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dist0rted

DirectX Graphics 10 worth the hard/software required?

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I'm doing the best I can with Direct3D 9, but with the next generation being available, is it really worth it to even write games for it at this point? Really won't it be a good couple years or so at least before the small-enthusiast games should even worry about the update to 10? (For that matter, I really don't know much about the stuff implemented in version 10 at all, does it really fit the hype?)

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Well, since DX10 isn't and never will be available on anything less than Vista, you'll be eliminating a large part of your target audience by targetting only DX10.

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D3D10 is a million times nicer to develop with/for - it's a cleaner API, its got fixed-caps, its more efficient and of course it's cutting edge. As a developer I really enjoy working with D3D10.

That said, I have the advantage of playing with technologiy *I* want to and I don't have to worry about the target audience. In this case, it becomes much more questionable whether it's worth upgrading.

If target audience is of prime interest to you then stick with D3D9. There are relatively few "must have" things that you just cannot do under SM3+D3D9 that you could with D3D10.

Don't upgrade just because something bigger and shinier is available. Pull up the GameFest/GDC slides for the last couple of years - there's lots of nice bitesize chunks of information on D3D10. Read all that and decide whether it really adds more (features) than you lose (audience) and go from there...

hth
Jack

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Original post by jollyjeffers
D3D10 is a million times nicer to develop with/for - it's a cleaner API, its got fixed-caps, its more efficient and of course it's cutting edge. As a developer I really enjoy working with D3D10.

That said, I have the advantage of playing with technologiy *I* want to and I don't have to worry about the target audience. In this case, it becomes much more questionable whether it's worth upgrading.

If target audience is of prime interest to you then stick with D3D9. There are relatively few "must have" things that you just cannot do under SM3+D3D9 that you could with D3D10.

Don't upgrade just because something bigger and shinier is available. Pull up the GameFest/GDC slides for the last couple of years - there's lots of nice bitesize chunks of information on D3D10. Read all that and decide whether it really adds more (features) than you lose (audience) and go from there...

hth
Jack

I second the hell out of this. I love playing with Direct3D10, but I have the luxury of not really caring about an audience. My side-projects are my fun and whoever ends up being able to use/look/play them is not my concern. Direct3D10, while very syntactically different from D3D9, is an absolute dream to develop with.

But, not very people have migrated to Vista yet and, of those that did, even less have the hardware required to really enjoy some of the nicer things that Direct3D10 has to offer.

So, it's a matter of audience. And whether or not you're willing to update your personal machine.

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Wow, I should really look into it just to see what's up then. But either way, the goal of me making games would simply be for the experience to look good on a portfolio, so the only question I have now is is it worth the costs for Vista?

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Original post by dist0rted
for the experience to look good on a portfolio
Well if you're forward-looking then D3D10 might be a good option. A year or two from now, when you really want to make use of that portfolio the technology should have a greater install base and hence be more valuable to you.

Currently there are less D3D10 developers than D3D9, so showing you're experienced with a specialist technology that is becoming more mainstream would look better to me (if I were hiring) than yet-another-d3d9-programmer [smile]. But it's possible to argue that the complete opposite is more favourable [lol].

Ultimately, up to you - I recommend looking through the SDK (documentation + videos) and conference material. There's not much point upgrading to D3D10 if you've no interest in making use of the new features...


hth
Jack

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Original post by jollyjeffers
There's not much point upgrading to D3D10 if you've no interest in making use of the new features...

Yea, this is another good point. Many people speak of upgrading/rewriting their renderers to use D3D10, while I'm not so sure that they actually assess if they even need the new features that 10 offers hehe

Other than the book that Jack and I are a part of, I have no commercial involvement with it, although we are starting to look there for the future. Anyone in middleware rendering should surely consider it.

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