Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
godsenddeath

2 General Questions

This topic is 4046 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

i have 2 questions 1. from what i gather, assembly is kind of abstract nowadays due to modern hardware configurations and the sheer size of applications, but i'm wondering, is it important to at least have some knowledge of it if you want to become a professional programmer/developer(games, software), and if so, how firm should this knowledge be? just enough to be able to understand it? or being able to write it well? 2. what is MFC? i've been looking around for windows programming books and i also stumble across books teaching MFC for windows. i'm aware of what the win32 API is but thats about it. thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Quote:
Original post by godsenddeath
1. from what i gather, assembly is kind of abstract nowadays due to modern
hardware configurations and the sheer size of applications, but i'm wondering,
is it important to at least have some knowledge of it if you want to become a professional programmer/developer(games, software), and if so, how firm should this knowledge be? just enough to be able to understand it? or being able to write it well?

its not as much having knowledge of assembly as having knowledge of how a computer actually works at its lowest level, and learning assembly can help you learn that

Quote:
Original post by godsenddeath
2. what is MFC? i've been looking around for windows programming books and i also stumble across books teaching MFC for windows. i'm aware of what the win32 API is but thats about it.

its a a library for building windows applications with button, text boxes and labels, though i personally i don't think its a particularly good one

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The win 32 api is straght C. MFC is a C++ object oriented interface to the win 32 api. I haven't worked with it much, but from what I understand it is rather poorly done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1. Like Kaze said, it is good to know how a computer works at that level, and it can come very much in handy to be able to read the assembly a compiler gives you. Knowing how to read it can let you see what a compiler does with a piece of code and find tricky bugs. I would not learn how to write it well though - it is pretty challenging.

2. MFC is an object oriented library designed for basic GUI apps. It is poorly designed, old and buggy. If you want something like that there's .NET from Microsoft and a few good cross-platform libs like wxWidgets and Qt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also just to clarify when people say that assembly is very hard they mean that it's very difficult to manage any non-trivial code. The language is extremely simple compared to higher level languages. This makes it difficult because the most trivial operations must be implemented by hand using long sequences of very low level instructions, and thus things quickly get very complicated. Think of trying to define walking by issuing commands from a list of:
 
set lower limb <index>
rotate thigh about hip <a> degrees
rotate leg about knee <a> degrees
rotate foot about ankle <a> degrees

Without abstractions it gets very difficult to see the big picture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MFC stands for Monkey Fucking a Coconut

if you listen to dane cook, he explains it all

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!