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bert eats dirt

C++ for a non-newbie

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Hi all (first post :-)) I'm one semester away from graduating with a Bachelor of Information Technology with a major in Games Technology, and would like to get into the games industry as a programmer but I don't feel confident programming in C++. I've received very good grades in programming subjects I've taken (no less than a Distinction level), but the C++ guff I've learned in my course has been lacklustre. I went to the course coordinator for the degree I'm taking asking if there was another C++ subject I could take and she said no, and suggested I teach myself C++. So that's what I intend to do :-) The programming subjects I've taken have been mostly about Java and C# and I have no real-world experience programming (only assignments and such). So here's my question: I'm putting together a list of C++-specific topics for me to study in my own time. Given where I am now, what would you C++/games programming veterans recommend to me? Thanks in advance!

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Hi,

Learn by doing.

You don't strictly need any books because the internet is a wealth of information, however there are some books that are useful. I'm sure you can be enlightened by the others here on book choice.

The way i learned C++ was to just do it. Think of something you want to do and do it, you'll probably come up with some rubbish solutions to begin with, but it you will always feel you could do it better.

Dave

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I would recommend you write several non trivial C++ programs. Doing this will force you to deal with all the obscure errors and stuff C++ seems determined to throw at you.

Games are good for this. All the C++ I know comes from the games I've made and these forums.

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The book I learned C++ from is Thinking in C++, which can be downloaded from here (for free!). I don't necessarily recommend it as the best book but it does an excellent job at explaining specific topics (inline fuctions, copy constructors, ...) and various pitfalls you should watch out for, and gives a deeper understanding of the language than most books (like what the compiler is doing and why).

By your study plan and the fact that you're not a beginner I think you should definetly take a look at it (make sure you look at both volumes).

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did you read the C++ FAQ?
Do you know GOF's design patterns already?
do you know STL, and not just vector cout and string?
Do you know what C++ does behind the scene?
Have you done (and debugged) a 50+ files project in C++?

ps. there is also Sutter's columnGuru of the week

There are subjects which are not C++ specific but also useful:
multi-tasking programming, SQL, network, more I can't think of now...


Iftah.

[Edited by - Iftah on June 11, 2007 8:05:49 AM]

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