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What did you pro's study?

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Hello all, my question is rather simple: what did you graphics artists and 3d modelers study? The reason I am asking is because I am planning to (seriously planning) get my masters degree. I now have a bachelor in IT and three years of experience as a programmer/software engineer, but I feel that I want to extend my skill set from a purely scientific to a more artistic end. And I'm wondering what my options are. So I am hoping you could provide me with some answers or tips. thanks in advance!

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I'm about to graduate with my B.S. of Computer Graphics Technology at Purdue University. It is fairly competitive to get into (they only let 60 people in with my class, but somehow I got in), but an awesome degree in my opinion. There are core CGT classes that everyone takes and then breaks down into four specializations - Construction Graphics, Interactive Multimedia, Virtual Product Integration (basically Manufacturing Graphics), and Computer Animation. In the Computer Animation specialty (200 level and above), the classes offered are:

Intro to Computer Animation
Interactive Simulation and Game Development
Digital Lighting and Rendering
Motion for Computer Animation
Digital Video and Audio
Advanced Topics in Computer Animation (Group project based animation class)
The History and Technique of Visual Effects in Film
Digital Postproduction

You work with Maya pretty extensively, but also get your hands dirty with Photoshop work, scripting, Adobe Premiere and After Effects, and more. The ironic thing, though, is that I'm going into game design, not graphics work. [wink]

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Quote:
Original post by Genjix
study is shit. Many pros just train hard. Learn to draw.

Really? Is that why you're not a paid professional, 'cause you worked so hard?

A formal education shows a lot of things to an employer. One is that you're not a one trick pony. So you can draw anime characters really well. Do you understand the underlying anatomy well? So you can make something move on the screen. Do you fully understand the 12 animation principles AND HOW TO EFFECTIVELY IMPLEMENT THEM? Can you work well in groups? Studying at a university gives you the chance to meet peers and work on projects together.

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Seriously, art directors will look at your portfolio, if it's crap, they won't even check your resume so they will never know what fancy school you went to.

However, not everyone can get professional level skills by themselves. So the name of the school isn't important, the name of the program isn't, what you learn from it is important. What you need to learn depends a lot of what you want to do. Anatomy, color and compositions are basics that you will need no matter what.

I studied 3D but never worked in 3D, I'm a 2D artist and animator. I learned the foundations by myself.

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it is quite true you can learn a lot yourself. i've just recently started taking some art classes at my college. and granted they're nothing majorly advanced, but i've already taught myself nearly everything they have went over so far, i have picked up some new things but i can honestly say i could have easily skipped those classes and not be affected.
however, it is not what you've learned in those classes that is important. if your portfolio looks good then you have a chance of being hired. however if your portfolio is good and you've shown you're willing to learn and put forth effort by showing that you've taken classes, you'll then have an even greater chance.
however not even considering that aspect it is also true that classes may help some get better or may help them progress further.
so i would atleast consider going to classes genjix.

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One important aspect of attending a university is networking. Having a great portfolio is one thing, but knowing the right people to show your portfolio to is an entirely different thing. My connection with my university and the projects I have worked on have enabled me to communicate with some pretty heavy weight game designers, which is my chosen field.

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College:
-You get discounts on software, conferences, events like GDC and Siggraph.
-You may not be set up a home studio for animation, sculpting and painting but most school has atudios for each.
-You get to know people, who happen to know other people
-You get more resources than you would probably get by yourself
-You show your potential employer that you have what it takes to complete a degree
-You get to work with other people, therefore teamwork
-You will learn working with deadlines and how to manage your time better
-You learn art history, some may disagree but I think this is important
-Most educational institutions have courses about portfolio building


Not College:
-With book and self dicipline you can learn a lot
-With communities like this you can still network to an extent.
-You show you potential employer that you are a self driven individual
-You can work on portfolio stuff more

----With or without college----

----Sculpting----
-By learning the form better you will get better at 3D modeling
*This works both ways, 3d moeling can make you better at sculpting too

----Painting----
-You learn color, composition, visual perception etc. These are very important


*I would and did go with college education.




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Quote:
Original post by Genjix
study is shit. Many pros just train hard. Learn to draw.


Ok, just to elaborate on my reasons asking for an education and not just "train hard" besides my 40-hours-a-week-job: discipline. I know myself well enough that I can't learn or focus on a new subject when I am occupied with other stuff, like my job. Plus there are too many other subjects, related to my job, that I want to explore in my spare time.
So I decided will quit my job, go back to university, and dedicate myself to a new subject without distractions.

zer0wolf, thanks for the suggestion. I really sounds like an awesome education you have there. And a colleague who also graduated at Purdue says it's a great university.
Sadly the USA in general is not an option because the tuition is way too high for me to finance. But I will definitely have a look around for "Computer Graphics Technology" educations.

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