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dusty_one

anyone still use vi/m?

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I'm just curious if anyone here still uses vi(or vim) as their source editor. Currently its my editor due to it being light weight and I'm used to it since its installed in every unix/linux console I've ever touched. Only thign that bugs me about it is that, even with some interesting plugins, its pretty limited for a big project. I still haven't gone beyond section 3 in the C++ primer, but I know that once I start on my first few games that the lack of of tools for easing the pains of a big project are going to annoy me.

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I do use it at home and at work. I actually adopted Vim only recently, because I got frustrated to the fact that my previous favorite editor (KDE's Kate) was not as widely available as Vim. Kate and kioslaves actually was a very nice combination, as I could open files from practically any machine I wanted over ssh, samba, ftp or whatever but the problem struck when I was on a non-KDE or non-unix machine or I did not have access to X Windows.

If I can manage 10000+ lines of code projects with Vim, you should be able to do that too. It's not that much about what editor you are using but what build system, documentation system, version control software, etc you use. Some of these features are built-in in some IDEs, which is why some people prefer IDEs over editor and command line. I prefer having a good and simple editor without that many bells and whistles and a set of command line tools to keep my projects in order.

Stick with Vim if you like it. You might want to check out other editors/IDEs, but if they feel cumbersome and/or there is no productivity increase, you can always go back to Vim.
-Riku

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I am using vi from time to time for a bit of scripting or for quick-and-dirty hacks. If I had the time to drill myself in using vi, I'd definitely use it more frequently. I'm a avoid-teh-mouse-wherever-possible-dude :)

But for coding in general, I also love those lightweight scintilla based editors/IDE's (Anjuta, SciTE, and at work notepad++ (win)).

semper vi!

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I hate having to use the mouse. When I'm gaming, sure, np, great input device. When I'm trying to do work...it drives me up the wall whenever I need to tkae my hand off the keys. It disrupts my flow..which is why I love vi/m so much. Really I just wanted to see if I was crazy wanting to stick to vim when working on something that would take very many lines of code like a game.

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I use vim whenever I have to edit anything over an ssh connection (occasionally I've done things with X going through ssh so I can get a GUI, but it's not worth it just to edit a file).

I can understand why someone would want to use it as their main editor, but I don't think I'd want to work a lot without things like intellisense and a pretty display (which is, in some ways, more information rich).

Something I may look into (for laughs) is ViEmu, which is a vim-like editing mode for Visual Studio (and various other things like Word and so on). Looks like it's not free though.

John B

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Vi/vim is easily integrated with external tools; grep and ctags, together with feedback of compiler error messages, files and line numbers, should be more than enough to navigate a large codebase.
Other tools like those riku mentions (configuration control, compiling and packaging, running tests, debugging...) must be set up on their own, and invoking them from a text editor or IDE is only a convenient possibility.

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I use Vim at home for my own projects and use ViEmu that JohnBSmall linked above while at work. Once accustomed to how things worked (movement by hjkl took me a while to get used to) I feel so much more efficient than using a regular text editor.

There are plenty of plugins available to help manage larger projects. Ctags should come with any Vim installation and one plugin I found handy was Project which basically adds a project explorer in a split pane.

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I probably would use vim more if I ever took the time to get to know it enough. I use Eclipse+CDT as my IDE right now, and I have a project with 100+ files. I've never found a good way to use vim with many files at the same time. I often have several files open at the same time, and I like Eclipse tabs, and the fact that Eclipse remembers which files I was working on last time.

However, I recently started playing with python a bit, and found that vim was very good when writing python code. I've learnt some basics with vim now, and I can definitely see how good an editor it can be if you only take the time to learn it properly.

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I'm hooked on Vim, I started using it a long time ago (7+ years I think) and now I keep typing Vim commands in to any other editor by accident. Which is one of the reason why I prefer to create my documents using LaTeX.

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This tip helped me out quite a bit:

http://www.vim.org/tips/tip.php?tip_id=1439

I use vim together with other powerful unix tools (egrep, sed, awk, etc.), and I think these tools works great in large projects.

christer.

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I only use it when I need to (for example if I am remotely working on php scripts) but in general I try to avoid it and work with a graphical environment.

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iI hate vim.[esc]:%s/hate/love/
[wink]

The built-in regex, easy to do repeatitive tasks, fast, handles huge files easily, is available for almost any platform, etc, etc, etc. Keyboard only, which is great, or use gvim if you want some mouse input as well.

CipherCraft

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Most of my friends have been trained now to ignore the:
i's, dd's, ^dw's, $a's, and R's that randomly pop up in our IM conversations now. Now they see a few of those and realize I'm working on something so tell me to IM them later..which I forget to do and it starts the whole mess all over again..

; edit

As an aside, I absolutely abhor emacs.

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I can get by in vim, but I find memorising all the commands and so on laborious. There's no doubting it's a powerful editor and environment, but generally I prefer the Windows-style editors which are much less opaque to use. On Linux I try and use Kate or KDevelop where possible.

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Learning vim was definately a bear. After a bit it became muscle memory to do the commands. Half the time I couldn't list the last 4 commands I exicuted. I saw what I needed to do and it translated to action :) .

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I've used vim on a non-trivial project of about 30 kLOC. I loathe emacs not just because it feels bloated, but perhaps because the commands were more obfuscated than necessary.

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I use Emacs quite a bit, mostly for TeX though also for the odd bit of programming. I haven't used it for anything sizable yet but I can see it being very good for large projects provided you're competent at using it (currently I only know the basic commands, I need to learn more about it before I could use it for anything large).

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I use it all the time. You can actually set it up to do a lot of things, and I still learn little tricks every now and then, which increase my productivity. It's currently cooking my breakfast, in fact ;-).

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When the memory gluttony of MSVS makes me feel unclean, I turn to VIM and the command line to shrive me of my sins.

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I alas still do for c++ coding. It's okay, but having used msvc# for a large project I cannot use vi (or c++ much) without the sharp pain of knowing something better.

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I use gvim on Windows and Linux for quick text editing, but I've switched to TextMate on OS X, where I do most of my editing.

Vim with CScope works great for large projects.

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I use Vim both for work and home. For big projects you might want something like the vim project plugin, and ctags is a necessity.

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