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3fast3furious

Core 2 Duo 2.4Ghz temps?

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Ok, so I build my new computer the other day, specs: evga 680i MB, gskill 2gb ram, 8800 gts superclocked, core 2 duo e6600 (2.4 ghz), antec 900 case. Everything went smoothly until I entered the bios, went to system monitor and the temp reading was slowly climbing all the way up to 52c and then it stopped. So I figured I didnt install the stock heatsink correctly so I took it all apart, cleaned the grease off and put some arctic silver on, put it all back together and booted up and it leveled off at 50c in the system monitor in the bios. Is this ok? It seems kinda high... What programs can i use to monitor temps inside the OS? (vista), and should I stress test the computer? If so, with what programs? It seems like everywhere I read people are getting low temps with the intel stock hsf, am I doing something wrong? -will

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Original post by 3fast3furious
Ok, so I build my new computer the other day, specs: evga 680i MB, gskill 2gb ram, 8800 gts superclocked, core 2 duo e6600 (2.4 ghz), antec 900 case. Everything went smoothly until I entered the bios, went to system monitor and the temp reading was slowly climbing all the way up to 52c and then it stopped. So I figured I didnt install the stock heatsink correctly so I took it all apart, cleaned the grease off and put some arctic silver on, put it all back together and booted up and it leveled off at 50c in the system monitor in the bios. Is this ok? It seems kinda high... What programs can i use to monitor temps inside the OS? (vista), and should I stress test the computer? If so, with what programs? It seems like everywhere I read people are getting low temps with the intel stock hsf, am I doing something wrong?

-will


The paste has to settle in before you see any good temps with it. Also, did you apply the AS *exactly* as in their instructions (on their website)? Are you sure your heatsink is firmly positioned on the chip (and you know, actually makes contact with it)?

As for programs... Everest Home Edition works (get it from major geeks or something like that, it's not officially available any more)... does your mobo support nTune? That works the best (and seeing as it's a 680i, it "should").

Anyways, 50C seems *high* for a C2. Maybe the thing's heatspreader isn't making good contact with the core.

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You're heatsink's has to be off the processor. Make sure that your thermal paste is over all the processor, and that you're making contact with the heatsink completely. I always knew mine was tight with my processors because whenever I would pull the fan/heatsink off, the processor would come up with it. =X

My friend had the exact same problem, and he was using the stock fan. We checked it out, and sure enough, the piece of crap was halfway on. We found out that the stock fan clips that hold it down to the motherboard go loose after refitting it more than once, so we had to push them apart to keep it down on the processor.

IMO, the stock fan is useless...

For that very reason, when I got mine, I bought a custom heatsink (I've got a E6600 too). Blue Orb 2, and it works great. When I first turned my system on and let it sit for a while, the processor was 3 degrees colder than the motherboard (28 degrees Celsius!). With it overclocked to 4.5 Ghz, I'm at 36-38 degrees Celsius. I haven't had any problems with it, other than installing it into my small case. The heatsink is about 6.5" in diameter, that's why. The PSU I had bought was slightly larger, and therefore I had to push my fan against it slightly. Even my friend got a custom fan... =)

The Antec 900 is plenty large though, you wouldn't have any problems if you were to buy it. Another one might work better.

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Original post by 3fast3furious
Yes I am using nTune, and it is telling me my processor is around 39 - 40c idle, but in the bios system monitor it always says around 50c. What is the difference?


The BIOS, as simple as it seems, puts stress on the processor. It's not the same as idle.

Get Orthos (dual prime95) and run its torture test. Monitor your temps the WHOLE TIME. If they spike over 50C either:
a) Your chip is defective.
b) Your chip's heatspreader isn't making contact with the chip.
c) Your heatsink isn't making contact with your chip's heatspreader.
d) Your thermal paste isn't doing it's job (applied incorrectly).

A C2D should NOT be that hot.

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when my computer is just sitting there my gfx card will be at around 49 to 50c. Right when i get done playing half life 2, the card will be at about 57 - 58c. I am going to try the prime 95 tortue test.

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Also, I'm not sure on how much this affects the processor temperature, but if my processor is idling in the low 40s, how much should that rise if say my room temperature rises a few degrees? Or if it lowers a few degrees? Im not sure how hot is in there right now but it should be around 75-77 farenheit (25-26c?). I will run the torture test when i get home around 5:30 central time

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Considering the max temperatures are 60 degrees, you have still 10 degrees breathing space. Look at heat spreader if it's tightly connected, and warm. You might actually look at the voltage as well. BIOS readings are not that far from CPU running at full power. Of course while CPU is running quickly in BIOS, GFX is not.

It might be because your GFX card is warming up the system. IIRC ordinary 8800 has 150 W, yours is overclocked.

BTW I have 24 degrees when idle with common work (like music, writing, programming), 39 degrees under stress test.

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One mistake a lot of people make when applying heatsinks is to use TOO FRIGGIN' MUCH THERMAL PASTE, which greatly reduces heat transfer. If you used more than about a pinhead-sized amount, take the heatsink off, wipe all the thermal paste off the heatsink (but not off the CPU), and put it back on. Chances are you'll see a marked improvement.

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Original post by Sneftel
One mistake a lot of people make when applying heatsinks is to use TOO FRIGGIN' MUCH THERMAL PASTE, which greatly reduces heat transfer. If you used more than about a pinhead-sized amount, take the heatsink off, wipe all the thermal paste off the heatsink (but not off the CPU), and put it back on. Chances are you'll see a marked improvement.


That's very true. To get the thermal paste off, first wash your hands to remove any oils. Use rubbing alcohol and a lint-free cloth to carefully remove the paste. Now put about a rice-sized drop of thermal paste right in the center of the CPU. Do NOT spread it around -- putting on the heat sink will spread it evenly.

Yes, CPUs are very sensitive to any lint, oils, or too much thermal compound.

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Find a good online tutorial about how to install a heatsink, one with plenty of pictures. I believe the manufacturer of arctic silver has one on their website actually.

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When I re-applied the heatsink, I went to the arctic silver website for instructions and it told me to put a line of it down the cpu, so that is what I did. Out of everyone I have asked or read about, I can't get a consistent answer on how to apply thermal compound. It seems evenly divided on: putting on a bb sized drop, putting a line down the middle, smearing it all around with a credit card or something. But I followed the arctic silver website and here I am. Also are you sure the max heat for those cpus are around 60c? I thought they were a lot higher since in my bios the fan was set to come on full power when it hit 70c. However the first thing I did was turn off smart fan and run it at 100% all the time.

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Original post by 3fast3furious
When I re-applied the heatsink, I went to the arctic silver website for instructions and it told me to put a line of it down the cpu, so that is what I did. Out of everyone I have asked or read about, I can't get a consistent answer on how to apply thermal compound. It seems evenly divided on: putting on a bb sized drop, putting a line down the middle, smearing it all around with a credit card or something. But I followed the arctic silver website and here I am. Also are you sure the max heat for those cpus are around 60c? I thought they were a lot higher since in my bios the fan was set to come on full power when it hit 70c. However the first thing I did was turn off smart fan and run it at 100% all the time.


Follow AS's instructions (which is what you did, which is good [wink]). No one can give you better instructions to something than the person/company who makes it [smile]

<dumbass>Did you run Orthos (or dual prime95)?</dumbass>
Nevermind, I see you'll try it when you get home [grin].

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Ok, I went home for lunch, and I ran Orthos for 1 minute. That is right, ONE minute, and I monitored temperatures via nVidia Monitor, and at the 1 minute mark the cpu temp was at 60c so I stopped it. Should I buy a new heat sink or try to re apply again?

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Original post by 3fast3furious
Ok, I went home for lunch, and I ran Orthos for 1 minute. That is right, ONE minute, and I monitored temperatures via nVidia Monitor, and at the 1 minute mark the cpu temp was at 60c so I stopped it. Should I buy a new heat sink or try to re apply again?


Wow. That is most definitely NOT good.

Before we jump to conclusions, go into BIOS and check that it's not over-clocked/over-volted (maybe the motherboard didn't detect it correctly or something).

1) Are you 100% confident that you applied the thermal paste correctly? If not, try to do it again (clean it with some extremely pure alcohol, 99%).

2) Is the heatsink making contact with the CPU? This may sound kinda stupid, but when you take the heatsink off, see how well spread the thermal paste is (and how thick it is). If it's thick and/or not spread well, then your heatsink never made "perfect" contact. It has to be seated tightly (just don't break anything [wink]).

3) I hate to say it, but there's a possibility your chip is defective. Either your cores themselves are defective or the heatspreader on the chip is not making [good] contact with the cores... Not sure what you'd do in this case (you know, besides getting a new processor).

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Has anyone used PC wizard? I am using it right now to monitor the temperatures as well as nTune and it is giving me the temperatures of both cores and they are actually 5c apart from eachother. One core is regestering in at 36c and the other is coming in at 41c. Does this mean my heatsink is not seated properly?(hopefully), or that the cpu heatspreader is all messed?

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That actually brings up a good point... You say you've got a stock Heatsink, most of which come with thermal-pads (or a thick layer of thermal grease) applied. How did you go about removing/cleaning it off before you applied your Arctic Silver?

How does the grease look when you pull the heatsink off? If its applied well it should cover the top of the CPU entirely and it should be very thin. The purpose of thermal compound is not to stick the heatsink to the CPU, or to sit between it. its purpose is to fill the minute flaws in the otherwise-smooth surfaces.

Also, as has been said, you won't see your settled temps for possibly as much as 2 weeks, maybe even longer. It takes time, and several heat-cool cycles for the compound to spread and work its way into those flaws before you see its full effect. As it is, your temps seem a tad high, but are well within safe tolerances, so if you've applied the compound to the best of your knowledge and ability, its probably better at this point to not touch it for awhile and see how it settles over the coming weeks. Your processor has built-in protections against overheating, so there's no worry that your CPU will be fried -- although I would suggest you double-check your voltages as the other posted suggested on the off-chance that the CPU didn't detect correctly.

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Also I thought I'd add, core number 2 is the one regestering at 41c idle and that is what nTune is telling me my cpu temp is, but pc Wizard is saying CPU temp (different from the individual temperatures of the cores) is 31c, which is the same as the nTune system temp reading.

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Original post by 3fast3furious
Has anyone used PC wizard? I am using it right now to monitor the temperatures as well as nTune and it is giving me the temperatures of both cores and they are actually 5c apart from eachother. One core is regestering in at 36c and the other is coming in at 41c. Does this mean my heatsink is not seated properly?(hopefully), or that the cpu heatspreader is all messed?


It's entirely possible that one core is under more load than the other, in which case it would produce more heat. Open up your task manager, and look at the CPU loads under the Performance tab. If the CPUs are under roughly the same load while temps are skewed by several degrees, then its possible, though not necessarily indicative, that there is a flaw.

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When I pulled the heatsink off for the first time after seeing the temperatures in the BIOS, I cleaned it off with rubbing alcohol and a q-tip(is that bad?). Since the heatsink was only on for about 20 minutes the first time, when i took it off it looked just all smudgy and did not cover the entire area of the cpu. So I thought that it was not seated properly so that is when I applied the arctic silver. I rechecked the system voltages and it says they are correct.

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Ok I think I am going to change to a different heatsink. I keep getting the same temps and I want a cooler looking one anyways since there is a side window in my case. Only one question: When cleaning off the grease from the old application, should I clean it off the heatsink and the cpu or just the heatsink? And what are good items to use to clean it? I know high quality rubbing alcohol is good but what about lint free items?

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Original post by 3fast3furious
Out of everyone I have asked or read about, I can't get a consistent answer on how to apply thermal compound. It seems evenly divided on: putting on a bb sized drop, putting a line down the middle, smearing it all around with a credit card or something. But I followed the arctic silver website and here I am. Also are you sure the max heat for those cpus are around 60c? I thought they were a lot higher since in my bios the fan was set to come on full power when it hit 70c. However the first thing I did was turn off smart fan and run it at 100% all the time.


Overclockers, and professionals are doing. Just before applying heatsink, apply thermal compound on the CPU. Smear it by something straight and sharp to cover CPU by a THIN surface.

Never put a line, it's bad idea.

E6600 is up to 60 degrees according to manufacturer. (This mean a long term exposure shouldn't exceed 60 degrees for long time to get expected live time.) Newer CPUs are up to 61 degrees, quad cores and extreme editions are up to 70 - 75 degrees.
Air incoming into the case shouldn't exceed 38 degrees. (and using sun exposure is also not recommended, just as there should be sufficient room and well ventilated behind the case.)

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Original post by Raghar
Overclockers, and professionals are doing. Just before applying heatsink, apply thermal compound on the CPU. Smear it by something straight and sharp to cover CPU by a THIN surface.

Never put a line, it's bad idea.


Bullshit. So you're saying that you know more about a product than the company who makes it? How is the C2D assembled? I'm assuming it's 2 cores, one next to the other. Thus, a line would be COMMON SENSE. If it's one core, then it should be a small "dot", like a rice piece, in the center. The heatsink, when fastened properly, will spread the paste out perfectly.

@ OP: You have to clean it off both the CPU *and* the heatsink. Make it so clean that there isn't even a dust particle on it [wink]. As for what to clean it with, I got some little 99.99% alcohol "wipes", lint-free. They were designed for this kind of thing... I just don't remember what they were called... They came in packets, one packet -> one wipe; I think 10 came in one small bag.

Oh, and be careful with the alcohol. Open your windows and make sure you're well ventilated. Inhalation of practically pure alcohol is quiet dangerous (speaking from personal experience, I got a headache and felt dizzy after accidentally sniffing the thing).

You might also get some more (as well as more educated) responses in a specialized tech forum. Techspot, for example (I go there).

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