Sign in to follow this  

Which Linux Distro?

This topic is 3821 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I've been looking into Linux lately because I'm programming a game that needs to run both on linux and windows. I might give the code over to somebody else to be ported for OSX. While working on this project I'm also writing a persuasive research paper based on Linux and Windows. So, I would like to know the following from the linux users out there: What is your favorite linux distro? What kernel is it based off of? What do you use your distro for? Which linux distro do you use to program C/C++ programs? Which distro provides the most development tools? Thanks and I look forward to hearing back from you guys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by caldiar
I've been looking into Linux lately because I'm programming a game that needs to run both on linux and windows. I might give the code over to somebody else to be ported for OSX. While working on this project I'm also writing a persuasive research paper based on Linux and Windows.


Ubuntu gets recommended a lot, and it sounds perfect for your needs.

Quote:
What is your favorite linux distro?


Gentoo. Because you compile everything from source, your entire system - kernel, drivers, apps - is completely optimized for your hardware. As long as you don't change your hardware frequently, you have a wicked fast OS. On the flip side, Gentoo has one of the longest and most difficult installations I've tried, but I admit I haven't tried many.

Quote:
What kernel is it based off of?


They're using 2.6.20 now.

Quote:
What do you use your distro for?


Everyday stuff. I run a personal web server, do minor software development, browse the web and toy with new software in Linux. It'll run some games, but it's usually just easier to switch for XP for gaming, and Visual Studio is still my IDE of choice most of the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
What is your favorite linux distro?
Which linux distro do you use to program C/C++ programs?

Slackware

Quote:
What kernel is it based off of?

Not sure what the current release is using, but I'm using 2.6.21

Quote:
What do you use your distro for?

Everything daily: programming, graphics, surfing the intertubes

Quote:
Which distro provides the most development tools?

I'm not sure, but I usually recommend Ubuntu to people starting off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use SuSE since version 4.x because at that time it was the distro with the largest list of included programs to play with. Then I became a regular user and stick with it... I love it! but I don't use it nowadays because of: 1. games, 2. Visual studio, 3. directX

[Edited by - VerMan on July 12, 2007 3:48:10 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use an old slackware (I guess it was 9.0 or 10.0 maybe?) with a 2.6 kernel, and use it for everything except games and visual studio. I use to install everything "by hand" (compiling), it was the reason why I install it. But I think I will try ubuntu as soon as I bought a new computer :)

I think whatever distro you choose, you will have all developpement tool needed (I use mostly emacs for code writing, gcc/Makefile/scons etc). The only "big" problem with linux is the debuger, gdb, which is not as easy to use as visual studio.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by caldiar
What is your favorite linux distro?


Debian GNU/Linux on pretty much all architectures.

On x86, I also quite like Zenwalk, a Slackware-based distro using the XFCE environment. It's very sleek.


Quote:

What kernel is it based off of?


On my main system, running Debian 'SID' (Still In Development): 2.6.21.


Quote:

What do you use your distro for?


Everything. I haven't owned a Windows or Mac system for many years. I only recently purchased a Mac and a PC so I can port some of my code, and I don't think I've booted either of them in the past month.


Quote:
Which linux distro do you use to program C/C++ programs?


When I must code in C or C++, I simply use my distro of choice (Debian). However, there are so many languages available in the free software world than using C or C++ usually isn't a requirement for me.


Quote:
Which distro provides the most development tools?


Depends on what you call "development tools", I guess. I'd say Debian because it provides more non-mainstream languages and implementations (OCaml, Common Lisp, Scheme, Boo, Scala, Smalltalk, Prolog, Erlang, Oz, ...)

Fedora seems well featured if you're into Java development.

If what you're talking about is C and/or C++ development, I think any distro will do just fine: GCC is present on all the distros I can think of that aren't meant for embedded systems. The same is true of all the major libraries. Now if you want fancy IDE and things like that, I'm quite sure any "desktop" distro will do (that is, don't pick server-oriented or embedded distros).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
What is your favorite linux distro?


Also Debian GNU/Linux

Quote:
What kernel is it based off of?


I'm running Etch mostly, so that's 2.6.18

Quote:
What do you use your distro for?


Everything. From home desktop to work laptop and lots of servers (real and virtual).

Quote:
Which linux distro do you use to program C/C++ programs?


None. I program C, PHP and Python :-)

Quote:
Which distro provides the most development tools?


I have no idea, but Debian is probably one of the finalists, since they have more packages than any other distro.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'll have to say slackware, even though I'm not a real linux user. The reason is that I find it fairly easy to setup and use, while not limited. Gentoo is cool, but a bit too hardcore for me (I would recommend it only to people with experience). Fedora core is really nice and easy to setup and use, however, I felt somewhat limited in it. One of the things I didn't like about it was that it did not let me boot without starting X (which was a problem, since I was trying to install some driver requiring X to be off). I'm sure this is easy to fix though (as I said, I'm not a Linux user, I just wanted to try Linux some). I was going to try Debian on a virtual machine, but for some reason, the installation program lagged so much I just gave up after few attempts (took up to 10 seconds to scroll a line in the installation gui, no idea why). I also tried Ubuntu, but it didn't come with KDE, which I prefer over Gnome (these days there's a project called Kubuntu though, which is Ubuntu with KDE instead of Gnome). Other than that, I've heard tons of great things about it. I tried Mandrake (Mandriva nowdays), but it didn't work very well at all with my virtual enviroment afaik, and I think they charged money for disk 3 which contained KDE, and that was unacceptable to me back then.

Edit: Oh, and all of those came with C/C++ devtools, I think even the server versions did.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by caldiarWhat is your favorite linux distro?

Slackware

Quote:
What kernel is it based off of?

Slackware 12 comes with 2.6.21.5, the first slack release based on a 2.6 series (2.6 kernel headers etc.) Slack 11 and below come with 2.4.33.3 (2.4 kernel headers) stock. But I, like many, just compile my own 2.6 kernel anyways.

Quote:
What do you use your distro for?

Apache/MySql/DNS/DHCP/MythTv/NFS/SAMBA/Asterisk
Web browsing, compiling, and developemnt.

Quote:
Which linux distro do you use to program C/C++ programs?

Slackware

Quote:
Which distro provides the most development tools?

As far as tools for compiling, any distro will come with what you need. For IDE's then it may vary. Anything KDE based will come with kDevelop. Dunno about others.

--Zims

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by caldiarWhat is your favorite linux distro?

Xandros. My favorite distro is the one that pays me twice a month. They pay me to write free software. It matches the beard and ponytail and the fact that I live in a log cabin in the back woods.

Your mileage may vary.

Prior to Xandros, I was a diehard Slackware fan. It's like driving a stick shift. I could install Slackware 2.0 on a 33 MHz 386SX with 4 MB of RAM and a 40 MB hard drive and have no problem running it as a useful LAN gateway.
Quote:
What kernel is it based off of?

2.6.18
Quote:
What do you use your distro for?

Software development.
Quote:
Which linux distro do you use to program C/C++ programs?

Xandros, mostly, but some RHEL4 and RHEL5. Choice of development platform is not under my control, but really they're all alike. Slap on vim and the GNU dev tools and you can't tell the difference beween any Linux, Solaris, Mac OS X, or Windows.
Quote:
Which distro provides the most development tools?

You can get any tool for any distro.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm really enjoying Sabayon so far. Pretty much everything on my laptop just worked right after install.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by caldiar
What is your favorite linux distro?


Gentoo, at least on reasonably powerful boxes (because of the compile time). Though I have not really used any other distributions that much. I have Ubuntu on my laptop, but I do not really use it that much as I prefer having a comfortable, stationary computer setup (which I find harder to accomplish with my laptop), and Debian on my server. But so far, I am more comfortable in Gentoo, with, for example, its package manager, which I like more than APT and other package managers I have used (do not ask me for any specific reasons for this).


Quote:
Original post by caldiar
What kernel is it based off of?


You can choose between stable and unstable packets for everything you install. The latest stable vanilla kernel at the moment is 2.6.21.6, and unstable 2.6.22.1, but it also has various patched kernels (like -ck).

Quote:
Original post by caldiar
What do you use your distro for?


Everything I use a computer for. Music, movies, programming, browsing, chatting, etc.

Quote:
Original post by caldiar
Which linux distro do you use to program C/C++ programs?


The distro I have at hand, which usually is Gentoo.

Quote:
Original post by caldiar
Which distro provides the most development tools?


I would guess most large ones have about the same tools available via their package managers, and if they do not have a specific program, one can always get it from outside.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For my server:
Distribution: Debian GNU/Linux (Etch on the server).
Kernel: Linux 2.4.29.
Purpose: Web, mail, and file server.

For my desktop:
Distribution for C/C++ development: Ubuntu Feisty (based on Debian, so I feel right at home).

As far as development tools, virtually any distribution with a package manager should provide everything you would ever need.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use Fedora 7 for all my Linux needs, its on Kernel 2.6.21 at the moment.

I have used Debian and Gentoo before, I've considered switching to Gentoo, but I am just too lazy to wait for it to compile the stuff I need, plus, I already have Fedora the way I like, don't want to start over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
What is your favorite linux distro?

I started off with Slackware but moved to Debian about a year later. I primarily use Debian for most stuff but also have Gentoo and FreeBSD boxes.

Quote:
What kernel is it based off of?

I'm currently on Debian Etch so it's 2.6.18 IIRC.

Quote:
What do you use your distro for?

Web server, file server and home security monitoring. Also about to embark on some PIC microprocessor stuff soon.

Quote:
Which linux distro do you use to program C/C++ programs?

Don't really use Linux to do C or C++ . When I do have to do some (usually hacking something to make it work) it's Debian.

Quote:
Which distro provides the most development tools?

No idea about other distros but Debian has an impressive amount of packages.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thanks for the replies so far guys.
It appears, based on this forum and other forums I have posted this same survey on, that Debian and Slackware are at the top of the list in popularity.

When I buy my new SATA drives for my windows machine I'm going to dual-boot Slackware and Debian on this old harddrive to experiment with.

Again, thanks for the feedback.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by caldiarWhen I buy my new SATA drives for my windows machine I'm going to dual-boot Slackware and Debian on this old harddrive to experiment with.


Dual booting is so old school.

The best thing to do is to pack as much memory as you can into your Windows machine (at least 1 Gig, preferrably 2) and install your evaluation Linuxes into VMWare virtual machines. VMWare is free, and it allows you to do side-by-side comparisons while still picking up your email (or IM) in Windows. You can snapshot your vm so of you screw up an install you can revert.

--smw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by caldiar
thanks for the replies so far guys.
It appears, based on this forum and other forums I have posted this same survey on, that Debian and Slackware are at the top of the list in popularity.


Neither of them are as popular as Ubuntu. It is by far the most popular Linux desktop. Slackware was the most popular at one point in time, but it's been a decade since that was the case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Neither of them are as popular as Ubuntu.


That depends on what you look at. In this case the OP is asking software/game developers, not Linux users in general. Most Linux-using developers I know like Ubuntu, but don't run it as their main desktop or development environment for various reasons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I like Kubuntu, which is Ubuntu + KDE. KDE is very nice, although it doesn't seem to like Beryl very much. I'd suggest avoding Beryl on a KDE system, but it could be that I just had bad luck. Either way, make sure you get updates regularly and learn the basic Linux commands before you install it. In fact, I highly recommend that you print that page before you install it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
What is your favorite linux distro?

While I've futzed around with a number of distros (predominantly Ubuntu and Gentoo, some others as well), I find that Arch provides the best middle ground between ease of use and configurability. It has a very well maintained package repository (where you get all your pre-build programs from) that in my experience is much more up to date than other distros and optimized for newer processors. And if you want to go the Gentoo way and build all the software, that's easily automated too. Setup is a little more involved than Ubuntu though, since its installation leaves you with a very bare bones system (the way I like it) that you'll have to configure to taste.

If you're totally new to Linux, I'd probably recommend Ubuntu until you get your feet wet and understand the system to be able to manually configure things the way many other distros require.

Quote:
What kernel is it based off of?

Currently 2.6.21.

Quote:
What do you use your distro for?
Which linux distro do you use to program C/C++ programs?

It's the only unemulated OS installed on my system.

Quote:
Which distro provides the most development tools?

All development tools are be build on all major distros. That's the thing about most linux tools--if there isn't a package already made for your distro, just download the source and compile it yourself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by caldiar
What is your favorite linux distro?

Gentoo.
Quote:

What kernel is it based off of?

Uh... Linux.

I'm using version 2.6.20 with Gentoo-specific tweaks but, much like any distro, Gentoo has a bunch of different kernels for different purposes.
Quote:

What do you use your distro for?

Everything I use a computer for. Playing games, web browsing, email, watching movies, playing music, programming, drawing...
Quote:

Which linux distro do you use to program C/C++ programs?

Gentoo.
Quote:

Which distro provides the most development tools?

I suppose this depends what a development tool is, but possibly Debian, since (I think) it has the most packages. The other contender is probably Gentoo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use Ubuntu Feisty (7.04), though I haven't gotten around to using it very often, since I'm mainly used to Windows.
I haven't done much with it yet, since I haven't found a comfortable IDE for myself (I'd be using Code::Blocks, but for some reason Scintilla is really slow on Ubuntu/Debian/Linux). Also, nVidia and Ubuntu (or maybe just Linux for that matter) don't cooperate enough, at least not with the two graphics cards I've had. The only main problem was and still is that it's limiting my resolution to 1024x768, whereas my monitor/gfx card is capable of more.

I would suggest that before you jump straight into Linux that you try and verse yourself with bash. I had done so by installing cygwin, because I hated the Windows shell, and I had needed it to run Poderosa, a nice, compact Terminal application for Windows. This is a more practical solution for computers that can't handle OS emulators (my new one can, but the old one I had before was kind of low-end).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by deadimp
I use Ubuntu Feisty (7.04), though I haven't gotten around to using it very often, since I'm mainly used to Windows.
I haven't done much with it yet, since I haven't found a comfortable IDE for myself (I'd be using Code::Blocks, but for some reason Scintilla is really slow on Ubuntu/Debian/Linux). Also, nVidia and Ubuntu (or maybe just Linux for that matter) don't cooperate enough, at least not with the two graphics cards I've had. The only main problem was and still is that it's limiting my resolution to 1024x768, whereas my monitor/gfx card is capable of more.

I would suggest that before you jump straight into Linux that you try and verse yourself with bash. I had done so by installing cygwin, because I hated the Windows shell, and I had needed it to run Poderosa, a nice, compact Terminal application for Windows. This is a more practical solution for computers that can't handle OS emulators (my new one can, but the old one I had before was kind of low-end).

What card do you have? What does your xorg.conf file look like? I have GeForce 8800 GTX and I use the nVidia 9755 driver. I went through a lot to get it to work, but now I know the install procedure well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this