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Apollo

How was the original Zelda created anyway?

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What in the name of hell is assembly?

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"Apollo is the kind of guy who can...no, will create a video game in Visual Basic."

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Guest Anonymous Poster
hahahahaha

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I'll take it you don't know either Kid.

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"Apollo is the kind of guy who can...no, will create a video game in Visual Basic."

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Assembly is the native language of your computer. When you write crap in 'C' or whatever, it basically gets translated into xxxembly. To program in Assembly is to tell the processor exactly what to do. Here's a little example:

mov EAX, y_pos
imul screenY
add EAX, x_pos
shl EAX, 2
mov EDI, EAX
mov EAX, color
repnz STOSD

This doesn't really do much, but it just shows how it looks, I recommend reading xxxembly Language Step by Step
(Jeff Dunteman)

It's a good book, and learning Assembly really helps in certain situations
(if I can't do something in C++, I just use the inline Assembly...problem solved-I MAKE IT do what I want, heheh).

Oh yeah, it's super fast too.

*sorry if some of the words come up as "xxxembly", stupid NetNanny here at school automatically takes out the 'a-s-s'

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When life hands you lemons, throw them at God's head.

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So assembly (look I can write it, wheee!!) Is what, you said it was the computer's native language, but that's obviously not true because all computers run on a basis of the Binary system.

What is Assembly? My question isn't yet answered.

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"Apollo is the kind of guy who can...no, will create a video game in Visual Basic."

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Yes, binary is the native language of the computer, and so is assembly: assmebly codes are directly convertable to binary. A processor takes a binary code, say 10100101 and preforms an operation based on that code. Now an assembly command, JMP for example, is converted by the assembler (like a compiler for assembly, sort of) into a binary code.
So, (assembly codes) == (binary codes).

Why does net nanny think xxx is so much better than ass?

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- mallen22@concentric.net
- http://members.tripod.com/mxf_entertainment/

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Zenroth, what are you talking about...yes I know processors move and compute binary data, due to the fact that they are digital machines...but the assembly mneumonics/opcodes are embedded into the chip, and that IS assembly. The binary encoding is synonomous with the assembly opcode...example:

"0x89D8" means "mov AX, BX"
this is a 16-bit piece I just pulled from DEBUG...the instruction is encoded(packed) in a binary number sort of like this:

1000 1001 1101 1000
mov ax bx

this IS NOT accurate(so don't complain that I'm an idiot), it's just a sample showing that the binary digits are broken down to mean "do this" or "add these numbers".
Run DEBUG and try different but similar operations(e.g. "mov ax, bx" - "mov ax, cx")
You'll see that only part of the number representing the opcode changed to reflect your use of a different register.

Alternatively, you could download the Intel Architecture Guide from intel to see EXACTLY how the opcodes are broken down.

[This message has been edited by asmLOCK (edited November 18, 1999).]

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