Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
Eniak19

Question about VSS

This topic is 3955 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

We use the VSS to prosses a project,but there is something unpleasure about the *.rc file,such as the BMP,we cant upload them to the server,thus we cant download to everyone's local PC,So,what should we do to handle this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Yeah Source Safe really dislikes binary files. I think this is just the first of many limitations you will find with Source Safe. My recommendation would be to not use Source Safe. Use Subversion instead, or if you have the money, get Perforce. I really can't think of a single reason why you would want to use Source Safe. Even if you could solve the problem you are having now, there are just more waiting for you down the road.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The one rule with Microsoft Visual SourceSafe is, STAY AWAY FROM IT. Really, get Subversion, Mercurial, Perforce, anything is better than VSS. Also it's not particularly good at keeping your source safe. The Lock-Modify-Unlock method of version control is extremely crap and annoying after using a Copy-Modify-Merge one.

Regards
elFarto

[Edited by - Shannon Barber on August 3, 2007 11:59:07 AM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
VSS does work for small projects (less than 2 gigs including history I think was the recommendation at one point). It should also handle binaries fine, though I haven't used it in 5 years and don't remember the details.

That said, Subversion and Perforce are significantly better. Definitely look at them. Alienbrain has a nice sales pitch but I've had mixed luck with them when it comes to stability/getting everything working nicely out of box.

How are people handling binary files in subversion with the Copy-Modify-Merge workflow? This seems slightly more risky for unmergeable files than the Perforce workflow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by BrianL
How are people handling binary files in subversion with the Copy-Modify-Merge workflow? This seems slightly more risky for unmergeable files than the Perforce workflow.


Since the merge is done client side, you can use any program todo it. By default binary files are not merged, but if you have a program that can merge them, that can be used (at least in Subversion and Mercurial, I haven't used Perforce).

Mercurial by itself cannot do any merging, it relies entirely on external programs todo it, generally that program is 'merge'/diff3. That's something to keep in mind when using Mercurial under Windows is that you will need to get a third-party merge application.

Regards
elFarto

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I really prefer the lock-checkin style like SourceSafe uses.

I worked on a project of ~1million lines which was about 10 years old and had been in VSS all that time, with no problems. There are known bugs but I consider it the best interface for any source control software.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have used VSS at 3 different companies, I have used CVS at 2, and Subversion at 2.

I strongly feel that subversion is the superior product of the 3 in all ways, for all cases. IF you have at least 1 person on the team who is familiar enough with it to do some of the more advanced setup / admin things, or someone willing to learn it and take on the responsibility of the customization (setting up hooks) and admin.

Subversion supports the idea of locking / watching (since Subversion 1.2) but it is not the most common use case for subversion, so isn't the one supported the most completely.

The ONLY trouble I've ever had with switching a VSS team to CVS or subversion was the mental shift in usage model from the lock-modify-unlock to the copy-modify-merge system ... especially when developers had only worked on small informal teams. It DOES take months to get comfortable with the adjustment to the CVS / SVN system but I can honestly say, only 2 developers I've known (out of 20+) didn't end up liking it better within a year. The rest completely abandoned the VSS lock system and have not locked back.

As for merging binaries ... the main situation is ... you just don't - if 1 artist edits an image while another artist has had the image modified, then when the second artist goes to check in their changes, he/she opens the original, the other persons version, and their own ... and proceeds however they wish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'v used both both subversion and VSS, and I really dislike VSS. If you have a choice use something else (I'v heard good things about perforce for big projects).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It should tell you something that Microsoft themselves do not actually use VSS for source-control.

Perforce >> all

VSS is the route to all evil (much like Visual Studio 6.0)

-me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Palidine
It should tell you something that Microsoft themselves do not actually use VSS for source-control.

Perforce >> all

VSS is the route to all evil (much like Visual Studio 6.0)

-me
Yes, but MS' projects are a bit bigger than everyone elses'. Imagine the size of the Vista source tree, worked on by thousands of people. VSS isn't designed for that I guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

Participate in the game development conversation and more when you create an account on GameDev.net!

Sign me up!