk anything about Nebula 2. If your using C++, try Code Blocks ( www.codeblocks.org ) for your editor, its awesome.

From what I know, the Unreal Tools are seconds to none, thats why theres so much info about that. A close second are the tools for the Half-Life series, World Craft and such. As for books idk... i just always used online tutorials.

Hope that helps!

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As for the level design books, it doesn't matter which tool they use. The idea is to learn the concepts of level design, not to hold your hand through level creation. They just use those tools because they are very popular. You can easily apply the same ideas to any equally-capable level editor. You may have to make adjustments based on each editor's abilitys and user interface, but the general idea should remain the same.

Any of your questions about playing animations and moving characters in the engine are better suited to the FAQs, API reference, or even forum for the engine you are using. Each engine implements features differently, so you'd probably want to check with the developer on that one.

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Thanks so much u guys i guess it makes sense now ...
I DOn't think I'll use nebula 2. Maybe I can find a better user-friendly engine.
As for UnrealTools, i was just worried they concepts couldn't be carried over to Maya. Thanks anyway

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That's awesome that you can afford to buy Maya Complete AND Photoshop, but you can't spring the $29 for a decent text editor. Spoken like a true game development executive - you have a definite future in the business!

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For C++ development I recommend Visual C++ from Microsoft
The Express Edition is a simplified version of the one used by the real professionals! But you have to remember two things, the first is that if you're not a professional you wont have actually used the stripped features so you wont miss them and the second is that the compiler in the Express Edition is exactly the same one as in the Professional Edition, so theres nothing holding you back from creating an equally performant application - and its completely free, no strings attached, which I think is damn charitable of Microsoft [smile].

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