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Visual Studio 6

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I'm currently checking into learning C++ at as long term hobby. I havn't done any programming for years...to be honest, since my Commodore 64. Prior to that was Basic/Extended Basic on a TI-99 4/a. I have an opportunity to pick up Visual Studio 6 for nothing. After doing some checking it seems it was released in 1998, a tad dated. My question is am I better off picking up a more current version or will this suffice for experimenting/learning with the latest 3d engines. I do like the visual environment. Thank you for any suggestions and please pardon my temporary ignorance.

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vc++ 6 is a bit old.
Get Visual C++ Express instead - it's free and does just about everything you'd ever need.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/visualc/

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Original post by rfterdarc
Get Visual C++ Express instead - it's free and does just about everything you'd ever need.

It doesn't make sandwiches.

Aside from that, another recommendation for Visual Studio 2005 (if only the Express edition). I actually prefer 2003 over 2005 for C++, because I hate the concept of manifests and SxS binaries, despite how "necessary" they may be in the modern world.

But 6 is a piece of trash, get something better ASAP.

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you can also try Turbo C++, form the company formally known as Borland, though from what i heard it is slightly crippled (you can still use it commercially, but i think making your own DLLs and using libraries is kaputza). registration kinda sucks too.

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Thank you for the responses. I've decided to pick up a copy of Visual Studio 2005. Now, there is a Standard version and a Pro version. The Pro costs approximately twice as much as the standard. In another post, I read an opinion that the Pro version isn't worth the extra money. I've checked the MS comparison chart ( http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/aa700921.aspx ) and again my ignorance weighs heavy. In a different thread is seems a lot of people use the Pro version as opposed to the Standard, there must be a reason. Any additional information would be greatly appreciated.

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Original post by Ainshent
Thank you for the responses. I've decided to pick up a copy of Visual Studio 2005. Now, there is a Standard version and a Pro version. The Pro costs approximately twice as much as the standard. In another post, I read an opinion that the Pro version isn't worth the extra money. I've checked the MS comparison chart ( http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/aa700921.aspx ) and again my ignorance weighs heavy. In a different thread is seems a lot of people use the Pro version as opposed to the Standard, there must be a reason. Any additional information would be greatly appreciated.


The differences between Standard and Pro seem mostly centered around server issues which I doubt you'll encounter as a beginner. And the difference between the express edition and the standard edition aren't that great wither.

Seriously, get the express edition of the language you're interested in. By the time you get to the point where you'll want to use the extra functionality there will be newer editions of Visual Studio out. In fact, there will probably be a new C++ standard specification by then as well. The express editions are free, what do you have to lose?

Lastly, why start with C++? My opinion would be to start with C# as you are miraculously given the chance to develop games with XNA that will be able to run on the X-Box 360. But you seem to have made up your mind so I won't push it.

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Original post by Ainshent
Thank you for the responses. I've decided to pick up a copy of Visual Studio 2005. Now, there is a Standard version and a Pro version. The Pro costs approximately twice as much as the standard. In another post, I read an opinion that the Pro version isn't worth the extra money. I've checked the MS comparison chart ( http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/aa700921.aspx ) and again my ignorance weighs heavy. In a different thread is seems a lot of people use the Pro version as opposed to the Standard, there must be a reason. Any additional information would be greatly appreciated.

Go with the free Express version.
Especially if you're just starting out, you won't need any of the other versions.

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If you're going to buy a copy, I'd throw in another vote for the Standard edition. I've been using it for awhile, and haven't found any "missing" features thus far.

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Original post by Mushu
If you're going to buy a copy, I'd throw in another vote for the Standard edition. I've been using it for awhile, and haven't found any "missing" features thus far.


there isnt anything missing in standard , it's just that's there nice additions in pro , if it's twice the money i'd say (but that's personal opinion) that standard has no use unless your budget is really tight , either go with the free express or with the pro if you need the extra (& if the comparison chart makes no sense to you , don't even bother , go with the free express , can always upgrade later)

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Original post by nobodynews

Lastly, why start with C++? My opinion would be to start with C# as you are miraculously given the chance to develop games with XNA that will be able to run on the X-Box 360. But you seem to have made up your mind so I won't push it.




C# is easier to do complex stuff in, but on the flip side of that C++ is easier for simple things. "Hello World" and other beginner subjects are easier to understand in C++. You're not forced to deal with OOP like you are in C#. I would highly recommend starting with C++ for your early text-based procedural stuff, then moving to an Object Oriented language once you have the basics down.

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