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3fast3furious

Core 2 Duo 2.4Ghz temps?

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Ok, so I build my new computer the other day, specs: evga 680i MB, gskill 2gb ram, 8800 gts superclocked, core 2 duo e6600 (2.4 ghz), antec 900 case. Everything went smoothly until I entered the bios, went to system monitor and the temp reading was slowly climbing all the way up to 52c and then it stopped. So I figured I didnt install the stock heatsink correctly so I took it all apart, cleaned the grease off and put some arctic silver on, put it all back together and booted up and it leveled off at 50c in the system monitor in the bios. Is this ok? It seems kinda high... What programs can i use to monitor temps inside the OS? (vista), and should I stress test the computer? If so, with what programs? It seems like everywhere I read people are getting low temps with the intel stock hsf, am I doing something wrong? -will

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Original post by 3fast3furious
Ok, so I build my new computer the other day, specs: evga 680i MB, gskill 2gb ram, 8800 gts superclocked, core 2 duo e6600 (2.4 ghz), antec 900 case. Everything went smoothly until I entered the bios, went to system monitor and the temp reading was slowly climbing all the way up to 52c and then it stopped. So I figured I didnt install the stock heatsink correctly so I took it all apart, cleaned the grease off and put some arctic silver on, put it all back together and booted up and it leveled off at 50c in the system monitor in the bios. Is this ok? It seems kinda high... What programs can i use to monitor temps inside the OS? (vista), and should I stress test the computer? If so, with what programs? It seems like everywhere I read people are getting low temps with the intel stock hsf, am I doing something wrong?

-will


The paste has to settle in before you see any good temps with it. Also, did you apply the AS *exactly* as in their instructions (on their website)? Are you sure your heatsink is firmly positioned on the chip (and you know, actually makes contact with it)?

As for programs... Everest Home Edition works (get it from major geeks or something like that, it's not officially available any more)... does your mobo support nTune? That works the best (and seeing as it's a 680i, it "should").

Anyways, 50C seems *high* for a C2. Maybe the thing's heatspreader isn't making good contact with the core.

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You're heatsink's has to be off the processor. Make sure that your thermal paste is over all the processor, and that you're making contact with the heatsink completely. I always knew mine was tight with my processors because whenever I would pull the fan/heatsink off, the processor would come up with it. =X

My friend had the exact same problem, and he was using the stock fan. We checked it out, and sure enough, the piece of crap was halfway on. We found out that the stock fan clips that hold it down to the motherboard go loose after refitting it more than once, so we had to push them apart to keep it down on the processor.

IMO, the stock fan is useless...

For that very reason, when I got mine, I bought a custom heatsink (I've got a E6600 too). Blue Orb 2, and it works great. When I first turned my system on and let it sit for a while, the processor was 3 degrees colder than the motherboard (28 degrees Celsius!). With it overclocked to 4.5 Ghz, I'm at 36-38 degrees Celsius. I haven't had any problems with it, other than installing it into my small case. The heatsink is about 6.5" in diameter, that's why. The PSU I had bought was slightly larger, and therefore I had to push my fan against it slightly. Even my friend got a custom fan... =)

The Antec 900 is plenty large though, you wouldn't have any problems if you were to buy it. Another one might work better.

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Yes I am using nTune, and it is telling me my processor is around 39 - 40c idle, but in the bios system monitor it always says around 50c. What is the difference?

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Original post by 3fast3furious
Yes I am using nTune, and it is telling me my processor is around 39 - 40c idle, but in the bios system monitor it always says around 50c. What is the difference?


The BIOS, as simple as it seems, puts stress on the processor. It's not the same as idle.

Get Orthos (dual prime95) and run its torture test. Monitor your temps the WHOLE TIME. If they spike over 50C either:
a) Your chip is defective.
b) Your chip's heatspreader isn't making contact with the chip.
c) Your heatsink isn't making contact with your chip's heatspreader.
d) Your thermal paste isn't doing it's job (applied incorrectly).

A C2D should NOT be that hot.

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when my computer is just sitting there my gfx card will be at around 49 to 50c. Right when i get done playing half life 2, the card will be at about 57 - 58c. I am going to try the prime 95 tortue test.

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Also, I'm not sure on how much this affects the processor temperature, but if my processor is idling in the low 40s, how much should that rise if say my room temperature rises a few degrees? Or if it lowers a few degrees? Im not sure how hot is in there right now but it should be around 75-77 farenheit (25-26c?). I will run the torture test when i get home around 5:30 central time

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Considering the max temperatures are 60 degrees, you have still 10 degrees breathing space. Look at heat spreader if it's tightly connected, and warm. You might actually look at the voltage as well. BIOS readings are not that far from CPU running at full power. Of course while CPU is running quickly in BIOS, GFX is not.

It might be because your GFX card is warming up the system. IIRC ordinary 8800 has 150 W, yours is overclocked.

BTW I have 24 degrees when idle with common work (like music, writing, programming), 39 degrees under stress test.

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One mistake a lot of people make when applying heatsinks is to use TOO FRIGGIN' MUCH THERMAL PASTE, which greatly reduces heat transfer. If you used more than about a pinhead-sized amount, take the heatsink off, wipe all the thermal paste off the heatsink (but not off the CPU), and put it back on. Chances are you'll see a marked improvement.

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