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please critique my redone webpage

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I don't know much about good website design, but here's a few things I noticed:

-first, this is small, but, to me, "go to my writing page instead" sounds like the user ended up at the wrong site and they need to click there to go to the correct place or something. To make it sound like an optional link, you could make it less commanding.

-you forgot a comma between "duplicating a line" and "changing the color" in the red paragraph

- I really like the first blue fish guy in the anthro section

-I also like the last creature in the watercolor section a lot

-However, the grid layouts of your work aren't very aesthetically pleasing themselves and don't show off your work as well as they could. For example, the rows are all different heights, and you can't always see the artwork inside each box very well. What a lot of artists do on pages I've seen is to just show a detail from their piece. Then you could make the boxes and rows all the same or similar size, with a glimpse of the artwork inside (if it's too big or detailed to show it all- I'm mainly thinking of the character portraits, which are too tall and skinny to see anything). The simple grid with plain text seems like it too could be more stylized, but that's not as big a deal (for example, not having the lines, or making the category text bigger or purtier or something, I dunno).

Hope that was helpful. Impressive site overall. I need to get me one a those.

~Waru

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Just a few comments about the aesthetics. I didn't read the print.

* All black background is so 1996 geocities-ish.
* Red text on black background is nauseating
* Purple text on black background is hard to read
* I have to scroll to the right to see all your thumbnails
* Everything is on one page
* No navigation menu
* Large font is not appealing
* Large serif font is less appealing

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We used to have a term for geocities pages like this in the mid 90s.

We called them center scroll fests.

IMO you need a nav bar, multiple pages, and a better color scheme.

Nice art on the page though :)

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Original post by smr
* I have to scroll to the right to see all your thumbnails


That definitely shouldn't happen. Can I ask what your screen resolution is? It should work fine on screens with horiz 1024 or greater, and hopefully nobody should be using less than that these days.


I would like to point out that the previous version had a plain white background, all black text, no graphical dividers, and no tables. So personally I consider this to be progress. ;) I will certainly give serious consideration to all suggestions made for improving the page, but my my main goals are something that is low maintenance, has everything up front rather than hidden in subpages where a prospective customer might miss it, and functions as a catalog showing a potential customer all the option they can order from, without seeming crassly commercial.


I changed the link text to: (Link To My Writing And Editing Services Page) Is that better or does that make it seem like I want people to link to me from their pages? I fixed the comma. Anyone have suggestions for alternate colors rather than just not liking these? I am not going to be using a wallpaper, so if you make a recommendation for the background please suggest a solid color. I don't understand what's not attractive about a large font? (I personally have trouble reading small fonts because of my astigmatism.) The font type is just the default html font because I'm not using a stylesheet. I'll look into what other sorts of fonts are available but if I have to specify the font on every line that's too much work.

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The problem I see is not the content matter, but the site. Unfortunately, it's a blast from the past in that it's very mid 90s in layout and design. It needs structure, organization, and better compliments to an artists/writers site. Since you're hosting it with Comcast, I don't know what resources you have access to (scripting languages and database technologies), so I am unable to recommend anything in regards to web design and development. At the very least, everything could be hard coded HTML, which is fine as long as you're not looking to have dynamic content (like displaying a random spotlight image, having comments added to each image, etc.). There are certain workarounds, but I don't know what you have access to.

Also, having everything on one page causes severe long load times, a big detractor to site visitors and perspective clients.

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Well, it doesn't look professionaly designed. Other than that, it's ok. Probably you don't care about it looking like that, but if you do, browse other sites and steal their html source.

goodluck!

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Original post by sunandshadow
has everything up front rather than hidden in subpages where a prospective customer might miss it


It's not all up front. It's hidden by pages of scrolling. People expect to have to click links to view more content. That's the way websites have worked for well over a decade. As far as the look is concerned, I wouldn't expect to get too many clients as an artist with a website that looks like that. There is nothing artistic about it.

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If you wanted to read why it is a bad design and what you could do to improve the design and implementation then you won't go wrong reading webstyleguide. Personally I see the uses of HCI influenced design but it is the most boring subject known to mankind.

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Original post by Mathachew
Since you're hosting it with Comcast, I don't know what resources you have access to (scripting languages and database technologies), so I am unable to recommend anything in regards to web design and development. At the very least, everything could be hard coded HTML, which is fine as long as you're not looking to have dynamic content (like displaying a random spotlight image, having comments added to each image, etc.). There are certain workarounds, but I don't know what you have access to.


Yes I'm pretty much limited to html, and no I have no need for dynamic content.

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Quote:
Original post by sunandshadow
Quote:
Original post by smr
* I have to scroll to the right to see all your thumbnails


That definitely shouldn't happen. Can I ask what your screen resolution is? It should work fine on screens with horiz 1024 or greater, and hopefully nobody should be using less than that these days.


I would like to point out that the previous version had a plain white background, all black text, no graphical dividers, and no tables. So personally I consider this to be progress. ;) I will certainly give serious consideration to all suggestions made for improving the page, but my my main goals are something that is low maintenance, has everything up front rather than hidden in subpages where a prospective customer might miss it, and functions as a catalog showing a potential customer all the option they can order from, without seeming crassly commercial.


I changed the link text to: (Link To My Writing And Editing Services Page) Is that better or does that make it seem like I want people to link to me from their pages? I fixed the comma. Anyone have suggestions for alternate colors rather than just not liking these? I am not going to be using a wallpaper, so if you make a recommendation for the background please suggest a solid color. I don't understand what's not attractive about a large font? (I personally have trouble reading small fonts because of my astigmatism.) The font type is just the default html font because I'm not using a stylesheet. I'll look into what other sorts of fonts are available but if I have to specify the font on every line that's too much work.


Maybe just [My Writing and Editing Services Page is Here]

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I changed the link text to that, and played around with the colors (using the whole 20 that html has names for lol) trying to make them harmonize with the graphical dividers - I like the colorscheme a lot better now. :)

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Ok, I'm going to give some advices that won't require you to redo the whole thing, however, it would be valuable for you to make the effort to learn CSS since it's pretty easy and saves loads of time in the long run.

1- there's more than 20 names for colors in html, but need not limit yourself to names, pull out photoshop or you image editing software, choose pretty colors and check up their hex number (#ff44aa for exemple) if you want to keep a dark bg I would try something desaturated that won't steal the show from your images.

2- if you absolutely much use a table, the least you can do is the hide the borders, they are very distracting.

3- use smaller thumbnails, big enough to recognize the images but small enough that the user isn't scrolling through miles of stuff before finding what he's searching for. Crop them all to the same size, the user will see them complete when he clicks to enlarge.

4- drop at least one of the big tribal designs at the top, they take space that should be used to display your work.

5- no emoticons on your professional website please.

6- only show your absolute best work.

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This could just be me, but the aliasing on the prettydividertop and prettydividerbottom is really distracting. Also, the inside the table cells, the borders around the images detract from the images themselves. Layout-wise a side bar or at least a quick jump link menu would be helpful.

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I posted this to your previous thread; clearly you didn't read it.

Excepts:
Quote:
Don't take the trouble to get a domain name. Art directors will remember "mac.com/users/~joeblow/web/portfolio/intro.html" much more easily than "joeblowillustration.com" when they go to hire their next artist. Plus "tripod.com/members/~janedoe/paintings/gallery/thumbnails.html" is so easy to mention in conversation or recommend to someone else, and it looks great on a business card. Don't consider the fact that domain names can cost less than $10 a year, and are often free with real web hosting accounts. Hey, the good ones are all taken or squatted on, right, so why bother? And if you do get a domain name, longer names that are more closely associated with your name or studio, and might be easier to remember, can't possibly be a cool as bizarre, clever, short ones that have nothing to do with you or your work.

...

Don't bother to find out how to make your site search-engine friendly.

...

Don't learn anything about usability, information design or good navigation practices. If you're making your site yourself, you don't want to stifle your creativity with such things, nor do you want to be aware of them if you've hired a "creative" web site designer or agency who has promised to make your site "cutting edge". All that nonsense about making a site easy to use just gets in the way. Make sure you don't read books on web site usability, like Steve Krug's Don't make Me Think. Don't try to look at your site like someone who's never been there before. Hey, you know where everything is, if some newbies can't figure it out, screw 'em!

...

Don't focus! ... Oh, and while you're at it, make sure to cram as much as possible on your home page. It's the most important page, right? So everything should go there. Make it long and scrolling and squeeze stuff into every corner. You don't want any wasted white space! The more stuff vying for attention, the better! MAKE EVERY LINE A HEADLINE! Mix colors! MAKE YOUR HEADLINES LOOK LIKE LINKS! MAKE YOUR LINKS LOOK LIKE HEADLINES! Be sure to underline, italicize and bold all kinds of stuff for EMPHASIS!!. Isn't this fun?! Don't forget, the computer gods gave you a milliOn fOntS for a reason; it would be a sin not to use them.

Your site is an aesthetic disaster, Mare.

  1. Layout/Color. Dark text on dark background is a no-no. I know; you wanted to create something atmospheric, in keeping with your own stylistic preferences. That does not excuse violating basic usability. Further, once you're selling your services, your preferences become secondary. Your customers rule.

  2. Layout. You waste the most important portion of your page - the first screenful - with content that doesn't wow, interest or appeal. Take a look at ConceptArt.org. Take a look at CGSociety.org. Take a look at Drawn!. Take a look at Cold Hard Flash. Sites that are serious about showing off artwork start by showing off artwork! Put your content as high up on the page as possible.

  3. Layout. People don't want to scroll indefinitely. It's excused for blogs because they are serial content, and the presumption is that you'll only read up to the last entry you'd seen (or subscribe to RSS and thus see each entry separately). Paginate your content.

  4. Layout/Pagination. Separate pages for each of your content categories - and you already have categories - is a good idea. For one thing, it allows people to focus on what they are interested in without having to sift through what they're not. For another, it allows your presentation of each item to be the focal point of the page, rather than having all your work compete. I really recommend something like ConceptArt.org's galleries: on the main page, one icon represents a category (remember to add alt tags, so search engines can find your content), with the name of the category below, clearly legible even without mouse hover (text that appears and disappears is a navigation hurdle); the category gallery presents thumbnails of all available pieces, and clicking on each thumbnail shows the work in full - with "previous" and "next" links to keep going through the gallery and links back up to the main page.

  5. Editorial Selection. Show your best work only. Nobody wants to sift through your earlier, weaker work. Select your strongest pieces to make the best impression and give you the best chance of winning commissions.


All that said, I must absolutely congratulate you for putting something up. Some people, myself included, talk and talk about what they're "going to" do, but don't get around to actually doing. I think it was Steve Jobs that said, real artists produce. Congratulations. You're a real artist.

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Olusey - Again I find myself put on the defensive by your rather abrasive communication style...

Actually I did read that link when you posted it, it was even posted twice in that thread. I thought it was mostly BS. My site is not intended to be found from search engines, and it doesn't generate enough income to justify paying for a domain name when my webservice provider already gives me a free one which is relatively short and for which I got to pick my directory name. This is only the second time I've made a webpage, the last time _was_ in the 90s, and I am copying the html I need out of a text book one line at a time. I'm all for making improvements to the page which can be done without too much effort or knowledge, but lacking both tools and experience I don't expect to end up with something really professional looking.

I did try to have good "usability, information design and navigation practices" - I made the webpage the way I like to read webpages, which is having everything in one place in linear order, so I can skim it with one scrolling glance and decide whether it's worth actually looking closely at. From everyone's comments I can see that's obviously not the prevailing philosophy, but I can only wonder how other people don't get confused by having too many options and non-obvious site structure. And I seem to be the only one who thinks the table lines were an improvement on the previous lineless design. That at least I'm going to experiment with - see if I can kill the image borders or change the color of the borders or anything.

Now, the point of only showing my best work is an interesting one. I wanted to show the array of content types and techniques I sell, but IMO some of these are categorically mediocre, like flat coloring and my attempts at drawing architecture. Some of them I simply dislike doing, like soft shading. But I think removing all the examples of these 3 things would be less productive than leaving them there for prospective clients to decide what they like. So, if anyone thinks a particular piece is bad I can try to replace it with a different example of the same content type or technique, but when I picked these pieces I did spend a good bit of time agonizing over which were the best examples of each category. I made the birch tree sprite new, re-cropped or adjusted the contrast on several images, smoothed some lines of the roosterlizard, and re-exported the running animation because it wasn't scaling cleanly to thumbnail-size. I basically ransacked my harddrive for all the art I had ever done, so whatever quality the stuff that's on the page is, is probably the best I had on hand. There's also the fact that my favorites among my art are often not the same as other people's favorites - I really have no ideas which pieces would be considered the best by the average viewer.

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Bassically, the page matches the content and thats a good thing. If you feel the above posters communication style abrasive your being far to defensive. He posted the link in the original thread, if you read through it you will know you bassically ignored everything in it, it was a good link as well, I liked it.

But then again, no one can blame you for not designing a good web-page right, you dont know coding and your not a useability expert. Use some business sense though, you have to spend money to make money. Get someone to design a page for you, someone with a bit of experience, hopefully they will be able showcase your work in a better light, because your woefully off-center with this attempt, not that thats bad; the site is amaturish, and your an amature at web design, go figure.

Other then that, and I know what you will say but I feel the need for some reason, your work is not worth giving away. You've ventured into the realm of art without ability and, as long as I have seen you posting on these forums, no apparent sense or capability to take criticism or advice. Normally I wouldn't be so harsh when it comes to art, afterall, most of the best artists werent any good when they started and/or their poor work was the early stages of the newest fads and styles that other would mimic for years afterwords. Yet you continue your attempts to copy anime in a completely amaturish manner, again with no reguard for those suggesting a more formal foundation, youve even argued with seasoned industry veteran while taking their class about your self proclaimed abilities. Not that I expect you to take my advice.

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I have to agree with all the points that Oluseyi made. Especially about the colour scheme; I literally cannot read the whole of one of those large dark magenta blocks of text as my eyes can't take it.

Overall though, I guess my main criticism (apart from the colour scheme) is that it just doesn't look that professional. In fact it reminds me of some of the websites I saw when teaching middle school IT classes, although by no means the worst out of those I've seen (decorative frilly pink fonts on hot pink backgrounds, ugh). But it just doesn't look up to what I'd expect from someone looking to be hired for contract work. I do recommend you follow Oluseyi's suggestions and split everything up in separate pages and make it a bit more navigatable. It doesn't need to be that fancy a website, just clean and usable.

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Alright, I give up. If the consensus is that the site is a piece of crap and needs to be redesigned, I'll redesign it. I'm pissed off that I apparently wasted a week working on it, and was prematurely really happy that I was finally done with the stupid thing, but oh well. Maybe in another week I'll have a new version.

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Sorry but I have to agree with the above, the main problems for me were the fact that there is just too much content for one page, you could easily split it up and have a nav bar. Also the logo at the top is too big and as stated above the link to your writing page makes it seem as if I've gone to the wrong url. Also you use too many font colours for no real reason.
I'd suggest looking at some other sites that are related to yours and see how they have designed there sites, you'll probably notice they are much more user friendly.
IMO a site doesn't need to be fancy to look good, a good simple layout split into separate pages will make your site look much better and more professional (especially since your essentially trying to sell a service on the page).

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Quote:
Original post by sunandshadow
This is only the second time I've made a webpage, the last time _was_ in the 90s, and I am copying the html I need out of a text book one line at a time. I'm all for making improvements to the page which can be done without too much effort or knowledge, but lacking both tools and experience I don't expect to end up with something really professional looking.

Why not just use a WYSIWYG editor? Its incredibly easy, and nearly all free hosting providers that are somewhat well known have one available online. No code, just drag and drop. An experienced coder may find it limiting, but someone with no experience will put out a much better page.

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Original post by sunandshadow
Alright, I give up. If the consensus is that the site is a piece of crap and needs to be redesigned, I'll redesign it. I'm pissed off that I apparently wasted a week working on it, and was prematurely really happy that I was finally done with the stupid thing, but oh well. Maybe in another week I'll have a new version.


STOP!

Use a WYSIWYG app for this. Hell, some of them are even free now. (Serif are offering this for nada. I've no idea if it's any good -- I use a Mac these days and iWeb is more than adequate for my placeholder site. For more advanced sites, I throw Dreamweaver at the problem.)


Now. Content...

Look at your art objectively. Be ruthless and remove anything you're not entirely happy about showing in public. Be positively *evil* about this, and brutally honest with yourself.

I don't personally think all your art is bad, but you do need to nail down your visual 'voice'. Find what you're best at and stick to it rather than trying umpteen different styles. Don't be mediocre at lots of different fields when you can be great at just one. One is all you need.

Also, don't your writing shouldn't play second fiddle to your images: Get rid of the 18-rated graphics there! It's a writing page. It should have writing. Period.

If I'm interested in hiring you as a writer, the *last* thing I expect to see when I open your writing page is a bloody great illustration of copulation. Put the art somewhere else. (Especially the graphic novel stuff. A graphic novel scriptwriter writes *scripts*. The art belongs in the art section. You can link to the relevant section from the script if you wish -- that's what hyperlinks were invented for -- but do not include it with the script if it's not safe for work. Your potential clients will most likely be *at* work when viewing your portfolio.)


Now for the design...

You've got the "Oooh! Colours! Let's have lots of pretty colours! And fonts! Must have fonts!" stuff out of your system. Excellent. (If it's any consolation, *everyone* goes through that phase. Graphic design and interaction design are both things you have to learn the hard way, just like any other craft.)

So now that's done with, you can approach the site with a more objective, more experienced, eye.

Consider how potential visitors will view your site and what *their* needs may be. Put the customer first, not your own convenience, or people will move on to the next site instead.

Try seeing your website as an opportunity, not a chore. Use your own art skills to create a gallery for your art. A gallery has a foyer which tells you what's what and where the interesting stuff is. (You're a writer as well as an artist, so you could put a couple of showcases for *both* here. But be subtle. A single, well-written slogan or phrase will be far more effective than paragraphs of text.)

One approach is to think of this as a magazine's front page. A collage of some of your art may be an idea here, or you could go for a more minimalist approach instead using icons, or possibly images based on one of your characters.


The dividers which frame your site's title and writing link are good candidates to use as a basis for the site's look. This is often true of most abstract 'architectural' images as so much graphic design is architectural anyway. Such designs are ideal for navbars and other GUI "furniture". (The "Space Wrought Iron Railing" image also has potential.) The advantage of such images is that they can complement the heavily figurative art. Think of the interface as the frame around your art. Without that frame, it's just a bit of paper of canvas; with it, it becomes something you want to hang on a wall.

Navigation controls should be viewed in the videogame sense: part of a consistent user interface that your visitors can grasp instantly. Keep it simple. Keep it clean. Keep it intuitive.

And keep it resolution-independent as far as possible. Not everyone has perfect eyesight or a modern PC. Some people -- myself included -- have the zoom settings turned up a notch on their browsers to make the text easier on failing eyes. (It's also worth considering that laptop displays often have a higher DPI than their desktop counterparts. Even a site that requires 1024 pixels in width can look ridiculously small on such screens.)

Your website is your shop front. The window potential visitors peer through to decide whether they want to come in. Tantalise them. Tempt them. Make them want to find out more.

Now, granted, I've spent most of the last 10 years doing this stuff and, occasionally, even getting paid for it. There's a lot more to website design than the above, but hopefully my comments, coupled with those linked to by Oluseyi -- please don't make the mistake of assuming graphic design rules can be trivially broken; most of them are directly related to basic cognitive science's discoveries -- can help you avoid the most common pitfalls.

Imagine someone else has asked you to build them a gallery website. Treat this as a paying gig. After all, the idea is that people will come up and pay you money for your work.

*

One more thing: Oluseyi is right about having your own domain. It makes a lot of difference to peoples' perception of the site, but wouldn't cost you more than a couple of dollars a month at most and you'll get a lot more flexibility with it. "Sunandshadow.com" appears to have been taken, but "marekuntz.com" or, preferably, "wickedelight.com" both appear to be available.

These will usually include email accounts too, so you could have "mare@wickeddelight.com". Having control over the email address is a big plus and also a major advantage when dealing with clients professionally. (It's also less painful if you should decide to change provider later on as you just take your domain with you to the new host. I like to keep a Googlemail account too, as backup, but I never use the email address given me by my ISP as these change whenever I change my ISP.)

Hosting your own domain is ridiculously cheap. I can get hosting here in Rip-off Britain, including a .COM domain name, for about £20 or so per *year*. (By comparison, I pay around £30 *per month* for my mobile phone contract.)

(I'd buy both choices as they won't cost much anyway. The biggest problem with domains derived from your actual name is that email addresses generally look either egotistical, weird, or both. Point it at the "wickeddelight.com" domain instead. This way you'll save on hosting too.)

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I didn't use a wysiwyg page maker because my roommate hates them and refused to help me if I used one lol. Also because I did that last time I tried to make a pretty webpage, and I didn't learn anything from doing it that way - looking at the code it generated I couldn't understand it at all. I do have one I can attempt to use though.

Quote:
Look at your art objectively. Be ruthless and remove anything you're not entirely happy about showing in public. Be positively *evil* about this, and brutally honest with yourself.

I don't personally think all your art is bad, but you do need to nail down your visual 'voice'. Find what you're best at and stick to it rather than trying umpteen different styles. Don't be mediocre at lots of different fields when you can be great at just one. One is all you need.


From previous experience I've found that my favorites among my own art are not the same as other people's favorites, so I don't think I'm capable or judging my own art objectively. Which really makes sense because when I look at my stuff I see the intentions behind it, which other people don't, and I just don't have the same taste in art as the majority of people anyway. All the pieces I chose, I'm happy with _for what they are_, and when we're talking about concept sketches and blueprints they're kind of inherently homely because they're not finished art, they're diagrams. Showing finished art for that sort of thing wouldn't work because it's not what I'm selling.

I think it's interesting that you think I should concentrate on one visual voice. I do have a style I regard as mine, but that's never what people want to buy. I also philosophically think it's better to be a jack of all trades than a master of one. What I'd really like to do is be the main artist for an RPG or MMORPG, and that takes the ability to do a ton of different stuff.

Thanks for the suggestions about using the graphical divider or space wrought iron railing as a theme, I'll think about those as I'm attempting to redesign the page. How exactly do I design a page with lots of graphics to be resolution-independent?

Writing page, it's under construction, I hadn't really decided to keep that pic there anyway. I might keep it if the 18+ writing ends up on its own page, but it definitely doesn't belong on a page with pg content. The storyboards however are a standard part of what a comics scriptwriter gives their artist, I have been repeatedly asked by artists to provide them with sickfigure storyboards along with my script. As horrible as they look I certainly wouldn't call them art lol.

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Quote:
Original post by sunandshadow
I didn't use a wysiwyg page maker because my roommate hates them and refused to help me if I used one lol.


Only fools and masochists deliberately go out of their way to make their life harder.

Quote:
Also because I did that last time I tried to make a pretty webpage, and I didn't learn anything from doing it that way - looking at the code it generated I couldn't understand it at all. I do have one I can attempt to use though.


You don't have to understand how a thermos flask knows how to keep hot drinks hot and cold drinks cold in order to use one. It's a tool. Stop treating it like magic and just use it for what it is. After all, you don't regularly open up Microsoft Word's .DOC files in a hex editor to understand how to hand-code such files yourself, right? Who *cares* how or why it works! Let others worry about that stuff. Your task is to *get the job done*. That is all that matters in this industry.

Quote:

I think it's interesting that you think I should concentrate on one visual voice. I do have a style I regard as mine, but that's never what people want to buy. I also philosophically think it's better to be a jack of all trades than a master of one. What I'd really like to do is be the main artist for an RPG or MMORPG, and that takes the ability to do a ton of different stuff.


The main artist for an RPG -- or any major game project -- doesn't do "a ton of different stuff". If you're working as a lead artist, the trick is to *get other people* to do all that different stuff. *Your* job is to keep the vision whole; to make sure they all stick to the same consistent artistic style. Nowhere is it graven in stone that that style has to be *your* style.

Management isn't about being able to do every last little thing on your own -- trust me, I've done that and it was difficult enough back in the 16-bit days! -- but about being able to know how to get your colleagues to do them for you.

A lead programmer spends most of his time merging code written by other people into the main project, ensuring it's of a good enough quality and also specifying what needs to be written. His actual coding time on any given project will often be _less_ than that of his colleagues. Quite a bit less in some cases.

A lead artist is no different. His job is to check the quality of the assets coming into the asset pipeline and ensuring they're rigged as specified, as well as fitting the designer's vision of how each asset should look. He may also be liaising with the other leads to prepare the next batch of tasks for his staff.

I suspect you're conflating the "Lead Artist" with a "Concept Artist". The latter is there to get the initial look and feel of the game sorted, yes, but in that case, you really need to work on your anatomy as most of your art simply isn't going to work in a 3D environment. (I have much the same problem, which is why I don't do game art much these days. I have a very rough, cartoony style that only really works in 2D. I'm actually better at architectural drawing and graphic design than realistic character work.)

If you're really dead set on getting work as a concept artist, you are going to have an uphill struggle unless you spend a good while nailing down the anatomy. As others have pointed out (albeit in less than diplomatic tones), your art is too informal and abstract in style. In all fairness, we're overdue a shift away from photorealism, but realistically most of the demand out there for mainstream console projects is going to be for artists capable of realist art styles rather than the more abstract forms.

That said, you could do worse than working on a casual game or three. There's a greater demand for non-photorealistic art style in the casual games sector. (Rather than focusing on photorealistic renderings, try reading up on character design and graphic styles for animation -- particularly books aimed at the Flash / Web animation side. I suspect you'll feel more comfortable working at this end of the stylistic spectrum.)

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Thanks for the suggestions about using the graphical divider or space wrought iron railing as a theme, I'll think about those as I'm attempting to redesign the page. How exactly do I design a page with lots of graphics to be resolution-independent?


Resolution-independence in this case just means ensuring your page looks decent at resolutions from 640 x 480 upwards. Don't set an arbitrarily lower limit to screen size if you can avoid it, that's the key.

Tricks include using a mostly text-based layout and only using graphics to highlight and frame rather than larding the page with whopping great GIFs and PNGs. Wherever possible, use text. That's the real key. It keeps up the site's speed and also makes it much easier for people with accessibility issues. (Screen readers can't parse text in an image file, for example.)

Come to think of it, you could probably get away with using something like JAlbum to do most of the heavy lifting. All you would then need to do is build an entrance page to link to the JAlbum gallery (or galleries) and the writing page. Try and use a similar look and feel for both. JAlbum has a bunch of templates you can use, so that shouldn't be too difficult. Pick a simple, minimalist one as that'll make your life easier.


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The storyboards however are a standard part of what a comics scriptwriter gives their artist, I have been repeatedly asked by artists to provide them with sickfigure storyboards along with my script.


I hate to say this, but I think your artist just can't work out what you want from your script. Like animation scripts, comic scripts need to include seriously anal direction detail and even instructions on framing, such as:

Quote:

PANEL 3: TWO-SHOT with EDGAR and JANE as they argue. JANE is on her feet, emoting and waving her hands about while she rants. EDGAR just sits there impassively. There is a table in the foreground and JANE is standing behind it.

JANE:
So this is what you call 'reasonable', is it? What the hell did I do to deserve an asshole like you?

EDGAR:
Hey, you proposed to me, remember?


PANEL 4: FRAMELESS POV SHOT from EDGAR showing MCU of JANE ranting further. Her clenched fists slam down on the top of PANEL 6, below, which acts as the table in this shot. She's leaning forward, shouting into EDGAR's face and we're seeing this from EDGAR's perspective.


JANE: (the 'MAN' should be in really big type on its own line)
Why, you... you... MAN!



PANEL 5: Reverse-shot, ECU on EDGAR from JANE's POV as he drops his bombshell... he's grinning like the proverbial canary-swallowing cat and waving a wad of cash -- fifty-dollar bills! -- right in front of us.

EDGAR:
Aw now honey! I said I din't do it an' I din't! See? I tol' ya I ain't a bettin' man no more!

...



That said, storyboards can certainly be useful in getting the visuals clear in your own head. (I know a pro who does just that.) Whether I'd include it on the website is another matter however. If your artists insist on this, then by all means mention that you can provide one (and perhaps include a link to an example in your art gallery), but I wouldn't include it on the page with the script as it'll be a visually distracting image, taking away the impact from the text.

But that's just my humble opinion.

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