• Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  

Developing For Other OS's On Linux

This topic is 3865 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Ok, I admit it. I'm a windows guy and always have been, but now I'm looking to branch out. So Linux....let me get this straight, can you develop software for Windows/Macs on Linux?? I'm assuming you can from what I've read of it. Can anyone help me out? Thanks, Levi P.S. I know this is probably a dumb question, but I've gotta start somewhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
$50 - www.parallels.com

Lets you load an OS inside of another OS, so if you're a Windows guy and want to make your Linux development easier then this will probably help you, no rebooting to a different OS and you don't have to have a second machine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes. Develop on Linux, and test on the other platforms.

Do you have Linux? Have you programmed on it before? Try it.

What language are you using?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am planning to try it...I'm just doing the research before I dive in and break my neck. :)

I use C++/C right now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Portable applications? One source builds on any platform?

MFC/DX/Windows specific stuff? Using API that cannot be ran on a certain platform?

Cross-platform and cross-compilation? Creating assembly that the architecture you're on cannot execute?

Computer languages (almost all of them) are completely platform agnostic. But languages themself tend to be pretty useless. It all comes down to what you want, and there you start depending on the APIs and libraries. It's also where the real fun starts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I understand that languages are not platform specific. What I was wondering is if I could build on Linux using API's and stuff from windows and macs(therefore building applications that can be run on windows and macs). So what I'm seeing is that the answer is yes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by levjs
I understand that languages are not platform specific. What I was wondering is if I could build on Linux using API's and stuff from windows and macs(therefore building applications that can be run on windows and macs). So what I'm seeing is that the answer is yes.


Your questions are too general. You can run Linux, and Windows in Wine to run emulated Windows platform on that system.

Can you use gcc to build applications depending on Windows API in native Linux? Most likely (or certainly) not - depends on API.

The real question is why do you want that. Development of portable software or cross-compilation are two completely different things. First is a coding technique, the other is overcoming practical limitations (using one physical machine to build for several platforms).

The real question here is how much benefit do you hope to gain. Running emulated windows environment so that you can build various Windows API dependant parts doesn't bring any benefits by itself, unless it's part of larger toolchain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok, here's what I'm going for. I have certain apps that I've created for and in Windows which I want to port to Macs. Now, I don't have the money to buy a Mac to develop on, so I'm wondering if Linux would cut it for what I'm trying to do.

Thanks
Levi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What kind of libraries do these apps use? If they use a lot of Windows libraries, you are probably going to have to replace them with cross-platform libraries that do the same things. You could definitely develop the port on Linux, but you could just as easily develop on Windows. Just make sure to test on both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OpenGL for Graphics...
Sound I can use OpenAL...



Ok, I'm starting to understand this better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As everyone else has been saying, it mostly comes down to the API's.

Fortunately you said you wrote it with OpenGL, which makes porting to Linux or a Mac a whole lot easier! I actually write all my applications on Linux, and for graphics based work tend to use SDL for the window management side and OpenGL for the actual drawing. When porting, if it doesn't compile in Windows off the bat I just put any Windows specific stuff in #ifdef WINDOWS blocks =)

Since Linux tends to be open, I've found this to be a fairly successful strategy. If you have used any windows specific libraries at all (DirectX for example) it starts getting *much* more difficult.

Good luck! =)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement