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Programming Industry

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Hi, Can someone who works in the industry give me some advice? I'm interested in knowing which language is most used in the programming industry? for Video Games? for Software? for anything else? Ben

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I would say C++ is the most commonly used in the games industry. The caveat being that C++ is used for main game engine things while tools development is firmly shifting toward using C# or other higher level languages.

Basically, if you can stuff as much knowledge into your head as possible about a variety of different programming languages, this will benefit you greatly.

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I don't work in the industry, but my guess is that for companies with large amounts of basecode you'd be using C or C++. For new business / enterprise software and game tools(basically anything GUI heavy) you'd be using C# or Java. There's also scripting languages like Python, Ruby and Lua.

Anyway the concepts and problem solving involved in programming are much more important then what the currently most used language is, languages come and go. When I started programming everything was C or "C with classes" and VB(pre .Net) was the choice for making quick GUI programs, now all 3 are considered awful. As zdlr said, try to expose yourself to as many different languages and paradigms as possible.

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I read somewhere that C++ was not used for video game development (i think in the introduction thread to the CPP workshop - it was a reply to the idea). Obviously, thats not true...

If i were to start programming, with the hope of getting into the industry (i want to study Computer Science in Uni), i should start with C++ and C#, then maybe Java. Are Python, LUA and Ruby less important because they are scripting languages?

Ben

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If you want to start programming, I'd recommend Lua, Python, and Ruby - in that order.

Scripting languages are very important, especially in games. In fact, video games were one of the first pieces of software to regularly use multiple languages for a single project (for example, an engine written in C or C++ and the game logic itself written in a higher level language like Lua or Python). Virtually every game out there, except for really simplistic ones, will have a scripting system of some kind. Knowing how to use these languages is critical to being able to work in the industry.

From there C# is a great direction to go, partly because of XNA (which will get you comfortable with working with the kind of tools used in the industry), and partly for some diversity in the kinds of projects you work on.

Once you have a solid programming basis and understand the overall concepts, you can move down to lower-level languages like C++. Definitely do not start with C++, though, if you can at all possibly avoid it.

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Ok, im going to follow the C# workshop, so i'm not going to have chance to learn any scripting language before then...

If the chances of me ending up developing games is low, and im probably going to do some othepart of programming, are the scripting languages still as important? Or would it be better to learn c++ after C#, leaving the scripting til last...

Ben

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I haven't used Lua or Ruby at all, but Python is very useful if you need to slam some kind of tool or simple program out. Only for heavy duty number crunching is C++ better than Python; for non-game/simulation/3D-modeling applications, Python's ease of use is more important than C++'s speed. Also, most common C++ libraries have Python wrappers these days, and I've heard it's not too hard to create them with Boost::Python.

Once you've learned something like Java or C++, you can usually pick up another language, to the point that you can be productive in it, in under a week. Once you've got the concepts down, it's just a matter of figuring out the syntax, and checking the library documentation when you hit snags.

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